pell grants

lmao the pell grant is losing 3.9 billion in funding under trump, this is so devastating. the pell grant is how a lot of black/brown students can afford college since it pays all mandatory fees, this is a huge failure for cultivating educational futures.

3

In 1978 Waymann Washington had two major things going for him: As a young man, he had his whole life in front of him. He’d also been granted a scholarship to go to college and play football. Two months into school, he dropped out.

Right now he’s serving a six-year sentence at the Richland Correctional Institution in Mansfield, Ohio, for drug trafficking.

And at 59, he’s found college again.

Because of a pilot program introduced by the Obama administration in 2015, inmates across the country, like Washington, have access to federal Pell grants to take college courses and earn certificates, associates and bachelor’s degrees while serving out their sentences.

More than a dozen other inmates at Richland are taking courses alongside Washington through Ashland University in Ohio. Ashland is a Christian liberal arts school about an hour south of Cleveland and has the biggest group of qualifying prisoners in its program. Generally, prisoners must have a release date within five years to qualify.

Earning A 2-Year Degree While Serving A 6-Year Sentence

Photos: Dustin Franz for NPR

10

What a complete shit show. It’s like a scene stolen from Get Out.

NOW can we finally drop kick the Clintons, the DLC and neoliberalism out of the Democratic Party? Can we at least stop pretending that they’re progressives, instead of neoliberals with a “benevolent” plantation owner mentality?

If you haven’t already seen it, now is probably a very very good time to watch 13th, a documentary about how prison labor is legalized slavery.

Bill Clinton was bad enough for Black people: Think about all the harmful anti-Black legislation he actively supported, like the Crime Bill of 1994 (mass incarceration), TANF (gutted welfare), how he signed legislation that blocked Pell Grants from going to prisoners seeking education, to how he blocked parents with drug arrest records from receiving food and housing assistance.

And now remember Hillary’s racist super predators speech (who needed to be “brought to heel” like animals), and how it took her 20 years to give a tepid non-apology, and how she literally had to be BEGGED to stop taking money from the private prison industry. The Clintons are foul.

YES, we still need to get rid of Donald Trump. No one is losing sight of that. But we can chew gum and walk at the same time. To beat Trump by wide margins we need actual progressives in 2018 and 2020. Not Third Way “moderates”. Not centrists. We need—we demand—progressives. By now it should be painfully clear that we can do better than Bill or Hillary Clinton. They are a political gift to Republicans and a liability to progressives. Any political influence that the Clintons hold over the Democratic Party needs to be completely rejected and eliminated. And that includes revamping or eliminating the rigged Super Delegate system.

i really did everything i could to avoid doing this but

i’m a lesbian who was kicked out as a teenager and pretty much completely disowned – i’m 25 now and i’ve been poor as dirt (last year was the first year my income was above the poverty line) the last 7+ years. i worked two jobs, went to school and worked full time, and moved across the country twice with little to no help from my family. even now i make minimum wage with tips. i’m not well off – just as responsible as i can be.

now that i’m 25 i can finally go to school since i don’t have to report my “family” income. based on my own income, pell grants will cover almost all of my school expenses, and working part time + student loans should cover most of my living expenses.

however, i’m going to lose my health insurance in 2 months. i’m nearly out of dental already. i don’t know what i can do yet, because my financial aid for school has been put through the verification process for months and months and lots of paperwork and i don’t know what my period grant is exactly or what kind of student loans i’m applicable for. on top of that, i have to pay $1,130.00 to my University out of pocket because financial aid didn’t come through in time.

i’ve never worked less than full time – in the decade i’ve spent much of it working 2 jobs – but now i’m going less than part time and my job i’ve worked for years won’t even give me so much as health insurance. i’m very scared and i feel like i’m jumping off of a cliff.

i do have credit cards, but with no health insurance and only a part time job i need them for emergencies only. $1k+ is enough to stress my credit out horribly, and i have absolutely no fallback plan. i’m an adult survivor of an abusive homophobic family taking a huge risk by finally going to college like i’ve always wanted to.

