people tips

anonymous asked:

I remember one time I tipped a driver $10 and the look on his face was incredible. He was so shocked and grateful I couldn't believe it? Like do people really just? Not tip?

a lot!! or their total will be like 11.50 and they’ll hand you 12 and be like “keep the change :)”

Things You Don't Comment On:

- someone’s eating habits

- appearance issues that can’t be fixed there and then

- someone else’s “bad” decision if it can’t now be undone

- someone’s laugh or voice

- someone’s “unrealistic” dreams

- someone “not looking their best” in photos

- someone not wanting to do something and trying to subtly avoid it without making a fuss

- anything that you know will make someone self conscious or insecure unnecessarily

how to look like a nonbinary person

1. be nonbinary

2. wear what you like

congratulations! you now look nonbinary, because you are nonbinary! heres a lady bug to brighten up your day 🐞

Actually

The question I get the most is how I write characters that feel like real people. 

Generally when I’m designing a human being, I deconstruct them into 7 major categories:

1. Primary Drive
2. Fear: Major and Secondary
3. Physical Desires
4. Style of self expression
5. How they express affection
6. What controls them (what they are weak for)
7. What part of them will change.

1. Primary Drive: This is generally related to the plot. What are their plot related goals? How are they pulling the plot forward? how do they make decisions? What do they think they’re doing and how do they justify doing it.

2. Fear: First, what is their deep fear? Abandonment? being consumed by power? etc. Second: tiny fears. Spiders. someone licking their neck. Small things that bother them. At least 4.

3. Physical desires. How they feel about touch. What is their perceived sexual/romantic orientation. Do their physical desires match up with their psychological desires.

4. Style of self expression: How they talk. Are they shy? Do they like to joke around and if so, how? Are they anxious or confident internally and how do they express that externally. What do words mean to them? More or less than actions? Does their socioeconomic background affect the way they present themselves socially? 

5. How they express affection: Do they express affection through actions or words. Is expressing affection easy for them or not. How quickly do they open up to someone they like. Does their affection match up with their physical desires. how does the way they show their friends that they love them differ from how they show a potential love interest that they love them. is affection something they struggle with?

6. What controls them (what they are weak for): what are they almost entirely helpless against. What is something that influences them regardless of their own moral code. What– if driven to the end of the wire— would they reject sacrificing. What/who would they cut off their own finger for.  What would they kill for, if pushed. What makes them want to curl up and never go outside again from pain. What makes them sink to their knees from weakness or relief. What would make them weep tears of joy regardless where they were and who they were in front of. 

7. WHAT PART OF THEM WILL CHANGE: people develop over time. At least two of the above six categories will be altered by the storyline–either to an extreme or whittled down to nothing. When a person experiences trauma, their primary fear may change, or how they express affection may change, etc. By the time your book is over, they should have developed. And its important to decide which parts of them will be the ones that slowly get altered so you can work on monitoring it as you write. making it congruent with the plot instead of just a reaction to the plot. 

That’s it.

But most of all, you have to treat this like you’re developing a human being. Not a “character” a living breathing person. When you talk, you use their voice. If you want them to say something and it doesn’t seem like (based on the seven characteristics above) that they would say it, what would they say instead?

If they must do something that’s forced by the plot, that they wouldn’t do based on their seven options, they can still do the thing, but how would they feel internally about doing it?

How do their seven characteristics meet/ meld with someone else’s seven and how will they change each other?

Once you can come up with all the answers to all of these questions, you begin to know your character like you’d know one of your friends. When you can place them in any AU and know how they would react.

They start to breathe.

hey look it’s your daily reminder that it costs $0 to be kind and respectful to broadway performers

What to Do if Witchcraft Drains You

Witchcraft requires summoning and manipulating energy. It takes a lot of work. As a result, sometimes spellwork can end up tiring people mentally, emotionally, or physically. If you find yourself drained after a spell, you can do many things:

  1. Eat something sugary, carbs, or fruit. This runs along the same vein as a nurse advising you to eat sugar after drawing blood: The sugar will reenergize you.
  2. Drink tea or water. Stay hydrated! even when not casting spells. In general, oolongs, blacks, and fruity teas can help energize you, whereas green teas and herbals (especially lavender, chamomile, mints and rose) can relax you.
  3. Light your favorite incense or candle. Frankincense, sage, cedar, dragon’s blood, patchouli, cinnamon, pine, and sandalwood are good cleansing and promoting positive energy. Or, light your favorite scent–it’ll automatically calm and re-energize you.
  4. Carry a stone with you. Amethyst, citrine, obsidian, rose quartz, lapis lazuli, jade, and hematite are good considerations for re-energizing and healing spiritual energy. 
  5. …or, carry another special item with you! If you have a special pendant, prayer beads, necklace or other item that means a lot to you and comforts you, it can help restore your energy just by being in your presence.
  6. Take a bath or shower
  7. Take a walk out in nature. Even though you may not feel like working out, exercising can actually energize you rather than deplete you. You can absorb nature’s energies to replenish yours, too.
  8. Take a nap, or get a good night’s sleep. If you want an extra boost, place a healing stone under your pillow to recharge you while you sleep.
  9. Watch a funny movie or video, or read a good book. It’ll relax you, take your mind off your drained feeling, and correct any “off” feelings you may have.
  10. Work on something else that requires minimal energy. This could be crafting, knitting, watering your plants, or even doing your homework. Getting back into the groove of things will help reset your energy and stabilize you for daily life.
  11. Friends! If calling a friend or socializing will relax you, go for it! It’ll make you happier, too.

