people with accents

No offense but the worst people in anime/game fandoms that aren’t English speaking to begin with are definitely those people who are anti-dub and have to tell you about it.

You probably don’t even speak Japanese so why do you care so much if an anime gets a dub. No one is forcing you to buy it or watch it. There are legitimate reasons people prefer dubs like they can’t read fast enough to follow it, maybe they’re blind, maybe they just prefer paying attention to the animation and action over reading subtitles.

Get off your high horse. You’re not cool for denouncing the English dubs or talking about how terrible they are or how bad English voice actors are. Please. 🙄

Listen

ASOIAF Accent Challenge. I was doing a lot yesterday and recorded this first thing this morning, so apologies for the exhausted morning voice. Please enjoy my wincing at bad pronunciations and thinking way too long on who would sit on the Iron Throne

Tagging the people who sent in the accent: @handofhonor @killthebxy @daenfireys @fiightcr @acharmingbird @heirofhighgarden @wolfqueennamedstark @trustmeimawitch @the-self-proclaimed-prince @stillgotclaws @the-lady-oneill

I took my father to see Rogue One today. I’ve wanted to take him for a while. I wanted my Mexican father, with his thick Mexican accent, to experience what it was like to see a hero in a blockbuster film, speak the way he does. And although I wasn’t sure if it was going to resonate with him, I took him anyway. When Diego Luna’s character came on screen and started speaking, my dad nudged me and said, “he has a heavy accent.” I was like, “Yup.” When the film was over and we were walking to the car, he turns to me and says, “did you notice that he had an accent?” And I said, “Yeah dad, just like yours.” Then my dad asked me if the film had made a lot of money. I told him it was the second highest grossing film of 2016 despite it only being out for 18 days in 2016 (since new year just came around). He then asked me if people liked the film, I told him that it had a huge following online and great reviews. He then asked me why Diego Luna hadn’t changed his accent and I told him that Diego has openly talked about keeping his accent and how proud he is of it. And my dad was silent for a while and then he said, “And he was a main character.” And I said, “He was.” And my dad was so happy. As we drove home he started telling me about other Mexican actors that he thinks should be in movies in America. Representation matters.

4

“Back on the treadmill, trying to fit into my wardrobe!” (SDCC 2017)

Dark’s voice in fanfiction: “His voice deep and gravelly, yet sophisticated and enthralling, luring people in like a deadly siren, etc.”

 Anti’s voice in fanfiction: “w͠h̢at t͘e͜ f҉ook d̶o y̢e ҉wa̵nt t̴h̶is̕ ̛ty͞me ͘ya͢ ̵ars̵e͜ piec̵e͟ of shi̸te̵? foo҉kin͡'͞ ͞c͟irc͞l̡e̢ş ̀i͠ tel̸l ya͞,̷ ̡jeasu͝s͝ ͘chri̢st͏🔪🔪🍀”

 Here are a few language headcanons, because I know you kids love them:

Viktor’s English doesn’t really get proficient until he’s in his late teens, probably after the Turin Olympics. He’s spoken French flawlessly since he was small, but English doesn’t come to him as quickly for a variety of reasons, so there are plenty of remnants of his pre-fluency days–interviews where his accent is thick and his articles are nonexistent. Viktor is embarrassed by them; Yuuri covets them.

Yuuri, on the other hand, has been more or less fluent in English since a young age, through the combined efforts of Minako and maybe his father. His time in America only improved his fluency. He speaks in a midwestern lilt, tends to speak with sibilant S’s, and drops double consonants. People have called his accent ‘feminine’–which is hilarious to Yuuri, because he grew up speaking Japanese in an incredibly gruff accent.

(An accent, by the way, that Viktor picks up)

There are many people, however, who don’t realize that Yuuri speaks such good English. He has a long history of letting others–his coaches, Viktor, Phichit–speak for him, and many people assume that this is because he doesn’t speak English well. Of course, the truth is that Yuuri just doesn’t want to talk to the press. 

Yuuri is perfectly happy to let them think he’s not fluent–and even encourages this misconception by bowing-and-nodding his way through crowds of reporters.

Sometimes, when he’s caught by a reporter and has to say something, he deliberately says something to Viktor in Japanese, who then translates it into something more palatable than what he actually said.

“Tell her my legs feel like they’re going to fall off and I want to go the fuck home, Viktor.”

“Yuuri’s very tired right now! We’ll answer questions at the presser tomorrow, thank you!”

(This has gotten them in trouble a few times. Yuuri’s Japanese is difficult to understand for even a native speaker, unless that speaker also comes from Kyushu, but Yuuri receives a very cross Skype call from his mother after a press interview during which the microphone picked up Yuuri telling Viktor to tell a reporter that his toupee looked like a bird had made its nest on top of his head. Toshiya was in the background of this Skype call, trying to look stern and failing because he kept having to look off into the distance and push down his laughter. Mari wasn’t even trying–Yuuri could hear her laughter from the kitchen.)