i know this is the best thing for me, and i know that my life will improve so much with a degree – and eventually my JD – and i know that i have the potential to do this. i think i might be able to survive on my student loans. but right now… i have absolutely no information. right now im going in blind. and i know this is the best choice for me, but i don’t want to end up struggling or to have everything fall through because of my low income. i make minimum wage (+ tips) and even full time i don’t even know if i can afford books. my father doesn’t speak to me and my mom has nothing she can give me.

my paypal is wishbyspirit@yahoo.com and my squarecash is $wishbyspirit

i’m a lesbian survivor who has lived through hell and is finally trying to do what i know is best for me, but it’s terrifying. everything helps. this is the biggest risk i’ve ever taken in my life, and i’ve sworn to myself that i’ll never be homeless or struggling to eat again, because those struggles have been a reality for years of my life.

thank you all for everything in advance. i appreciate all of the help i can get.

Why can’t kids today just work their way through college the way earlier generations did?

The answer to that question isn’t psychology. It’s math. A summer job just doesn’t have the purchasing power it used to, especially when you compare it with the cost of college.

Let’s take the example of a working-class student at a four-year public university who’s getting no help from Mom and Dad. In 1981-‘82, the average full cost to attend was $2,870. That’s for tuition, fees and room and board.

The maximum Pell Grant award back then for free tuition help from the government was $1,800. That leaves our hypothetical student on the hook for just about $1,000. Add in a little pocket money, too — say $35 a week. That makes an extra $1,820 for the year on top of the $1,000 tuition shortfall.

Now, $3.35 an hour was the minimum wage back then. So, making $2,870 meant working 842 hours. That’s 16 hours a week year-round — a decent part-time job. It’s also about nine hours a day for three straight months — a full-time, seven-day-a-week summer job. Or, more likely, a combination of both. In short: not impossible. Far from it.

For today’s public university student, though, the numbers have all changed in the wrong direction.

Why Summer Jobs Don’t Pay

Illustration: Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Donald Trump wants to eliminate the Department of Education.  That’s not a joke, I’m not being misleading.  More than once he said he wants to make this happen. Please click the read more below to see just some of the consequences.

—Using official budget figures from the Department of Education, CAPAF’s full analysis shows just how far reaching the impact of Trump’s proposals could be on students, teachers, and families. Our analysis examined the largest programs that the agency runs in order to demonstrate what their elimination would mean for the country and for each state. Nationally, according to that analysis:

  • 8 million students every year would lose Pell grants
  • 490,000 or more teacher positions could be eliminated
  • $1.3 trillion in student loans would be at risk
  • 9 million low-income students would lose $15 billion of Title I funding annually
  • 5 million children and students with disabilities would lose $12.7 billion used every year to ensure that they receive a quality education
  • 750,000 or more students from military families, Native American students, students living in U.S. territories, and students living on federal property or Native American lands would lose $1.1 billion per year for their schools
  • 4,000 or more rural school districts would lose more than $175 million used annually to help improve the quality of teaching and learning in many hard-to-staff schools
  • $700 million used by states to support the 5 million English language learners currently in public schools — representing close to 10 percent of all students — would be cut

I want to point out, 750,000 or more students from military families.  Soldiers and their children will struggle because of this.

I want to point out 4,000 or more rural school districts would struggle. 

The working class.  The military.  The farmers of America.   These are the people who supported Trump.  And he’s going to drop them in a heartbeat, because he doesn’t even understand how the education system works.  Or he does, and he doesn’t care.  