I hope you may rest well, take care of yourself and have a blessed path! (◕‿◕✿) Sincerely, a witch who’s exhausted after performing spells for four hours.

youtube

I never thought I’d get to see club penguin’s iceberg tip but here we are, probably 10 years since I stopped believing it was possible, and dreams have come true. (Excuse the sniff in the middle - I was holding back tears)

How People Watching Improves Your Writing

Sensory detail. 

When I was fourteen or fifteen, I liked to draw. I’d look up internet tutorials on how to draw the human figure, and nearly all of them suggested going outside and sketching anyone who goes by. Not only was this relaxing, but I noticed my art style become more realistic over time. I think we can apply similar concepts as writers to improve sensory description. 

How to practice: Try writing down specific details about the people you see. How is their walking gait? What does their voice sound like? What quirks about them stand out as you observe them? Write down descriptions using all of the senses (except maybe taste) and, over time, you’ll notice your words become more lively.

Observation.

You don’t have to be Sherlock Holmes to benefit from observation skills. Writing stories is all about noticing connections and seeing the extraordinary in ordinary life. People watching can boost your ability to notice little details and recognize them as important, and it can help you sense patterns more easily.

How to practice: In this case, remember once again that you are not Sherlock Holmes. Don’t assume that you know a person’s life story based on what socks they’re wearing (and definitely don’t try making such assumptions with friends or family). 

Try to take in people who pass by and the small, unique details about them. Notice how they’re interacting with other people and the world around them. Think about why that might be and write down any thoughts or connections that interest you.

Freewriting. 

Writing first drafts can paralyze anyone. We all know that getting the words out is the first, most important step, but that can feel like torture sometimes. If you’re a hesitant writer, freewriting can help you feel less self-conscious when writing and jot down thoughts or impressions as they come. Other exercises can help you with editing later on, but you can’t get there unless you freewrite.

How to practice: Write down anything that strikes you without worrying whether it’s important or you’ll use it later. I like to focus on one person per minute and during that time, write anything that I find interesting. Once the sixty seconds are up, I move onto another person and continue that cycle as long as I want to keep going. With time, you’ll get faster and may notice that words come more easily.

Creativity. 

In the book Stargirl, one of my favorite parts is when Stargirl and Leo go to the park and play a game where they make up stories about the strangers they pass. As they connect together little observations, they create vivid backstories that may not necessarily be true, but that’s not the point. What matters is stretching their minds.

How to practice: Play this game for yourself. Pick a person at random and, piecing together little details you notice about them, give them a backstory. What are they doing, and where are they going (both right now and in the long-term)? Why are they hurrying so quickly to wherever they’re going or walking almost aimlessly along? Don’t worry about getting it “right” so much as creating an interesting story for this person.

Empathy. 

Developing empathy as a writer is so important, though not often talked about. If you can put yourself in the shoes of another person and consider what complexities, challenges, and little joys life holds for them, you will create emotionally powerful pieces. People watching helps train your eye to notice those around you more and remember that yours is not the only voice in the world.

How to practice: Remember the definition of the word “sonder:” the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own. Look for those complexities. Notice relationships. Notice facial expressions and emotions. Don’t just look at them but see them, and write down what strikes you about them.

Possibly unpopular opinion here, but I cannot stand the use of “realistic” casual dialogue. Ums and uhs and wells and yeahs and… random bouts of trailing off in the middle of sentences. 

You don’t want to write realistic dialogue. You want to write dialogue equivalent to your brain’s understanding of realistic dialogue.

The broken, casual phrasing might be natural, word for word. It might even sound natural to the person who’s writing it. But it doesn’t align with the way we comprehend speech. It doesn’t account for the work our subconscious does in order to dissect and analyze speech patterns, to take in a stream of disjointed words and create a concrete meaning.

In real life, we have the privilege of being entirely engulfed in the conversation, of experiencing every visual and vocal cue, and quite often of knowing the particular tendencies of the person we’re speaking with. The reader never has this. They are constantly limited to only what is stated on the page, brought to them at exactly the speed they read it.

In real life, we also have the redundancy of being a part of boring, anti-climatic conversations. Real conversations generally go nowhere. They’re fun for the people in them, but useless to everyone else. This isn’t what you want in you writing. You want dialogue that says something, with every sentence, every phrase, every line. 

Casual speech and inter-dialogue pacing (aka, the ‘…’ syndrome) has it’s place, but it’s place it not to show normalcy, but to emphasis difference. ‘Um, well… yeah’ is a stagnate, worthless line when used many times in the same story, but when used only a few times, in a book where the rest of the dialogue says what it means, it becomes an obvious sign of embarrassment and hesitation, even fear. 

