perfect-crime

The world’s scariest drug has the prettiest origin. Scopolamine is a drug from the seeds of this flower. In small doses, it’s used to cure motion sickness. In large doses, it can cause something called the ‘Zombie effect’. The person dosed with scopolamine becomes highly suggestible and unable to think for themselves. Basically, whatever you tell them to do, they’ll do. After the scopolamine wears off, everything, even the dosing, is completely wiped from the victim’s memory. The person dosed remembers nothing. It creates, essentially, the perfect crime. Every cop’s nightmare. Mother Nature is scarier than any lab-created drug.

I just realized something about occultists and crime

Imagine an occultist uses magic to commit a crime knowing society at large doesn’t really believe in it. So when you got to trial you may get some odd person who accuses you of it, and even if the judge takes it seriously, then you just get some atheist/materialist activists to convince the nay sayers that magic isn’t real while you snicker in the corner and get away with the perfect crime ^^

What is my perfect crime? I break into Tiffany’s at midnight. Do I go for the vault? No. I go for the chandelier. It’s priceless. As I’m taking it down, a woman catches me. She tells me to stop. It’s her father’s business. She’s Tiffany. I say no. We make love all night. In the morning, the cops come, and I escape in one of their uniforms. I tell her to meet me in Mexico, but I go to Canada. I don’t trust her. Besides, I like the cold. Thirty years later, I get a postcard. I have a son, and he’s the chief of police. This is where the story gets interesting. I tell Tiffany to meet me in Paris by the Trocadero. She’s been waiting for me all these years. She’s never taken another lover. I don’t care. I don’t show up. I go to Berlin. That’s where I stashed the chandelier.
—  Dwight Schrute

If the perfect crime happened, would we even know?

The 3 Most Perfect Crimes (and How to Commit Them)

#3. The Undetected Crime

There must be a few undetected crimes out there, and we can certainly see hints of them by looking at failed examples. Consider Yvonne Gladys Fletcher, an Australian woman convicted in the 1950s of poisoning not one, but two of her husbands with thallium. Thallium is an odorless, tasteless chemical, and when absorbed by the body, it evidently results in symptoms that look a bit like dying from natural causes, making it a popular choice for poisoners (bizarrely so in Australia, which had a brief fad of thallium poisoning in the 1950s).

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