Here’s how Betsy DeVos could disproportionately hurt black and Latino students

  • On Tuesday, the Senate confirmed Trump’s education secretary pick Betsy DeVos, despite last-minute efforts by Democrats. 
  • DeVos’ nomination will go down in history for being the first time a vice president voted to split a tie on a cabinet nominee.
  • In her new role, DeVos will be in charge of several programs that will disproportionately damage the educational and financial futures of the nation’s black and Latino students. 
  • Her educational philosophies on student loans, Pell grants and charter schools may mean big trouble for students of color. Read more

follow @the-movemnt

npr.org
Here's The Fine Print On The Country's Biggest-Ever Free College Plan
Freedom's just another word for ... a full-ride scholarship, with strings attached. New York's vast new scholarship program has brought praise, and some nitpicking.
  • It only covers full time students.
  • Families can’t make more than $100,000 a year for the students to be covered (consider the difference in cost of living… you have to be relatively poor to get this scholarship).
  • Students must first apply for, and use, other money like federal Pell Grants, before turning to the scholarship.
  • if you don’t finish on time (2 years for community college, 4 years for 4-year programs), you lose the money… so… most students WILL lose the money and have to get loans to pay for their last year or so.
  • you have to stay in New York post-graduation for the same number of years you received the scholarship… or it retroactively becomes a loan. This is to ensure NY tax payers reap the benefits of paying for your education.
bloomberg.com
Inside Alabama’s Auto Jobs Boom: Cheap Wages, Little Training, Crushed Limbs
The South’s manufacturing renaissance comes with a heavy price.

Regina Elsea was a year old in 1997 when the first vehicle rolled off the Mercedes-Benz assembly line near Tuscaloosa. That gleaming M-Class SUV was historic. Alabama, the nation’s fifth-poorest state, had wagered a quarter-billion dollars in tax breaks and other public giveaways to land the first major Mercedes factory outside Germany. Toyota, Honda, and Hyundai followed with Alabama plants of their own. Kia built a factory just over the border in West Point, Ga. The auto parts makers came next. By the time Elsea and her five siblings were teenagers, the country roads and old cotton fields around their home had come alive with 18-wheelers shuttling instruments and stamped metal among the car plants and 160 parts suppliers that had sprouted up across the state.

A good student, Elsea loved reading, horses, and dogs, especially her Florida cracker cur, named Cow. She dreamed of becoming a pediatrician. She enrolled in community college on a federal Pell Grant, with plans to transfer to Auburn University, about 30 miles from her home in Five Points. But she fell in love with a kindergarten sweetheart, who’d become a stocker at a local Walmart, and dropped out of school to make money so they could rent their own place.

Elsea went to work in February 2016 at Ajin USA in Cusseta, Ala., the same South Korean supplier of auto parts for Hyundai and Kia where her sister and stepdad worked. Her mother, Angel Ogle, warned her against it. She’d worked at two other parts suppliers in the area and found the pace and pressure unbearable.

Elsea was 20 and not easily deterred. “She thought she was rich when she brought home that first paycheck,” Ogle says. Elsea and her boyfriend got engaged. She worked 12-hour shifts, seven days a week, hoping to move from temporary status at Ajin to full time, which would bring a raise from $8.75 an hour to $10.50. College can wait, she told her mom and stepdad.

On June 18, Elsea was working the day shift when a computer flashed “Stud Fault” on Robot 23. Bolts often got stuck in that machine, which mounted pillars for sideview mirrors onto dashboard frames. Elsea was at the adjacent workstation when the assembly line stopped. Her team called maintenance to clear the fault, but no one showed up. A video obtained by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration shows Elsea and three co-workers waiting impatiently. The team had a quota of 420 dashboard frames per shift but seldom made more than 350, says Amber Meadows, 23, who worked beside Elsea on the line. “We were always trying to make our numbers so we could go home,” Meadows says. “Everybody was always tired.”

After several minutes, Elsea grabbed a tool—on the video it looks like a screwdriver—and entered the screened-off area around the robot to clear the fault herself. Whatever she did to Robot 23, it surged back to life, crushing Elsea against a steel dashboard frame and impaling her upper body with a pair of welding tips. A co-worker hit the line’s emergency shut-off. Elsea was trapped in the machine—hunched over, eyes open, conscious but speechless.