So write the sort of solid, easily comprehended dialogue that allows your readers to subconsciously apply pacing, without visual cues like ‘…’ or the unless addition of yeah and well, or any other removable words or phrases.

Don’t write the exact words said. Write the meaning behind them.

Disclaimer below the cut:

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I’ve just got this BNHA idea that after they graduate they all get into the hero business; Iida does his brother’s name proud: Bakugou actually calms down a little: Shouto is able to prove he’s so much more than his father’s son.

Meanwhile Deku is well on the way to becoming the next top hero and the new Symbol of Peace ( the public is relieved: the criminals are shitting themselves, especially after Deku “accidentally” reveals in an interview that he’s reached about 50% so far ).

But one day, Deku’s facing a villain with a tricky quirk- maybe they’ve taken hostages, maybe they can absorb the power of his attacks. Anyway, Deku’s desperately trying to think of a way to beat this guy, when-

-a ball of paper hits the villain in the head. Everybody, Deku, the villain, the bystanders, see this guy jump the blockade and yell “Hey, asshole!” 

The villain snarls, and roars back “You little-” and stops with a very familiar blank look on their face. Deku starts grinning as the newcomer pulls off a false nose and takes off a wig, then opens his jacket to reveal a hero costume.

And the public lose their collective shit at the realisation that they’re seeing the Hero with a Thousand Faces, who goes undercover and uses his brainwashing quirk to take down the villains from within. And as he tells the villain “Sleep”, the crowd goes wild for the sight of Shinso Hitoshi, the hero called The Word.

(Shinso gets on great with Deku: he jokes it’s like pairing a sledgehammer and a scalpel. Deku’s one of the few people who never hesitates to answer Shinso- when he asked, Deku just grinned and said “Well, I know I can trust a fellow hero!”)

some makeup tips for lower-budget beginners

hello younger girls, trans girls, and anyone who wants to learn how to do makeup and doesn’t have $3k to drop on a kit, here’s a compilation of things i’ve learned doing makeup on myself and others over the years, and overspending on like, everything

- if you’re going to invest in anything, invest in foundation that won’t clog your pores/irritate your skin
- nyx has good eyeshadow singles
- nyx primer is also a+
- nyx is just great ok
- morphe palettes are twice as big as sephora palettes and half the price, and they’re almost (if not equally) as good.
- if you’re spending over 8$ on mascara you probably have something to prove
- take care of your skin your makeup will look 10x better if you do
- makeup wipes are convenient but overpriced and wasteful: garnier miscellar water is like $6.50, works better, and lasts a long time. put it on a paper towel or a kleenex or a cotton pad.
- beauty blenders are just fancy sponges that soak up your product and grow bacteria. don’t let instagram tell you you need one
- all the brushes you need: foundation (there are lots of kinds, my favorite is a japonesque round tapered synthetic brush), big fluffy powder, little fluffy blender for crease, little flat one for eyelid, medium fluffy cheek brush, eyeliner brush (angle or tiny skinny one, whichever you like better. sephora has an amazing angle liner brush for ~$14), brow brush if your aren’t using gel. the rest are great but you can do a full face with just those 7.
- don’t use creams with natural hair brushes. morphe + real techniques have great synthetic ones.
- maybelline 24 hour tattoo gel eyeliner is $9 and better than every gel liner i’ve ever used
- light-medium foundation with buildable coverage: one foundation for everyday and full glam
- colourpop’s lip products are ~$6 each and they’re amazing
- spray brush cleaner!!!!!!!!! (you can use rubbing alcohol but it can dry out natural hair brushes, and make sure it’s dry before putting it near your eyes bc that shit hurts)
- buy lashes online, buy duo lash glue at cvs
- HALLOWEEN STORE GLITTER (make sure it’s cosmetic grade!)

Tips for debating

I’ve debated in high school and have been seeing a lot of arguments stem from discussions about sensitive topics recently. So, I figured why not help others by giving tips so they can have an informative discussion. 

  • Be respectful - your opponent’s opinion may seem ridiculous even wrong to you but they also could believe that about your opinion. So try not to make your opponent seem dumb or inconsiderate because their views are different.
  • DO NOT USE AD HOMINEM ATTACKS
  • Try to use legitimate sources as much as possible when using facts.
  • Listen to your opponent - their side of the debate is just as important as yours, no matter how idiotic or frustrating it may seem to you.
  • Stay calm - try as much as possible to not get angry, no matter how ignorant the other person’s view may be.
  • Ask questions - if you don’t understand certain aspects of your opponent’s argument then ask.
  • Admit when you make a mistake - this is the hardest part of a debate, admitting when you were in the wrong. 

hopefully, this will help those of you who wish to change someone’s opinion.

10

I will say, hands are some of the hardest things to grasp when learning how to draw! Even people who have been drawing for years can be intimidated by these lil appendages! My methods for drawing them might be a bit weird, but I’m happy to share some of the things I try and keep in mind while trying to capture the essence of The Hand

I hope some people can find this useful! I could probably have gone on and on about drawing hands in this post but it’s already long enough-

Other Witches: you need to be super focused, no bad feeling for spells. Demons will get you <3 <3 xx

My Neurodivergent dissociative ass: