people tips

how to look like a nonbinary person

1. be nonbinary

2. wear what you like

congratulations! you now look nonbinary, because you are nonbinary! heres a lady bug to brighten up your day 🐞

How People Watching Improves Your Writing

Sensory detail. 

When I was fourteen or fifteen, I liked to draw. I’d look up internet tutorials on how to draw the human figure, and nearly all of them suggested going outside and sketching anyone who goes by. Not only was this relaxing, but I noticed my art style become more realistic over time. I think we can apply similar concepts as writers to improve sensory description. 

How to practice: Try writing down specific details about the people you see. How is their walking gait? What does their voice sound like? What quirks about them stand out as you observe them? Write down descriptions using all of the senses (except maybe taste) and, over time, you’ll notice your words become more lively.

Observation.

You don’t have to be Sherlock Holmes to benefit from observation skills. Writing stories is all about noticing connections and seeing the extraordinary in ordinary life. People watching can boost your ability to notice little details and recognize them as important, and it can help you sense patterns more easily.

How to practice: In this case, remember once again that you are not Sherlock Holmes. Don’t assume that you know a person’s life story based on what socks they’re wearing (and definitely don’t try making such assumptions with friends or family). 

Try to take in people who pass by and the small, unique details about them. Notice how they’re interacting with other people and the world around them. Think about why that might be and write down any thoughts or connections that interest you.

Freewriting. 

Writing first drafts can paralyze anyone. We all know that getting the words out is the first, most important step, but that can feel like torture sometimes. If you’re a hesitant writer, freewriting can help you feel less self-conscious when writing and jot down thoughts or impressions as they come. Other exercises can help you with editing later on, but you can’t get there unless you freewrite.

How to practice: Write down anything that strikes you without worrying whether it’s important or you’ll use it later. I like to focus on one person per minute and during that time, write anything that I find interesting. Once the sixty seconds are up, I move onto another person and continue that cycle as long as I want to keep going. With time, you’ll get faster and may notice that words come more easily.

Creativity. 

In the book Stargirl, one of my favorite parts is when Stargirl and Leo go to the park and play a game where they make up stories about the strangers they pass. As they connect together little observations, they create vivid backstories that may not necessarily be true, but that’s not the point. What matters is stretching their minds.

How to practice: Play this game for yourself. Pick a person at random and, piecing together little details you notice about them, give them a backstory. What are they doing, and where are they going (both right now and in the long-term)? Why are they hurrying so quickly to wherever they’re going or walking almost aimlessly along? Don’t worry about getting it “right” so much as creating an interesting story for this person.

Empathy. 

Developing empathy as a writer is so important, though not often talked about. If you can put yourself in the shoes of another person and consider what complexities, challenges, and little joys life holds for them, you will create emotionally powerful pieces. People watching helps train your eye to notice those around you more and remember that yours is not the only voice in the world.

How to practice: Remember the definition of the word “sonder:” the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own. Look for those complexities. Notice relationships. Notice facial expressions and emotions. Don’t just look at them but see them, and write down what strikes you about them.

youtube

I never thought I’d get to see club penguin’s iceberg tip but here we are, probably 10 years since I stopped believing it was possible, and dreams have come true. (Excuse the sniff in the middle - I was holding back tears)

Things You Don't Comment On:

- someone’s eating habits

- appearance issues that can’t be fixed there and then

- someone else’s “bad” decision if it can’t now be undone

- someone’s laugh or voice

- someone’s “unrealistic” dreams

- someone “not looking their best” in photos

- someone not wanting to do something and trying to subtly avoid it without making a fuss

- anything that you know will make someone self conscious or insecure unnecessarily

some makeup tips for lower-budget beginners

hello younger girls, trans girls, and anyone who wants to learn how to do makeup and doesn’t have $3k to drop on a kit, here’s a compilation of things i’ve learned doing makeup on myself and others over the years, and overspending on like, everything

- if you’re going to invest in anything, invest in foundation that won’t clog your pores/irritate your skin
- nyx has good eyeshadow singles
- nyx primer is also a+
- nyx is just great ok
- morphe palettes are twice as big as sephora palettes and half the price, and they’re almost (if not equally) as good.
- if you’re spending over 8$ on mascara you probably have something to prove
- take care of your skin your makeup will look 10x better if you do
- makeup wipes are convenient but overpriced and wasteful: garnier miscellar water is like $6.50, works better, and lasts a long time. put it on a paper towel or a kleenex or a cotton pad.
- beauty blenders are just fancy sponges that soak up your product and grow bacteria. don’t let instagram tell you you need one
- all the brushes you need: foundation (there are lots of kinds, my favorite is a japonesque round tapered synthetic brush), big fluffy powder, little fluffy blender for crease, little flat one for eyelid, medium fluffy cheek brush, eyeliner brush (angle or tiny skinny one, whichever you like better. sephora has an amazing angle liner brush for ~$14), brow brush if your aren’t using gel. the rest are great but you can do a full face with just those 7.
- don’t use creams with natural hair brushes. morphe + real techniques have great synthetic ones.
- maybelline 24 hour tattoo gel eyeliner is $9 and better than every gel liner i’ve ever used
- light-medium foundation with buildable coverage: one foundation for everyday and full glam
- colourpop’s lip products are ~$6 each and they’re amazing
- spray brush cleaner!!!!!!!!! (you can use rubbing alcohol but it can dry out natural hair brushes, and make sure it’s dry before putting it near your eyes bc that shit hurts)
- buy lashes online, buy duo lash glue at cvs
- HALLOWEEN STORE GLITTER (make sure it’s cosmetic grade!)

Recently, my Psychology 101 professor gave a short lecture on the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People and I jotted down some notes that I’d like to share with you.

Habit #1: Be Proactive

  • be responsible
  • show initiative
  • choose your actions and attitudes
  • do not blame others for your wrongdoings
  • learn from your mistakes
  • do the right thing without being asked
  • be a part of the solution, not the problem

Habit #2: Begin with the End in Mind
(My professor always has this on the first slide of her PowerPoint presentations and when she introduced its meaning to us, it definitely became something that I live by.)

  • plan ahead
  • set goals
  • do things that have meaning

Habit #3: Put First Things First

  • spend time on things that are important
  • set your priorities straight
  • make a schedule
  • follow your plan

Habit #4: Think Win-Win

  • see other people as a teammate rather than a competitor
  • look for alternatives
  • balance

Habit #5: Seek First to Understand, then to be Understood

  • listen to other people’s ideas
  • see things from another person’s point of view
  • listen without interrupting
  • voice out your ideas but remain respectful
  • look people in the eyes while talking

Habit #6: Synergize

  • value other people’s strengths and learn from them
  • get along well with others
  • seek out other people’s ideas
  • be humble

Habit #7: Sharpen the Saw

  • invest time on yourself
  • spend time with family and friends
  • find meaningful ways to help others
  • put importance on your physical, spiritual, social and mental development

Try to evaluate yourself based on these habits and see which ones you have already developed and which ones you need to work on!

i-do-what-i-want-im-punkrock  asked:

How hard is it to become an austronaut? I want to start to studie astrophysics and I don't know if I'll ever get any kind of job. Do you have any tips for people like me?

Astrophysics is a perfect field for pursuing any work at NASA!  A degree in a STEM field is a requirement of becoming an astronaut, but other than that there are many possibilities.  One of the best things about the astronaut office is its diversity.  We are scientists, engineers, military pilots, flight test engineers, medical doctors, etc. etc. My biggest tip is to ensure you are pursuing what it is you are passionate about as that’s the only way to truly become exceptional at what you are doing, and most importantly, to be happy doing it.  Passion, hard work, and dedication will get you there.  Good luck!

Okay, some people like studying with music, others don’t. I can only study with music that has no particular melody so I don’t start singing… Here are some playlists in all kinds of genres, so hopefully there is something for everyone. Also, feel free to add your own!

Backporch Blues
I think this is a sleeping playlist officially, so don’t doze off!

Calm and Focussed
I like this playlist of classical music, except it has the frickin Amélie theme again. Contains Vivaldi but also contemporary music

Calm Before the Storm
Soft rock-ish instrumental music (not all rock tho)

Code Mode
Electronic. No lyrics. Ever.

Deep Focus
I love this one for late night studying

Digster Sleep
Pop music to help you sleep focus

Focus: Classical & Electronic
If you can’t choose between the two I guess

Focus Modus
Instrumental, cheerful R&B/Indie/Rock? music

Focus Now
For your daily dose of classical music (no soundtracks etc)

Focus on the Mix
Remixes mostly of pop music

Focus - Video Game Music
Like the name says, some epic game music

In Deepest Blue
Actually an album but most tracks work great for studying

Indie Rock Brain Boost
Mostly popular Indie music

Instrumental Study
Ambient, instrumental music. Sometimes nature noises

Jazz - Classical Crossings
Jazz musicians performing classical works (also great if you’re not studying tbh)

Late Night Focus
Some more electronic music

Minimal Music
Mostly contemporary classical music. I skipped Amélie honestly that song is everywhere.

Mozart 50: Spotify Picks
If you feel like trying out that Mozart Effect

Musik Produkt
Electro-chill. I like this one, but it’s not as long as the others.