No one knew how to make the robot release her. The team leader jumped on a forklift and raced across the factory floor to the break room, where he grabbed a maintenance man and drove him back on his lap. The technician, from a different part of the plant, had no idea what to do. Tempers erupted as Elsea’s co-workers shoved the frightened man, who was Korean and barely spoke English, toward the robot, demanding he make it retract. He fought them off and ran away, Meadows says. When emergency crews arrived several minutes later, Elsea was still stuck. The rescue workers finally did what Elsea had failed to do: locked out the machine’s emergency power switch so it couldn’t reenergize again—a basic precaution that all factory workers are supposed to take before troubleshooting any industrial robot. Ajin, according to OSHA, had never given the workers their own safety locks and training on how to use them, as required by federal law. Ajin is contesting that finding.

An ambulance took Elsea to a nearby hospital; from there she was flown by helicopter to a trauma center in Birmingham. She died the next day. Her mom still hasn’t heard a word from Ajin’s owners or senior executives. They sent a single artificial flower to her funeral.

(Continue Reading)

where was your suffering?

Facebook gets a bad rap, but there’s a lot of serious shit going down there these days.  Via a friend’s reposting:


From Scott Mednick, when a Facebook friend told him, “We suffered for 8 years. Now it’s your turn.”

Scott’s reply:


"I am surprised you would wish suffering upon me. That of course is your right, I suppose. I do not wish harm on anyone. Your statement seems to continue an ‘US v THEM’ mentality. The election is over. It is important to get past campaigning and campaign rhetoric and get down to what is uniting not dividing and what is best for ALL Americans.

There will never be a President who does everything to everyone’s liking. There are things President Obama (and President Clinton) did that I do not like and conversely there are things I can point to that the Presidents Bush did that I agree with. So I am not 100% in lock step with the outgoing President but have supported him and the overall job he did.

And, if you recall, during the Presidential Campaign back in 2008 the campaign was halted because of the "historic crisis in our financial system.” Wall Street bailout negotiations intervened in the election process. The very sobering reality was that there likely could be a Depression and the world financial markets could collapse. The United States was losing 800,000 jobs a month and was poised to lose at least 10 million jobs the first year once the new President took office. We were in an economic freefall. So let us recall that ALL of America was suffering terribly at the beginning of Obama’s Presidency.

But I wanted to look back over the last 8 years and ask you a few questions. Since much of the rhetoric before Obama was elected was that he would impose Sharia Law, Take Away Your Guns, Create Death Panels, Destroy the Economy, Impose Socialism and, since you will agree that NONE of this came to pass,

I was wondering:
Why have you suffered so?

So let me ask:
Gays and Lesbians can now marry and enjoy the benefits they had been deprived of. Has this caused your suffering?

When Obama took office, the Dow was 6,626. Now it is 19,875. Has this caused your suffering?

We had 82 straight months of private sector job growth - the longest streak in the history of the United States. Has this caused your suffering?

Especially considering where he the economy was when he took over, an amazing 11.3 million new jobs were created under President Obama (far more than President Bush). Has this caused your suffering?

Obama has taken Unemployment from 10% down to 4.7%. Has this caused your suffering?

Homelessness among US Veterans has dropped by half. Has this caused your suffering?

Obama shut down the US secret overseas prisons. Has this caused your suffering?

President Obama has created a policy for the families of fallen soldiers to have their travel paid for to be there when remains are flown home. Has this caused your suffering?

We landed a rover on Mars. Has this caused your suffering?

He passed the Matthew Shepard Hate Crimes Prevention Act. Has this caused your suffering?

Uninsured adults has decreased to below 10%: 90% of adults are insured - an increase of 20 Million Adults. Has this caused your suffering?

People are now covered for pre-existing conditions. Has this caused your suffering?

Insurance Premiums increased an average of $4,677 from 2002-2008, an increase of 58% under Bush. The growth of these
insurance premiums has gone up $4,145 – a slower rate of increase. Has this caused your suffering?

Obama added Billions of dollars to mental health care for our Veterans. Has this caused your suffering?

Consumer confidence has gone from 37.7 to 98.1 during Obama’s tenure. Has this caused your suffering?

He passed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act. Has this caused your suffering?

His bi-annual Nuclear Summit convinced 16 countries to give up and destroy all their loose nuclear material so it could not be stolen. Has this caused your suffering?

He saved the US Auto industry. American cars sold at the beginning of his term were 10.4M and upon his exit 17.5M. Has this caused your suffering?

The deficit as a percentage of the GDP has gone from 9.8% to 3.2%. Has this caused your suffering?

The deficit itself was cut by $800 Billion Dollars. Has this caused your suffering?

Obama preserved the middle class tax cuts. Has this caused your suffering?

Obama banned solitary confinement for juveniles in federal prisons. Has this caused your suffering?

He signed Credit Card reform so that rates could not be raised without you being notified. Has this caused your suffering?

He outlawed Government contractors from discriminating against LGBT persons. Has this caused your suffering?

He doubled Pell Grants. Has this caused your suffering?

Abortion is down. Has this caused your suffering?

Violent crime is down. Has this caused your suffering?

He overturned the scientific ban on stem cell research. Has this caused your suffering?

He protected Net Neutrality. Has this caused your suffering?

Obamacare has extended the life of the Medicare insurance trust fund (will be solvent until 2030). Has this caused your suffering?

President Obama repealed Don’t Ask Don’t Tell. Has this caused your suffering?

He banned torture. Has this caused your suffering?

He negotiated with Syria to give up its chemical weapons and they were destroyed. Has this caused your suffering?

Solar and Wind Power are at an all time high. Has this caused your suffering?

High School Graduation rates hit 83% - an all time high. Has this caused your suffering?

Corporate profits are up by 144%. Has this caused your suffering?

He normalized relations with Cuba. Has this caused your suffering?

Reliance on foreign oil is at a 40 year low. Has this caused your suffering?

US Exports are up 28%. Has this caused your suffering?

He appointed the most diverse cabinet ever. Has this caused your suffering?

He reduced the number of troops in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Has this caused your suffering?

Yes, he killed Osama Bin Laden and retrieved all the documents in his possession for analysis. Perhaps THIS caused your suffering?

From an objective standpoint it would appear that the last 8 years have seen some great progress and we were saved from a financial collapse. Things are not perfect. Things can always be better. We are on much better footing now than we were in 2008.

I look forward to understanding what caused you to suffer so much under Obama these last 8 years.“

Ten Ways To Pay For College Right Now

Sometimes, the hardest part is simply knowing where to begin. Here are some tips:

1) Fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form, even if you don’t think you’ll qualify.

2) Apply for national grants. Options include Pell Grants, Academic Competitiveness Grants and National SMART Grants.

3) Apply for local scholarships. Civic organizations and religious institutions often have meaningful amounts of aid to dole out.

4) Getting into more than one school translates to a higher likelihood of receiving a big financial aid package.

5) Bargain! Even schools that only provide need-based aid sometimes come up with drastically different offers.

6)  AmeriCorps, Peace Corp, National Health Services Corps and ROTC programs offer college money in exchange for a service commitment.

7) Look abroad. At Scotland’s St. Andrews, U.S. students pay only $21,650.

8) Stay home. Starting out at a low-cost community college and transferring to a four-year college for the final two years will wipe away a hefty chunk of room and board costs, as well as some tuition.

9)  The American Opportunity Tax Credit and the Lifetime Learning Credit are two excellent options.

10)  Don’t forget to consult your local expert – guidance counselors are often aware of options you may not have considered; best of all, their help is free.