Yuuri’s Viktor Nikiforov Obsessed Ass took a Russian minor in college. He’s conversational in Russian by the time Viktor drops into his life, and his fluency only increases from there. 

It gets to the point where Yuuri and Viktor flip semi-randomly between Japanese and Russian. This is 50% because they don’t even notice themselves doing it anymore, and 50% because neither of them likes their marriage being surrounded by microphones and cameras 24/7.

Of course, there are large teams of dedicated fan translators who have made it their solemn duty to figure out what it is that Yuuri and Viktor are muttering about in the kiss-and-cry, because sometimes it’s boring stuff (Technical things, groceries, Makkachin’s next vet appointment) but sometimes it’s things like “I’m going to eat a whole cheesecake when this competition is done and you can’t stop me” / ”I’ll watch you.” 

“Who on earth has this much time on their hands?” Yuuri mutters to himself, when someone sends him a link to an archive of translations, and Viktor just makes a vague noise and keeps scrolling.

“In the darkness, two shadows, reaching through the hopeless, heavy dusk. Their hands meet, and light spills in a flood like a hundred golden urns pouring out of the sun." 

φίλτᾰτος 

The Song of Achilles | Madeline Miller 

by Shauna @grizzlytattoo

  • Normal people: the way you talk is wrong
  • Normal people: your accent is wrong
  • Normal people: your tone and inflections are all wrong
  • Normal people: your facial expressions are wrong
  • Normal people: your contributions to discussion are all so terribly wrong
  • Normal people: you're not smiling properly
  • Normal people: your body language is an abomination unto mankind
  • Normal people: what is wrong with you and your hand gestures
  • Normal people: make more hand gestures or everyone's going to think you're a serial killer
  • Normal people: I have never before beheld a horror like that of your natural voice
  • Normal people: don't talk about your interests
  • Normal people: but make sure you do talk
  • Normal people: can't you just watch the normals and copy what they're doing?
  • Normal people: no you weren't supposed to copy that bit
  • Normal people: everything about the way you interact is wrong
  • Normal people: why don't you want to be social??? Why don't you want to TALK to people???? Why are you so quiet and withdrawn???
The only thing I want is to be able to travel, to look around and know where I am yet don’t know at all, to meet new people and languages and accents and monuments and food and cultures, to be able to look around with an entirely new sense of wonder. I think then I’ll be home
—  c.t.//excerpt from a book I won’t write
Different ways to study

A few of you have been asking about ways to revise (that’s not just making notes). Here’s a list of some different techniques you can use to revise/study:

  • Notes - making notes is the ‘standard’ way of studying - summarising information from textbooks/revision guides into your own words
  • Mind-maps - making these is a great way to organise ideas and link different ideas
  • Posters - big and colourful posters are a great way to summarise info as well as a more fun way of working
  • Teaching - teaching others (anyone who will listen to you will do) is a great way, as it will really show whether you really know the info by how well you can explain it to someone who knows nothing about it
  • Videos - watching videos can be a nice and easy way to revise, and are useful for visual and/or auditory learners
  • Podcasts - you can download and listen to podcasts when you are walking to school etc. which is a great way to get extra revision in, and they’re great for auditory learners
  • Flashcards - these can be useful for making really concise notes, as well as making Q&A or key word and definition cards - they are also really compact so you can take them with you
  • Group study - working with friends can help bounce ideas off each other, bringing up things you might not have thought about alone - you will all have different strengths that will help each other out
  • Past questions - doing past papers and looking at mark schemes will help your timings and application of knowledge/exam technique
  • Write (don’t type) - making notes on tablets/laptops is fine, but when it comes to writing practise essays always write because that’s what you will be doing in the exam (unless you use a laptop for some reason) so it’s best to practise for timings etc.
  • Further reading - reading articles and books around the subject areas will give you a broader idea of the concepts and a better overall understanding
  • Accents/voices - some people find using different accents or characters of voices helps them remember things (in the exam you can recall info because you remember you said it in an Australian accent for example)
  • Key word lists - making lists of words and definitions can be useful, as using key words in context in essays/questions is what gets you the higher marks
  • Post-it notes - writing key ideas on post-it notes and sticking them in places you go commonly (on the fridge, by the light switch, in your bedroom, on the TV etc) 
  • Apps - there are loads of great apps that you can download to make notes and flashcards etc. as well as apps for generally increasing your productivity - see my studying apps post here
  • Songs/mnemonics - making funny little songs to remember processes can be really useful, as they really stick in your head
  • Charts/timelines - depending on the subject, making timelines and charts can be really useful as a different visual representation

Things that confuse me in Fallout 4:

  • you can heal Nick Valentine…with a stimpack??
  • burnt and ruined books, empty lunchboxes and napkins somehow don’t count as “Junk” but functional circuit boards, biometric scanners and distress pulsers do
  • How the Institute hasn’t found the Railroad HQ yet, considering there is a massive red line leading directly to a location that has their fucking logo painted on the outside wall
  • the password is  R-A-I-L-R-O-A-D ffs how has nobody besides some random dude from a vault figured this out before
  • how did Ironsides get on that ship. also where did he get that sweet hat
  • Diamond City people remember what Halloween and Christmas is, but have forgotten how baseball works despite living in an old baseball stadium
  • how can the Bobrovs have a Russian accent when nobody’s had contact with Russia in 200+ years? same for Cait’s Irish accent or Proctor Quinlain’s british
  • “yes I’m sure this 200 year old irradiated canned slop is still good to eat”
Seriously, this is the tiniest thing.

Like, a very small concern. A minuscule nitpick.

But folks, it’s Len, not Leo.

Here’s why:

Bones is a man of the deep south. I grew up in Arkansas. I can say it. People with southern accents are lazy speakers.

Put down the pitchforks, and hear me out.

We don’t like to enunciate. We don’t like syllables. 

I’ll give you an example.

“Y’all’d’ve”

Ladies and gentlemen, when I was first exposed to the term, “y’all’d’ve,” I did not understand. 

In fact, I’m not ashamed. I had to google it.

I immediately laughed so hard.

Because where I’m from, we don’t say, “Y’all’d’ve.”

It’s, “Y’all’da.”

As in, “Y’all woulda.”

There’s no V sound. 

In fact, the idea of a V sound at the end of “you all would have” was so foreign to me that I did not even recognize it was a thing. 

Which brings me back to “Len.”

Ask anybody south of the Mason Dixon to say, “Leonard.”

I’d bet good money that, phonetically, what comes out is “Len-ard.” 

Len.

Leonard is two syllables (as I pronounce it - I’m sure some will disagree). Leo is two syllables. Len is the phonetic diminutive of Leonard (as the McCoy family likely pronounces it). Len is only one syllable. 

Lazy speakers, remember? 

In other words, what’s the point of a nickname that’s not any easier to spit out?

For the record, I absolutely love the name Leo. I think it’s adorable. It’s quirky and masculine. It’s a great name, and a great nickname. It’s just not Leonard McCoy’s.

I’ll admit, I have a little bit (little bit) easier time imagining Leo as a nickname for AOS Bones. That’s probably because I find it impossible to divorce De from the image of the quintessential “southern boy.” Not sure if it’s the cadence of his speech, or the way he says nuclear as “nucular,” or if it’s just because he’s the original, but De is Bones, Bones is Len

Like I said, it’s the tiniest of nitpicks. I love a Leo fic as much as I love a Len fic. 

But to me, he’s Len. 

South African TV Watcher Problems

I feel the need to rant. 

As some of you may know, I am a South African. And as a South African who watches a whole lot of American TV, I have developed a pet peeve against having South African characters showing up in American TV shows because I can count on my one hand the amount of times they’ve gotten the accent right.

So, for those of you who don’t know, South Africans do not sound European, German, Dutch, or Australian, which are the accents normally given to South African characters, and it really greats my cheese. 

South Africans have many unique accents, and they rarely ever actually get heard when South African characters show up on American TV (I don’t watch much British TV so I can’t speak for them)

Now, don’t get me wrong, I know South African accents are difficult, but it is not impossible to learn how to do them. 

For those of you would like to hear what a South African accent really sounds like, you can find them here:

> Leverage s01e01 - Gina Bellman is amazing and her South African accent in this was so well done, I almost thought she was South African.

> Captain America: Civil War - Dear, sweet Chadwick Boseman did such a good job with his accent when he played T’Challa, and John Kahni, the actor who played King T’Chaka is a South African man, you can’t get an accent better than that.

> Avengers: Age of Ultron - When Andy Serkis showed up on screen as Ulyesses Klaue and opened his mouth a legit thought I was listening to a South African man speak. Imagine my surprise when I found out that he wasn’t one! Guys, I have not heard a better South African accent done by a non-South African than I what I heard coming from this man’s mouth.

> Voltron Legendary Defender S02E03 - Bet you guys weren’t expecting this one. Yes, my fellow Voltron fans, when you hear Ulaz speak, you are indeed listening to the voice of Arnold Vosloo, another South African man. Hearing his voice made me so happy, especially since he did not hide his accent as I have heard so man *cough - Charlieze Theron - cough* actors and actresses do.

So, there you have it people, don’t trust every South African accent you hear on screen, chances are you will be hearing some other accent.

@rangergirl3

ps: this was brought on by the addition of Doctor Becker on Chicago Med. She is supposedly South African. Her accent suggests that she lied about where she comes from coz it sure as heck ain’t South African