people rise up

8

Notes:

No.1: GOE +2.71 (*)
No.2: GOE +2.00 (**)
No.3: GOE +2.14 (**)
No.4: Single is the new quad
No.5: “Sure I messed up but it doesn’t matter because I’m Yuzuru Hanyu”
No.6: “I did a #yoloaxel out of an Ina Bauer the other week, how hard can it be to do one out of a hydroblade? ‘kay, turned out it’s pretty hard”
No.7: “Watch me do this impossible thing and watch me sulk when it fails”

(*) Judges were drunk
(**) Judges were hungover from fundraising parties for new prescription glasses

😤😤😤Talos the mighty! 💪💪💪Talos the unerring! 💯💯💯Talos the unassailable! ✊✊✊To you we give praise!🙏🙇🙌

We are but maggots, 🐛🐛writhing 〰in the filth 👣👣👣of our own corruption! 💰💲🚫🔪While you have ascended😱😇 from the dung💩💩 of mortality, 👥💀and now walk among the stars!🌠⭐✨

But you were once man!👨👨👨 Aye!✅✔✅ And as man, 👦👦you said, “Let me show you the power💪💪💪💪 of Talos Stormcrown⚡👑🔱, born of the North,🆙🔝☝ where my breath 💨💨💨is long winter. ❄⛄I breathe😤😧 now, in royalty,💍👑💲and reshape this land🌐🌄 which is mine. I do this for you,👉👉 Red Legions, for I love you💞💞💞.”

Aye, love. ❤❤❤Love! 💓💓💓Even as man,👴👴👴 great Talos cherished us. 😭😢For he saw in us, 👐👐in each of us,👫👬👭 the future of Skyrim! 👏👏The future of Tamriel!👏👏👏

And there it is, friends! 🙏🙏The ugly truth! 🙀🙀🙀We are the children of man! 👦👨👴Talos is the true god😇⛪💒 of man! Ascended 🙌😇from flesh,👃👃👃 to rule the realm of spirit!👻👻👻👻

The very idea is inconceivable to our Elven👱👱👱 overlords! 👺👺Sharing the heavens 🌌🌌with us? With man?👮👷💂 Ha! They can barely tolerate our presence on earth!🌎🌏🌍

Today, they take away your faith.🚫⛪🚫 But what of tomorrow?⁉⁉ What then? Do the elves 👱👱take your homes? 🏠🏠🏠Your businesses? 🏧🏦🏥Your children? 👪👪👪Your very lives?🔪🔪🔪

And what does the Empire do?🏰🏰 Nothing! ❌❌❌Nay, worse than nothing! ❎❎❎The Imperial machine enforces the will of the Thalmor!🙅🙅🙅 Against its own people!😠😠😠😠

So rise up! ☝☝Rise up,👆👆👆 children👶👶👶 of the Empire! 🏰🏰Rise up, 🆙🆙🆙Stormcloaks!💧⚡ Embrace the word of mighty 💪💪Talos, he who is both man and Divine!👼👼👼

For we are the children of man!👶👦👦 And we shall inherit both the heavens🌌🌌🌌 and the earth! 🌎🌏🌍And we, not the Elves👱👱👱 or their toadies, 🐸🐸🐸will rule Skyrim! Forever!💯✔💯

Terrible and powerful Talos! 👑👑👑We, your unworthy servants,🙏🙏🙏 give praise! 🙌🙌🙌For only through your grace and benevolence 💓💓may we truly reach enlightenment!👍👍👍

And deserve our praise you do, 👏👏👏for we are one! 👐Ere you ascended 😇😇😠and the Eight🕗🕗🕗 became Nine, 🕘🕘🕘you walked👣👣 among us, great Talos, not as god, 🚫👼🚫but as man!👲👳💂

Trust in me, Whiterun! 👌👌👌Trust in the words of Heimskr! 👍👍👍For I am the chosen✔✔ of Talos! 👀👀👀I alone have been anointed 💦💦💦by the Ninth 🕘🕘to spread his holy ⛪⛪⛪word!💌💌💌

There’s all these stories of famous mathematicians, physicists, and other scientists, who were poor but by chance got lucky and found, and vastly improved the world of science and mathematics, because they got lucky.

This doesn’t mean that other poor people didn’t just rise up for the community because they weren’t smart enough. No. Capitalist has hindered our scientific and mathematical advancements, everyone poor who vastly contributed to our world all acknowledge how lucky they got, and so many are not afforded this luck.