Read more.

wade's big cry for help thank you

hi everyone.

if you follow me on twitter, you might know i’m trying to go back to school starting in october (i’ve aready been accepted and enrolled- it’s a 9 month massage therapy program and i’m very excited about it). you also probably know i was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis earlier this year. my doctors bills and on/off ability to work have blown through most of my savings.

i have covered most of my tuition (via loans/pell grant/savings), but i need another $360 to finish paying for admission and to help cover another doctor’s visit because my insurance is maxed out.

if you would like to donate, my paypal is paypal.me/wadeebooks

i’m also more than happy to do art commissions. you can check http://kingsoftheimpossible.tumblr.com/tagged/my%20doodles for examples, and i do watercolors which you can find examples of on my twitter. commissions tend to run from $15-$20 because i’m not Super Good but it’s nice to get something for giving something. (if you’ve commissioned me already, please know i’m beyond grateful and working on it).

i will say, if anything happens and i cannot return to school/plans fall through: i will return anything that’s donated. if you have any questions, please feel free to send me an ask or, for a much faster response, dm me on twitter (@wade_ebooks).

finally: please don’t feel pressured. if it doesn’t happen, it doesn’t happen, and i can’t stress enough how thankful i am for how much all of you have helped me in the past. thank you so, so much.

College WordBank!

There are a lot of words that may seem new and weird throughout college applications, so here is a list of words that I defined in order to help you glide through the application process!

The Basics: Treat Yo Self! (and know the facts!)


1. Undergraduate: An undergraduate student is someone who is obtaining an undergraduate education or degree, such as a Bachelor’s degree.

2. Private University: A Private University is a college that is privately funded. They tend to be smaller than public universities as well.

3. Public University: A Public University is a college that is publicly funded, specifically through the national government. They tend to be larger than private universities.

4. Safety School: When applying to colleges, a safety school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is lower than your stats, which indicates that it may be easier for you to get in (since you have higher stats than the average).

5. Target School: A target school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is similar to your stats, which indicates that you are the same level as other applicants.

6. Reach School: A reach school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is higher than your stats, indicating that it is a more competitive college.

7. College Confidential: A website full of threads and information about college admissions. Although some of the pages found on College Confidential are helpful, there are some things found on this site that may discourage you for no apparent reason, such as “Chance Me” threads. Therefore, I advise you to steer clear of College Confidential and, by all means, do not let it get to your head!

8. “Chance Me’s”: “Chance Me” are threads found online where people write their stats and ask for others to see if they can get accepted to a specific college. I advise you NOT to trust these things, as people online do not know your chances of getting into a specific school.

9. Common App: Also known as the Common Application, the Common App is an application used for undergraduate admissions to a multitude of colleges. A majority of colleges accept the Common App, but I suggest looking in on the ones you want to apply to in order to know for sure.

10. Universal College Application: Similar to the Common App, the Universal College Application is also a site used by many people to send their college applications.

11. SAT II’s: Also known as SAT Subject Tests, the SAT II’s are exams that are taken in specific subject areas, such as Biology, Math I/II, and US History. Many colleges do not require SAT Subject Tests. However, it is important to check and see if some colleges require you to take an SAT Subject Test, or if it is optional. Although it may be optional for the college, it is still your decision if you would like to take this exam or not for admission purposes.

12. Transcript: A report of all the grades you have received in each class that you have taken during high school. Colleges require an official transcript to be sent to the admissions office.

13. Recommendation Letter: A letter that details why you are an excellent fit in said college. These letters usually come from teachers, faculty, coaches, mentors, etc. Recommendation letters should NOT be written by a family member.

14. Personal Statement: A Personal Statement is basically a college essay. Many colleges require you to write at least one, while others require more than one essay.

15. Need Blind Admissions: Need-Blind Admissions is when colleges will decide on your admissions decision without looking at your financial information. To clarify, this means that the college will decide on your admissions decision solely on your application and not on your financial information.

16. Waitlisted: Waitlisted is sort of the middle ground for colleges. When you are waitlisted, it does not mean that you are accepted or rejected. Instead, it means that you are put on a “waiting list” and, if the colleges enrollment numbers from their accepted students are lower than expected, they will accept more people from the waitlist.  

17. Deferred: Deferred is when a college pushes your application to the next filing period. This means that you have not been accepted or rejected yet. Instead, the college has pushed your application in order to review it again and make a final decision. A deferral only happens if you have applied Early Action or Early Decision.

18. Legacy (Applicant): A legacy applicant is someone who is applying to a college that a family member has went to, usually their parents.