Productive Morning
Not too loud to get a headache, not to quiet to fall back asleep.

Soundtrack for Study
Just what the name says, but it does not feature many main themes so you’re less likely to recognise them and get distracted!

Studeren
Classical music, similar to Calm and Focussed. Also has the Amélie theme *cries*

Studying Music
Quiet focus music, downside is that the tracks are very short

Study Vibes
Electronic study music, does have vocals sometimes.

The Focus Lounge
House music. Most tracks are pretty repetitive so not very distracting

To Do List
Electronic focus music, this is honestly my favourite ever.

White Noise
Just as the name says, white noise for focus.

anonymous asked:

This sounds weird but could you give some advice to other fanfiction writers? You're really good. 💕

oh my goooooooood where are all you lovely people coming from tonight?? 

alrighty, let’s give this a go!

Fanfic Tips:

Character Motivation

This is my biggest thing. You should always, at any given moment, know what every character in a scene wants. What they want is going to dictate how they act and react to things. Without characters wanting things, nobody ever does anything, and your fic doesn’t exist. 

When characters have different motivations and have to come together, magic happens. And as characters develop, their motivations change. 

Great example?

what Luke wants (general motivation: freedom -> The Right Thing): to get off his uncle’s farm and get to go be with his friends at the academy -> to be a Jedi and fight for the rebellion -> to learn more but also keep his friends safe -> to redeem his father.

what Leia wants (general motivation: fight Empire): to get the Death Star plans to the rebel base and find Obi-Wan Kenobi -> to not be in the Empire’s clutches -> to blow up the Death star -> to not be in the Empire’s clutches -> to save Han -> to blow up the other Death Star 

what Han wants (general motivation: self-preservation -> protect friends): to get his hands on some money so that he doesn’t get killed by a mob boss -> to escape the empire -> to help the rebellion/keep his friends safe

(Obi-Wan, meanwhile, pretty much just wants to keep Luke safe, and help the rebellion if he can.)

All different, all interweaving, most of them changing as the characters are influenced by others, and learn and grow. 

So yeah. You gotta know this shit about your characters - it’s crucial. 

Tip? If you’re unsure about whether you know what they want, try making a list of all the important characters in your fic (and then potentially do this with most scenes, briefly) and work out what their main motivation/what they want is. Just…in general. In life. And then, once you’re in a scene, see how this plays into what they want in this exact moment, and how they’re going to go about trying to get it. 

Know Your Source Material

You don’t have to be an expert in your fandom to write fanfic, but the more you know, the easier it is to move through the world and build a story, because you know where you’re going and how things work. Wikis are your friend, especially when working in big universes like DW or SW. (Like, hell, I might know a lot about DW, and feel very comfortable in that universe, but I still find myself on the TARDIS Index File all the time, checking little random things. It’s a damn godsend, and every fandom has a wiki.)

Your Characters Are Just People

Make sure you let your characters fuck up once in a while. They’re fallible beings, they’re going to make rash decisions that backfire, they’re going to try something and fail, they’re going to say the wrong thing and piss somebody off. They’re going to maybe mean well but fuck up majorly, and that’s okay, that’s good. Let them apologise, let them learn from the consequences, let the healing of a wound in a relationship bring the people closer together. 

And yes, this still goes for characters that almost never do anything wrong, or are all ‘holier than thou’. They are still gonna go about some things the wrong way. 

Planning Is Good, But Be Flexible 

In my experience, while some people lean heavily towards one or the other, appropriate use of planning or gardening can depend heavily on what kind of story you’re writing. 

When writing more action based storylines, I’ve found it’s very easy to get stuck in the middle of them - you get the characters into a mess and get stuck for a month not knowing how to get them out. This is where planning tends to be handy. A good way of not getting stuck is to plan it all out in little increments, so there’s not too much room to get stuck. Also, plotting from the back. Start at the end. Works really well a lot of the time. 

If planning works for you, plan as much as you want. But, always, always, be ready to change something, if you try a bit of gardening and end up somewhere different to where you expected to be. Always follow what feels right over sticking with a plan. 

Gardening aka Let The Characters Take The Lead

…this is fanfic. Let’s be honest, we know that most of it is juicy interpersonal stuff. So while planning is all well and good, I think gardening works a lot better. When writing the maths teacher fic, I went in pretty much blind. I had a couple of vague ideas of what I wanted to achieve, but I also wanted the relationship I was developing to be as absolutely genuine/believable as possible (which, according to the general consensus, it is). 

The way to do that?