There are just as many people passionated, dedicated, and clever enough to make further advancements in our society who will never be given the chance to add to our society. That’s what capitalism has done to us. It has made education a thing for the rich and lucky, not for all. If education was for all and failure wasn’t penalized we would move so much further as a society.

I love Hamilton, but something about the way white fans engage with the musical really bothers me: a lot of them are posting in the tag about the actual, historical revolutionaries and founding fathers in a way that makes them seem like funny, sweet, good people. They weren’t. I don’t just mean “Jefferson was a piece of shit”: none of them were good. Every one of their asses saw black people as inferior, even if not all of them supported slavery. All of them participated in genocidal policy against indigenous peoples. If you’re watching/listening to Hamilton and then going out and romanticizing the real founding fathers/American revolutionaries, you’re missing the entire point.

Hamilton is not really about the founding fathers. It’s not really about the American Revolution. The revolution, and Hamilton’s life are the narrative subject, but its purpose is not to romanticize real American history: rather, it is to reclaim the narrative of America for people of colour. 

Don’t romanticize the founding fathers and the revolution. They’re already romanticized. It’s been done. Your history books have already propagated those lies. The revolution is romanticized as an American narrative because it was a revolution lead by and for white men. Their story is the narrative of the nation and it is a narrative from which people of colour are utterly obliterated. 

Do you understand what it’s like to live in a nation where you are made marginal and inconsequential in the historical narrative that you are taught from your first day of school? In the Americas, to be a person of colour is to be made utterly inconsequential to the nation’s history. If you are black, your history begins with slavery, and your agency is denied; they don’t teach about slave rebellions or black revolutionaries. You learn about yourself as entirely shaped by outside forces: white people owned you, then some white people decided to free you and wasn’t that nice of them? and then you’re gone until the civil rights movement. That is the narrative they teach; in which you had no consequence, no value, no impact until less than a century ago. If you are indigenous, you are represented as disappeared, dead, already gone: you do not get to exist, you are already swallowed by history. If you are any other race, you are likely not present at all. To live in a land whose history is not your own, to live in a story in which you are not a character, is a soul-destroying experience.

In Hamilton, Eliza talks, in turn, of “taking herself out of the narrative” and “putting herself back in the narrative.” That’s what Hamilton is about: it’s about putting ourselves in the narrative. It puts people of colour in the centre of the damn narrative of the nation that subjugates them; it takes a story that by all accounts has been constructed to valourize the deeds of white men, and redefines it all. 

Why was the American Revolution a revolution? Why were slave revolts revolts? Why do we consider the founding fathers revolutionaries and not the Black Panthers or the Brown Berets or any number of other anti-racist revolutionary organizations? Whose rebellion is valued? Who is allowed to be heroic through defiance? By making the founding fathers people of colour, Hamilton puts people of colour into the American narrative, while simultaneously applying that narrative to the present. Right now, across the United States, across the damn world, people are chanting “black lives matter.” Black people are shutting down malls and highways, demanding justice for the lives stolen by police, by white supremacy. And all across the world, indigenous people are saying “Idle No More,” blockading pipelines, demanding their sovereignty. And “No One is Illegal” is chanting loud enough to shake down the walls at the border; people are demanding the end of refugee detention centres, demanding an end to the violence perpetuated by anti-immigration policies. People of colour are rising up. 

…And white people are angry about it. White people are saying “if blacks don’t want to get shot by the police they shouldn’t sag their pants”; saying “get over it” about anti-indigenous policies of assimilation and cultural genocide and land theft; Jennicet Gutiérrez was heckled by white gay men for demanding that president Obama end the detention of undocumented trans women of colour. White people see people of colour rising up and they tell us to sit down. Shut up. Stop making things difficult. The American Revolution was a bunch of white men who didn’t want to be taxed, so white history sees their revolutionary efforts as just; they killed for their emancipation from England; they were militant. That, to white people is acceptable. But those same white people talk shit about Malcolm X for being too violent–a man who never started an uprising against the government leading to bloodshed. Violence is only acceptable in the hands of white people; revolution is only okay when the people leading the charge are white. 

Hamilton makes those people brown and black; Hamilton depicts the revolution of which America is proud as one led by people of colour against a white ruling body; there’s a reason King George is the only character who is depicted by a white man. The function of the visual in Hamilton is to challenge a present in which people of colour standing up against oppression are seen as violent and dangerous by the same people who proudly declare allegiance to the flag. It forces white people to see themselves not as the American Revolutionaries, but as the British oppressors. History is happening, and they’re on its bad side.

So don’t listen to or watch Hamilton and then come out of that to romanticize the founding fathers. Don’t let that be what you take away from this show. They’re the vehicle for the narrative, and a tool for conveying the ideologies of the show, but they are not the point. Don’t romanticize the past; fight for the future. 

On the Glorious 25th May - after the brief but incident filled existence of the People’s Republic of Treacle Mine Road - seven men gave their lives doing the job they didn’t have to do:

John Keel, Dai Dickens, Ned Coates, Billy Wiglet, Horace Nancyball, Cecil Clapman and (sort of) Reg Shoe

How Do They Rise Up

Do you see this??

DO YOU SEE??

I’m gonna be 40 years old this year. I was 14 years old when Sonic arrived. I have been in this fandom for 26 years and this is the BEST thing I have seen happen in a very long time.

I had Sonic OCs. I loved them. I still do. I was bludgeoned into submission and stopped talking about them. I watched it happen to other people. I HELPED it happen to other people for a while.

And now. Now, I’m sitting here, practically in tears, because NOW IT’S OKAY. SEGA has said it’s okay. LOOK. Look at all these people rising up from the ashes and dusting themselves and their characters off and re-finding their love of both them and the series.

THIS is how Sonic Forces is going to change things. THIS is how Sonic Forces is ALREADY changing things!!

This is important. This is amazing. I’m an old long time Sonic fan and this makes me so beyond happy I don’t even know what to do with myself.

I think I’m gonna celebrate by drawing my old OCs.

Let’s all help each other finish lifting the stigma some more. Share them! Draw them! Write them! Hell, submit them to me! I wanna see if you have them!

WE ARE THE RESISTANCE!!

Everyone wants a strong woman
until she actually stands up,
flexes her muscles,
projects her voice

Suddenly, she is too much.
She has forgotten her place.

You love those women
as ideas, as fantasies

Not as breathing, living humans
threatening to be even better
than you could ever be
Coup d'état in Venezuela

This is important and needs to be broadcasted all across the globe. This should be trending. Please reblog.

The Venezuelan Supreme Court actually took over the responsibilities of their Parliament, making it powerless. Maduro, the Venezuelan president, is said to have ‘couped himself’ by the opposition (who were majority in the parliament).

As you may know, the South American nation of Venezuela is going through a horrible economic and social crisis. Necessity products can’t be found there, money is basically useless, public services are shit. The government repressed all forms of protests, even the more peaceful ones. This, using the Supreme Court to dissolve the Parliament, is the final straw.

As a fellow South American (Argentinian), I empathize with their situation deeply, so I’m asking you to share this because the world needs to pay attention. Something needs to be done.

The people need to rise up, and the international community must support them through their transition into democracy. They need medical, financial, and all kinds of aid. Let’s stand by them.

5

Endless list of favourite Alec Lightwood scenes - #2
“Robert and Maryse took me in. They raised me as one of their own. I know what kind of people they are.” - Rise Up (1x09)

6

The founding members of The Young Lords party grew up in the NYC projects as the children of working class, Puerto Rican migrants. They were known for their proactive social protest and community activities like burning garbage piles and taking over a church to run a free breakfast program.

The Young Lords began as a Puerto Rican turf gang in the Lincoln Park, Chicago neighborhood of Lincoln Park in the fall of 1960 and as a civil and human rights movement on Grito de Lares, September 23, 1968. During Mayor Daley’s tenure, Puerto Ricans in Lincoln Park and several Mexican communities were completely evicted from areas near the Loop, lakefront, Old Town, Lakeview and Lincoln Park, in order to increase property tax revenues. When they realized that urban renewal was evicting their families from their barrios and witnessed police abuses, some Puerto Ricans became involved in the June 1966 Division Street Riots in Wicker Park and Humboldt Park. They were officially reorganized from the gang into a civil and human rights movement by Jose Cha Cha Jimenez, who was the last president of the former gang and became the founder of the new Young Lords Movement

Latinos of all shades and hair texture came together, not phased by the petty discrimination rife within their community. The Young Lords grew into a national movement through the leadership of activists like Angela Lind Adorno who met with Vietnamese women, Omar López, David Rivera, Field Marshall, Dr. Tony Baez a leader in Bi-lingual, Bi-Cultural Education and Richie Pérez who established the Puerto Rican Student Union (PRSU) in a number of college campuses and high schools.

The Young Lords’ supported independence for Puerto Rico, all Latino nations and oppressed nations of the world and also neighborhood empowerment. This is clear by the original symbol with a map of Puerto Rico and a brown fist holding up a rifle and the purple lettering reading, “Tengo Puerto Rico en mi Corazon” (“I have Puerto Rico in my heart”). They saw themselves as a people’s struggle, a vanguard connected with the masses and it is why they began in Chicago fighting against the displacement of Puerto Ricans from Lincoln Park. While the national symbol and YLO (Young Lords Organization) appeared on buttons, the New York chapter began the local “Garbage Offensive”, which was an organizing vehicle and city-service concern. The Young Lords also addressed the local issues of police injustice, health care, tenants’ rights, free breakfast for children, free day care, and more accurate Latino education. The urban renewal campaign was framed by the Chicago office as the modern day land question, since Emiliano Zapata, who said, “all revolutions are based on land”

Young Lords Party

13-Point Program and Platform:

1. We want self-determination for Puerto Ricans–Liberation of the Island and inside the United States.

For 500 years, first spain and then united states have colonized our country. Billions of dollars in profits leave our country for the united states every year. In every way we are slaves of the gringo. We want liberation and the Power in the hands of the People, not Puerto Rican exploiters.

Que Viva Puerto Rico Libre!

2. We want self-determination for all Latinos.

Our Latin Brothers and Sisters, inside and outside the united states, are oppressed by amerikkkan business. The Chicano people built the Southwest, and we support their right to control their lives and their land. The people of Santo Domingo continue to fight against gringo domination and its puppet generals. The armed liberation struggles in Latin America are part of the war of Latinos against imperialism.

Que Viva La Raza!

3. We want liberation of all third world people.

Just as Latins first slaved under spain and the yanquis, Black people, Indians, and Asians slaved to build the wealth of this country. For 400 years they have fought for freedom and dignity against racist Babylon (decadent empire). Third World people have led the fight for freedom. All the colored and oppressed peoples of the world are one nation under oppression.

No Puerto Rican Is Free Until All People Are Free!

4. We are revolutionary nationalists and oppose racism.

The Latin, Black, Indian and Asian people inside the u.s. are colonies fighting for liberation. We know that washington, wall street and city hall will try to make our nationalism into racism; but Puerto Ricans are of all colors and we resist racism. Millions of poor white people are rising up to demand freedom and we support them. These are the ones in the u.s. that are stepped on by the rules and the government. We each organize our people, but our fights are against the same oppression and we will defeat it together.

Power To All Oppressed People!

5. We want community control of our institutions and land.

We want control of our communities by our people and programs to guarantee that all institutions serve the needs of our people. People’s control of police, health services, churches, schools, housing, transportation and welfare are needed. We want an end to attacks on our land by urban removal, highway destruction, universities and corporations.

Land Belongs To All The People!

6. We want a true education of our Creole culture and Spanish language.

We must learn our history of fighting against cultural, as well as economic genocide by the yanqui. Revolutionary culture, culture of our people, is the only true teaching.

7. We oppose capitalists and alliances with traitors.

Puerto Rican rulers, or puppets of the oppressor, do not help our people. They are paid by the system to lead our people down blind alleys, just like the thousands of poverty pimps who keep our communities peaceful for business, or the street workers who keep gangs divided and blowing each other away. We want a society where the people socialistically control their labor.

Venceremos!

8. We oppose the Amerikkkan military.

We demand immediate withdrawal of u.s. military forces and bases from Puerto Rico, Vietnam and all oppressed communities inside and outside the u.s. No Puerto Rican should serve in the u.s. army against his Brothers and Sisters, for the only true army of oppressed people is the people’s army to fight all rulers.

U.S. Out Of Vietnam, Free Puerto Rico!

9. We want freedom for all political prisoners.

We want all Puerto Ricans freed because they have been tried by the racist courts of the colonizers, and not by their own people and peers. We want all freedom fighters released from jail.

Free All Political Prisoners!

10. We want equality for women. Machismo must be revolutionary… not oppressive.

Under capitalism, our women have been oppressed by both the society and our own men. The doctrine of machismo has been used by our men to take out their frustrations against their wives, sisters, mothers, and children. Our men must support their women in their fight for economic and social equality, and must recognize that our women are equals in every way within the revolutionary ranks.

Forward, Sisters, In The Struggle!

11. We fight anti-communism with international unity.

Anyone who resists injustice is called a communist by “the man” and condemned. Our people are brainwashed by television, radio, newspapers, schools, and books to oppose people in other countries fighting for their freedom. No longer will our people believe attacks and slanders, because they have learned who the real enemy is and who their real friends are. We will defend our Brothers and Sisters around the world who fight for justice against the rich rulers of this country.

