pella

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The Migdol Temple at Pella in Jordan.

The first photo shows the three major building phases of the temple that stretch from its construction in the Middle Bronze Age (1650 BC) to its destruction in the Iron Age (850 BC).

Second photo: In the foreground a large multi-roomed Iron Age (ca. 900 BC) complex is being excavated, while in the background, work is being undertaken to investigate deposits beneath the Middle Bronze Age temple structure (>1650 BC). Note the massive west exterior wall of the Migdol Temple seen in this image.

Photos courtesy & taken by Ben Churcher, the University of Sydney.

Hunting of deer, detail from the mosaic floor of mosaicist or painter Gnosis in the ‘House of the Rape of Helen’ at Pella, late 4th century. BC, Pella, Archaeological Museum.

Κυνήγι ελαφιού, λεπτομέρεια από το ψηφιδωτό δάπεδο του ψηφοθέτη ή ζωγράφου Γνώσιου στην 'Οικία της Αρπαγής της Ελένης’ στην Πέλλα, τέλος 4ου αι. π.Χ., Πέλλα, Αρχαιολογικό Μουσείο.

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Nearly mint state tetradrachm of Alexander III the Great, minted in Pella, Macedon c. 323-315 BC

This coin shows the head of Herakles right, wearing lion’s skin headress. On the reverse  AΛEΞANΔPOY inscription with Zeus seated left, holding eagle and scepter; in left field, bee atop a rose.

The ruins of Pella are located in the current Pella regional unit of Central Macedonia in Greece. The city was founded in 399 BC by King Archelaus (413–399 BC) as the capital of his kingdom, replacing the older palace-city of Aigai. After this, it was the seat of the king Philip II and of Alexander III (the Great), his son. In 168 BC, it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later, the city was destroyed by an earthquake and eventually was rebuilt over its ruins. By 180 AD, Lucian could describe it in passing as “now insignificant, with very few inhabitants.”

Pella is first mentioned by Herodotus of Halicarnassus (VII, 123) in relation to Xerxes’ campaign and by Thucydides (II, 99,4 and 100,4) in relation to Macedonian expansion and the war against Sitalces, the king of the Thracians. According to Xenophon, in the beginning of the 4th century BC, it was the largest Macedonian city. It attracted Greek artists such the painter Zeuxis, the poet Timotheus of Miletus and the tragic author Euripides who finished his days there writing and producing Archelaus.

More about Pella…

More about the Tetradrachms of Alexander the Great…

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Alexander the Great

Alexander III of Macedon (20/21 July 356 – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great (Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας, from the Greek: ἀλέξω alexo “to defend, help” and ἀνήρ aner “man”), was a King (Basileus/Βασιλιάς) of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty. Born in Pella in 356 BC, Alexander succeeded his father, Philip II, to the throne at the age of twenty. He spent most of his ruling years on an unprecedented military campaign through Asia and northeast Africa, until by the age of thirty he had created one of the largest empires of the ancient world, stretching from Greece to Egypt and into northwest India. He was undefeated in battle and is considered one of history’s most successful military commanders. During his youth, Alexander was tutored by the philosopher Aristotle until the age of 16. When he succeeded his father to the throne in 336 BC, after Philip was assassinated, Alexander inherited a strong kingdom and an experienced army. He had been awarded the generalship of Greece and used this authority to launch his father’s Panhellenic project to lead the Greeks in the conquest of Persia. Read More || Edit

New Museum of Pella Hosts Wealth of Macedonian Empire

The Archaeological Museum of Pella was inaugurated on September 5 by Culture and Sports Minister Kostas Tasoulas with the exhibit “Macedonian Treasures” that will run until September 30, 2015.

The exhibition showcases valuable artifacts from excavations in the area, including royal tombs and the Aegae palace (present-day Vergina), capital of Macedonia’s kingdom, and discoveries from Archontiko (which predated Pella during the 7th and 6th centuries BC, or Archaic times), including gold wreaths, gold masks, jewellery, weapons, sculptures, alabaster objects and vases, among others. Read more.

Pella, Greece

The ruins of Pella are located in the current Pella regional unit of Central Macedonia in Greece. The city was founded in 399 BC by King Archelaus (413–399 BC) as the capital of his kingdom, replacing the older palace-city of Aigai. After this, it was the seat of the king Philip II and of Alexander III (the Great), his son. In 168 BC, it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later, the city was destroyed by an earthquake and eventually was rebuilt over its ruins. By 180 AD, Lucian could describe it in passing as “now insignificant, with very few inhabitants.”

Pella is first mentioned by Herodotus of Halicarnassus (VII, 123) in relation to Xerxes’ campaign and by Thucydides (II, 99,4 and 100,4) in relation to Macedonian expansion and the war against Sitalces, the king of the Thracians. According to Xenophon, in the beginning of the 4th century BC, it was the largest Macedonian city. It attracted Greek artists such the painter Zeuxis, the poet Timotheus of Miletus and the tragic author Euripides who finished his days there writing and producing Archelaus.

More about Pella

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“Macedonian Treasures” exhibition will be inaugurated at Pellas museum on Friday

The “Macedonian Treasures” exhibition will be inaugurated at the Pellas Archaeological Museum in northern Greece on Friday and it is scheduled to run until September 30, 2015.

The unique exhibits recovered from royal graves in the Aiges and Archontiko necropolises include many items which are displayed for the first time in Greece, such as gold wreaths, gold masks, weapons, unique sculptures and vessels of alabaster, metal or pottery that were uncovered over 25 years of archaeological excavation at the two sites.

Some of the antiquities were loaned to major exhibitions held at Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum and at the Louvre in Paris in 2011. Now they will return to their country of origin to win the admiration of the Greek audience.

The exhibition’s aim is to present a comprehensive picture of the civilization that formed in the heart of Macedonia during the Archaic and early Classical eras, at a time of fundamental change that laid the foundations for the later Macedonian kingdoms.