Types of Applications (it’s “ED” as one, two, three! Get it!?)


1. ED/Early Decision: A type of application filing period where you are able to apply early, but it is binding. This means that if you are accepted to said college under Early Decision, you are required to go there upon acceptance. Usually, the application deadline is in November and admission decisions are in Mid-December. Something to note about this is that you can apply to only one school with an “Early Decision” (since it is binding), but you can apply to other schools with a different filing period, such as Early Action and Regular Decision.

2. EA/Early Action: A type of application filing period where you are able to apply early, but it is not binding. This means that you are applying earlier than the normal application period and you will NOT be required to go to said college upon acceptance. Similar to ED, Early Action’s deadline is around November, but the admissions decision’s date varies. Unlike the Early Decision, you can apply to as many Early Action’s as you want (unless Single Choice Early Action, more on that below)

3. Single Choice/Restrictive Early Action: This is a type of application filing period where you are only allowed to apply to one Early Action school. However, this means that Single Choice/Restrictive Early Action is still non-binding (not required to go upon acceptance), but you can only apply to one school under Early Action. Similar to ED, you are able to apply to colleges under other types of filing periods, such as Regular Decision.

4. RD/Regular Decision: This is the normal time when applications are due. Regular Decision is the time when most people apply to colleges. The applications are usually due in January and results typically come out in March (although, it may vary depending on the college). Regular Decisions are non-binding and you can apply to as many as you want.

5. Rolling Admissions: This is a type of application filing period when you apply to a college and the college admissions office reviews them as they receive the applications. Unlike ED/EA/RD, Rolling Admissions does not have a set date where you can go and look for your college admissions decision. Typically, the college will give you a time frame in which they will give you your admission decision, which is possibly around 2-8 weeks depending on the college. Something to note is that a lot of colleges with Rolling Admissions may not have a distinct deadline for the application, but they will have a “priority deadline” where, if you submit your application before that date, then they will get back to you sooner. Overall, the earlier you submit your application for Rolling Admissions, the quicker you will know your decision.

6. Open Admission: This is a type of application filing where colleges accept all students, as long as they have completed high school or have a GED.


Financial Aid: Dolla Dolla Bills Y'All!


1. Grant: A grant is money that you receive in your financial aid packet that you will NOT have to pay back.

2. Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back.

3. Scholarships: A scholarship is money earned due to certain achievements, such as academic, athletic, etc. Similar to a grant, it is money given to you that you do not need to pay back. However, for a scholarship, it may be awarded by the college or awarded separately by applying for one.

4. FAFSA: Also known as the “Free Application for Federal Student Aid”, the FAFSA is a website that most colleges will advise you to use in order to receive financial aid from colleges. The FAFSA application will ask for information on your household’s tax forms in order to determine how much grant and loan money you may receive. The FAFSA application opens on January 1st of every year, but deadlines for completing the application varies for every college. Something to note is that you will need to apply for Financial Aid every year in order to receive aid while you are in college.

5. CSS Profile: Also known as the “College Scholarship Service Profile”, the CSS Profile is found on the College Board website where you apply in order to receive more financial aid. Many colleges require the CSS Profile (and sometimes early on), so I advise you to see if it is required.

6. Expected Family Contribution (EFC): This is a number found on your FAFSA that provides an estimate of the amount of money your family will be expected to pay for your education. To note, this estimate is the amount of money you will be expected to pay after financial aid is accounted for.

7. Institutional Grant: An institutional grant is money given by the college that you do not have to pay back. This is different compared to the federal grant, since the federal grant is provided by the government instead of the college itself.

8. Merit-Based Grants: These are grants that are made due to academic achievement.

9. Need-Based Grants: These grants are given to students due to their level of income.

10. Federal Pell Grant: This grant is money that the federal government gives you that you will NOT pay back.

11. Institutional Loans: An institutional loan is money given by the college that you have to pay back. This is different than the federal loans, since the federal loans are provided by the government instead of the college itself.