Viva Che!

12. We believe armed self-defense and armed struggle are the only means to liberation.

We are opposed to violence–the violence of hungry children, illiterate adults, diseased old people, and the violence of poverty and profit. We have asked, petitioned, gone to courts, demonstrated peacefully, and voted for politicians full of empty promises. But we still ain’t free. The time has come to defend the lives of our people against repression and for revolutionary war against the businessman, politician, and police. When a government oppresses our people, we have the right to abolish it and create a new one.

Boricua Is Awake! All Pigs Beware!

13. We want a socialist society.

We want liberation, clothing, free food, education, health care, transportation, utilities, and employment for all. We want a society where the needs of our people come first, and where we give solidarity and aid to the peoples of the world, not oppression and racism.

Hasta La Victoria Siempre!

The Young Lords were a target of the FBI’s COINTELPRO, which had long harassed Puerto Rican independence groups. The New York-Chicago schism mirrored the “Divide and Conquer” divisions within other New Left groups like the Black Panther Party, Students for a Democratic Society, Brown Berets and many other new left movements. All of these organizations were repressed. At first, the splits were believed to be the result of growing pains, as this movement was very young and spread quickly. But it is now documented that it was primarily due to police infiltration by informants and provocateurs, and planned and shaped by the ongoing undercover work of the FBI’s COINTELPRO

The leaders were framed, beaten, given high bonds, imprisoned, harassed, and discredited. The entire Chicago leadership was forced underground in order to reorganize itself. Tactics against the movements included negative rumor campaigns, pitting groups against each other and the creation of factionalism, distrust and personality conflicts. In Chicago, COINTELPRO created an official anti-Rainbow Coalition component. Members were interviewed in public view in front of the church. The Red Squad was also parked 24 hours a day in front of the national headquarters. Other harassment included inciting quarrels between spouses and between members and allies. The founder and chairman, Jose Cha Cha Jimenez not only was indicted 18 times in a six-week period for felony charges such as assault and battery on police to mob action; he was kept in the county jail, or in court rooms fighting the charges, and received constant death threats. 

While the Young Lords advocated armed strategies similar to those advocated by the Black Panthers, it was as a right of self-defense and rarely arose. It did after the shooting of Manuel Ramos and the implications of police foul play in the circumstances surrounding the beating death of José (Pancho) Lind, the supposed suicide of Julio Roldán in the custody of the NYPD and the fatal stabbings in Chicago of the United Methodist Church Rev. Bruce Johnson and his wife Eugenia, who pastored in Lincoln Park at the Young Lord’s first People’s Church in Chicago. 

The documentary Palante, Siempre Palante! The Young Lords, produced by Young Lord Iris Morales, aired on PBS in 1996. Palante, Siempre Palante! The Young Lords, documents the period from 1969 through the organization’s demise in 1976. The Young Lords represented another cycle of militancy, write Andres Torres and Jose Velasquez in The Puerto Rican Movement: Voices From the Diaspora, a collection of personal narratives from activists of the period. 

In 2015, The Young Lords was the focus of a new art exhibit organized by The Bronx Museum of the Arts called “¡Presente! The Young Lords in New York.” It is on view at three different cultural institutions in New York.

art-johnreach  asked:

What's your response to the ML criticism of anarchism that posits that revolution is an inherently authoritarian process since it involves a class forcing it's will upon another class?

it’s actually older than Marxism-Leninism, this is one of the oldest criticisms of anarchism, first articulated by Engels in his essay “On Authority” in 1872. It’s all built on the false assumption that is something can be described as an exercise of “authority”’ in any sense or from any perspective at all, anarchists are automatically against it.

For communist anarchists like myself, who have politics rooted in class struggle, the observation that a revolution involves “a class forcing it’s will upon another class” is obviously true - but it also leaves out an important bit of context which is that one of those classes is already forcing it’s will on the other. Classes aren’t just free floating discreet groups of people who can either be on the top or the bottom, they are produced and reproduced in relation to one another through specific, violently enforced relations of production.

The way this question is usually framed is as if our antagonism with the bourgeoisie is just a simplistic battle between two sets of people with the same aim - to repress the other by force - but our aims are fundamentally different, it’s about the reinforcement or abolition of class society… and our enemy isn’t just simply the group of people who currently compose the capitalist class, it’s class society itself, and the social relationships that produce and maintain it.