Don’t try and force things between the characters. Sometimes you might start a scene with a particular moment in mind, and that’s all good, but for me personally, I’ve found that you tend to get results that are more organic by simply going into a scene blind and seeing what the characters do. You should still, hopefully, have an idea of what you want to happen, but the characters and their ways of reacting to things should always come first. 

Seriously, if you’ve got the characterisation down, they’ll do the hard work for you. 

Maybe they’ll get to where you wanted, maybe they won’t. But it’s actually a really fun ride, doing it this way. When are they going to kiss? When are they going to fuck? Who knows? Not me! How could I know, when I haven’t yet seen/created the unique and particular path of events that gets them to that point? 

Like, I went into a chapter once, intending for a child character to kill a guy. But when it came to writing the scene, I just wasn’t quite sure if she would actually do it, even with her evil psychopathic mother egging her on. So I gave the kid the reins/gun, and sat back to see what happened. She ended up shooting him non-fatally, only for him to be killed by the vaguely disappointed mother instead. I was like “oh, okay, cool, that works”. 

Garden. Have fun letting the characters surprise you!

Dialogue

Dialogue is the make or break of a story, really. And the trick to dialogue is to make it authentic, and give the characters their own unique voices. 

First one is simple. Make sure the dialogue sounds like how people actually talk. Anyone who has read any of my fics knows that I use “-” and “…” and “um” and “uh” liberally. That’s because humans, modern day ones at least, aren’t always the most eloquent of creatures. We mumble and say the wrong thing, or get distracted halfway through, or forget what we were going to say, and hesitate when we’re unsure (even posh, eloquent characters, they just do it less and use bigger words in between). Let the characters do this. 

Saying the dialogue out loud will help a lot. Also, you could also try verbally paraphrasing a conversation from the fic to a friend, and you’ll likely find some of the dialogue coming out a lot more casually/authentically. 

As for giving the characters their own unique voices, that’s just down to knowing your canon and being in tune with the characters, which is a crucial thing but unfortunately not something I can really give advice on, you’ve gotta get those in your head on your own. 

Details Matter

Different details matter in different stories. And getting them wrong can really break the immersion.

If you’re writing characters that come from a different place to you, make sure you know how people from that place talk! Americans, don’t you fucking dare have a British character call somebody ‘Mom’, it breaks the immersion completely and makes me want to punch something. It’s ‘Mum’, for anyone from UK/Aus/NZ. And same with Brits writing American characters, but the other way around. This goes for any UK/US/Aus/NZ/Canada language difference. Find out what your character calls things.

Working details out can seem unnecessary, or going over the top, but honestly, half the time you realise that you’ve gone and got something wrong, and next thing you know the entire plot has a gaping hole in it, or a character doesn’t know something they got told three months back, but you forgot about it. 

Like, okay, I have a day by day plan of the timeline of the maths teacher fic (and, going forward, its general universe), because I was trying to weave in all this original material through the show canon (and now, write several stories/oneshot set at the same time within that verse, focused on different characters/things), and if I hadn’t done that, I would have royally fucked myself over multiple times. 

I’m not saying everyone has to make a timeline that detailed, because for a lot of stories it wouldn’t be remotely necessary, but it was for this particular one. 

But just details in general. Do your research, check that thing on the wiki, get specific with details about a character, even if they’re just a minor one (though maybe stick to just one or two details, in this case). 

This kind of goes along with show, don’t tell. Like you could tell the readers blatantly that a character loves a thing, or you could talk about how they wearing clothing printed with the thing and have them jabbering on about it excitedly, you know? 

Don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need information!

Seek out people who are experts in something you need to know about. This might be kink (bless the friends I’ve made through fic in the last six months or so, who have helped me in this area), or something specific to their country’s society/culture/choice of words for a certain thing. 

Also, if you’re trying to add diversity in your fics, and you hopefully should be, ask friends or people on Tumblr from within the group you’re trying to include to get information! Want to write a trans guy? Go find a trans guy to talk to about it! (I did this with a demigirl character recently, and got about four or five really helpful people more than happy to give me the info I was looking for, they were really excited about the prospect of demigirl characters existing at all.) It’s really easy to add in background diversity regardless of what fandom you’re writing for, and it can make a lot of difference to any readers who find themselves unexpectedly represented, even if only in a minor or one time character. 

In Conclusion:

Know your characters, and what they want, and how they talk. Let them lead the story, because they’re why you’re here, and doing all this. Give them real and imperfect voices and qualities, and let them make mistakes and apologise.

And do your research, so you get the details right.

I hope this helped! Now, go forth and write!

(And have fun! That’s the other big rule. Do it out of love, make yourself laugh, just have fun with it!) 

6

Some Black Disney + Dreamworks (CGI) Characters + Natural/Afro-Textured Hair [click on each pic for names + movie info]