penny4nasa

On this day in 1968, Yuri Gagarin, the first human in space, died never having gotten to see man touch the surface of another world.

In 1961, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first ambassador of our planet to enter the vastness of space. Vostok 1 was the first manned spaceflight of the early space race, and Gagarin completed one orbit of Earth before landing safely 108 minutes later.

While flying weightless above Earth’s surface, Yuri Gagarin witnessed a spectacular view of home — forests, deserts, and great plains were surrounded by expansive oceans. Upon viewing the thin blue line of the atmosphere, Gagarin became the first of our inquisitive species to see our planet as it truly is — a vibrant, geologically active world circling a star. Unfortunately, Yuri died seven years later during a jet crash in 1968, never having gotten to see man touch the surface of another world.

We at Penny4NASA urge you to honor the memory of this brave man, as his Vostok 1 mission was the catalyst for every manned spaceflight to date.

“May well have been one small step for Neil, but it’s a heck of a big leap for me!” - Bruce McCandless

On February 7th, 1984 – the fourth day of STS 41-B – astronauts Bruce McCandless and Robert Stewart performed the first untethered spacewalks, operating the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) for the first time. McCandless, the first human Earth-orbiting satellite, ventured out 320 feet (98 m) from the orbiter, while Stewart tested the “work station” foot restraint at the end of the Remote Manipulator System. On the seventh day of the mission, both astronauts performed an EVA to practice capture procedures for the Solar Maximum Mission satellite retrieval and repair operation, which was planned for the next mission, STS-41-C.

When it landed on Venus on December 15th, 1970, Venera 7 became the first spacecraft to achieve a soft-landing on another planet.

Only able to transmit surface data back to Earth for 23 minutes due to signal degradation, it was determined by Venera 7’s transmission that the atmosphere of Venus is composed 97% of carbon dioxide, with a temperature reading of 887°F (475°C).

On this day In 1961, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first ambassador of our planet to enter the vastness of space. Vostok 1 was the first manned spaceflight of the early space race, and Gagarin completed one orbit of Earth before landing safely 108 minutes later.

While flying weightless above Earth’s surface, Yuri Gagarin witnessed a spectacular view of home – forests, deserts, and great plains were surrounded by expansive oceans. Upon viewing the thin blue line of the atmosphere, Gagarin became the first of our inquisitive species to see our planet as it truly is – a vibrant, geologically active world circling a star. We at Penny4NASA urge you to honor the memory of this brave man, as his Vostok 1 mission was the catalyst for every manned spaceflight adventure to date.

palimpsestpanther  asked:

I've become more and more aware of light pollution and want to be involved in helping end this endless light. When I watched The City Dark, I was struck by the health concerns that I hadn't considered. As someone who enjoys being up at night and must be up for work, I was wondering if there are certain bulbs or light sources we could in our homes so that we wouldn't be suppressing melatonin, but I could still read to wind down once I get home.

Yes there are, and you’ll find a plethora of resources via the International Dark Sky Association.

You may be interested in participating and learning more via the Globe At Night organization as well as my archive of published posts regarding light pollution :)

Also, check out this post from my friends over at Penny4NASA:

55 years ago today, Yuri Gagarin became the first human in space.

In 1961, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first ambassador of our planet to enter the vastness of space. Vostok 1 was the first manned spaceflight of the early space race, and Gagarin completed one orbit of Earth before landing safely 108 minutes later.

While flying weightless above Earth’s surface, Yuri Gagarin witnessed a spectacular view of home — forests, deserts, and great plains were surrounded by expansive oceans. Upon viewing the thin blue line of the atmosphere, Gagarin became the first of our inquisitive species to see our planet as it truly is — a vibrant, geologically active world circling a star. We at Penny4NASA urge you to honor the memory of this brave man, as his Vostok 1 mission was the catalyst for every manned spaceflight adventure to date.

youtube

Penny4Nasa

youtube

‘Fight for Space’ is a project 3 years in the making. From traveling around the country visiting America’s landmarks and enterprises of space commerce to discussing space policy and our spacefaring future potential with those who know it best; we’re incredibly excited and anxious to finally deliver this film to all of our supporters and share this with the world. 

The sole mission of this project is to spur curiosity, innovation, hope. However, the information communicated throughout the film are also meant to anger, disappoint, and - equipped with the greater understanding and insight we provide - embolden and empower you to do precisely what the film suggests: 'Fight’ for Space.

The Planetary Society exists because Congress has removed the very essence and directive of America’s space program through lack of funding. ExploreMars exists because we stopped human exploration during a time when we were gearing up to perform major feats in space beyond our moon. MarsOne earned global attention and over 70,000+ volunteers for a one-way trip to another world because government “leaders” did just the opposite – steer us off course as a society upon which exploration kept us alive. Penny4NASA - volunteer organization - exists and advocates a robustly funded space program because it recognizes NASA as the economic engine responsible for jobs and advancements across multiple scientific fields we now take advantage of on a daily basis.

In order for us to proceed and for the film to reach critical mass whereby everyone can have a fully finished product which fully conveys everything we’ve been building up to accomplish, our Kickstarter campaign needs to achieve its goal. We’re roughly $50,000 and a week away. Your support is encouraged, and remember: achieving our $80K funding goal by Feb. 1 will permit us to send a copy of the finished film to every member of Congress

We’re not trying to make fancy mayo, card games, or stationary. We’re trying to launch a project for present and subsequent generations; to show them that during the most uncertain times, we decided to #FightforSpace.