The ultimately violent authority of private property, capital and state is an organizing principle of society which determines every aspect of our lives. We are submitting to authority right now, is it “authoritarian” to stop? If someone has their boot on your neck, is it authoritarian to kick them off? From the perspective of the bosses, sure - the same people who perceive strikes and picket lines as violent incursions on their liberty, for them any sign of people rising up from their knees appears as an act of aggression - if we look at revolution from their perspective, then yes Engels had a point, we are authoritarians and every anarchist who ever punched a nazi or threw a brick at a cop is a huge hypocrite. This is of course the ancap point of view, and I accept that it exists, but it hasn’t really troubled the conscience of communist anarchists through 100 odd years of punching and brick throwing.

Anyway that was a much longer answer than I thought it was going to be, but Iain McKay dedicated a whole section of the anarchist FAQ to refuting this argument:

Didn’t Engels refute anarchism in his essay “On Authority”?

*dies*
*children die*
*grandchildren die*
*entire world unites into global confederation*
*the lizard people rise up and turn out to be benevolent, turn world confederation into perfect luxury space communist state*
*humans and animals live in perfect Bliss for 100,000 years, becoming perfect cyborg transsuperhumans*
*humans eventually transcend space and time and evolve beyond, leaving the Universe as we know it*
*all galaxies crash into each other*
*entropy reaches maximum, heat death of the Universe*
*Kingdom Hearts 3 is released*

10

The neighborhood where I grew up, nothing much changed. People rarely left, rarely got rich. Never got out of their lot in life. The person you were born as was the person you died as. This sickness, this virus, and this wall we built to stop it, has changed people. It makes all of us see things differently. Some people have caved under pressure, and the difficulties they faced have only brought out the worst in them. Other people have risen up and surprised even themselves. New, and sometimes unlikely alliances, have formed. In the search for truth, some found not only answers, but redemption. The very concept of what it means to be a family has been reshaped. Sometimes for the better. And then there are those who felt like they needed to choose between their heart, and their duty, and in the end, found a way to choose both. This cordon has changed me. The one thing I never thought I’d find in all this sadness and sickness and death is love. And I’m going to try harder and be one of the people who rises up. — Jake Riley, Containement

Hello I am Tumblr user Stingeprince, and I decided to make a redraw of this.

Beginner’s Guide to Organizational Materialism

What are you Doing?”-Robbie Rotten

This question that the great Robbie Rotten asked is of absolute importance in times like ours.  What are we doing? Who is it for?  Before us is a dozen struggles, but who is fighting them, and how?

To answer this, we need to look at organizations in a way that is (relatively) rare in the Left.  We need to treat organizations materialistically, which is the point of Organizational Materialism.

In the medium term, in the space in which you and I live our lives, the struggles of society don’t occur abstractly, but within and between organizations.  This isn’t to say that people don’t rise up on their own.  But each time that has happened, over a period of months, those spontaneous activists turn themselves into several dozen organizations, each trying to capture the spirit of that original uprising.

These organizations are crucial, they’re the spaces in which the abstract goals we want–the creation of socialism, the ending of racism, of sexism, or homophobia–turn into concrete things that we can attain or fight for.  But it’s here where things start to get difficult.

At the center of organizational materialism is the idea that organizations structure themselves based around what they do, whether it’s work for votes, organizing actions, feeding people, or writing articles.  This structure creates it’s own reality, which restructures the organization’s goals so that they are amenable to their means.  “Build the party” becomes “write articles about building the party” becomes “write articles criticizing other groups of not building the party correctly”. Steadily, the organization’s activities become more about continuing its own existence than about helping people.

This tendency towards narrowing becomes self reinforcing as the practice a group does and the theory a group creates become in line.  This leads to organizations turning what they do into something that is all important, to denigrate the work of other groups.  “We need to organize this protest” turns into “this protest is all important, protest is all important”.  “We need to get votes to win this election” becomes “me getting voted in is a political revolution”.

How do we fix this?  By being conscious of the correct practices? By reading the right books? By just organizing? No.  These tendencies don’t come out of people not knowing the right stuff, it’s inherent to any given organization. Be conscious of this.   Ask yourself if your goals are to uplift the organization and only the organization or are they to uplift the people in your community.  Because the organization isn’t what’s important on its own, the struggle is, and the way to keep these narrowing tendencies from afflicting the whole movement is to have a diverse group of organizations that do different things.  A revolution is never any one thing, it’s a ton of them, and by working on different fronts, we can create a movement that is broader and focused on what’s really important.