12. Direct Subsidized Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back to the college. The Direct Subsidized Loan is a federal loan that pays the loan’s interest while you are in college. However, once your undergraduate education is completed, you will be required to start paying the Direct Subsidized Loan (Note: this loan allows a six month grace period before you starting paying).

13. Direct Unsubsidized Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back to the college. The Direct Unsubsidized Loan is a federal loan that does not pay the loan’s interest while you are in college. This means that, as you continue through college, you are responsible for paying the loan’s interest. However, if you decide you don’t want to pay the loan’s interest while in college, then the interest will be added to the principal (or the original loan’s amount).

14. Perkins Loan: The Perkins Loan is given to students depending on their school, as some schools do not participate in the Perkins Loan. Similar to all loans, it is money borrowed now that must be paid back later. However, unlike the other loans stated here, this loan is a college issued loan instead of a federal loan, meaning that the money is paid back to the college not the government.

15. (Parent) PLUS Loan: A PLUS Loan is a loan taken out on the parents name for an undergraduate student. This means that parents with undergraduate students may use this money for college expenses. PLUS Loans are to be paid back to the federal government.

16. Work Study Program: The Work Study Program is one in which a student may hold a job on campus while earning their degree/education. You can apply for the Work Study Program through the FAFSA application. The money you earn from this job can be used on anything, from tuition to food, etc.


You’re In College! Now what… (Everything you need to know while in college)


1. Major: A specific area that an undergraduate student focuses on during college. The student must follow and complete the courses stated in their specified major in order to receive their degree.  

2. Minor: Although it is not required, some undergraduate students choose a minor in order to have a secondary focus. If you choose to minor, you do not receive another degree. Instead, minoring in something during college is solely for your own personal interest and to expand your knowledge.

3. Double Major: When you double major in something it means that you are following two specified areas. Double Majors receive two degrees for the areas in which they studied.

4. Undeclared: To be undeclared in college is to not choose a major/degree. Many people go into college undeclared, while some are even undeclared up until their second year of college. However, depending on your college, there may be a specific time or deadline to declare a major, since you will eventually be required to have one in order to obtain a degree.

5. Placement Test: A placement test is a preliminary test in order to see what level you are in specific subjects. These are normally taken when you have selected a college to attend (as an entering college freshman) and must register for classes. Also, something to note, all colleges do not have placement tests.

6. Bursar Office: The Bursar Office is the branch of the college that takes care of payments and billing statements for the student.

7. Financial Aid Office: The Financial Aid Office is the branch of the college that takes care of the financial aid aspect for the student, such as determining grant money.

8. Registrar: The Registrar Office is where they handle student records and scheduling for the college.

9. Commuting/Commuter: A commuter is a student who travels to college from where they reside. This is a longer distance than the typical five minutes off campus.

10. Transfer Student: A transfer student is someone who is changing from one college to another. Most people who change colleges decide once they know that their credits will transfer to the next college.

Opioid abuse by white people is considered a health or addiction issue that ruins potential and harms families, but crack cocaine used in black communities was treated as a criminal issue that was nothing less than an existential threat to America.

We won’t see any mass incarceration crime bills targeting white people addicted to prescription drugs and heroin. No politician is going to make speeches calling white people superpredators. Congress won’t pass laws intended to block white people from receiving food assistance, or housing assistance, or Pell grants, just because they had an addiction problem.

Empathy, access to drug intervention programs and multiple second chances for white people, but dehumanization, punishment and more punishment for black people. “Tough on crime” is code for tough on black people. America didn’t get more compassionate towards drug users since the 1990s, it just values white people more than black people. A lot more.

This is what we mean by “two Americas,” there is one set of rules and harsher penalties for black people, and another set of rules and compassion for white people.

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President Rosenberg advocates for Pell Grants in D.C.

Florida International University President Mark B. Rosenberg joined U.S. senators, college presidents and college students in advocating for protecting Pell Grants at a news conference on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, July 19. U.S. Senators Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin, both from Maryland, joined Rosenberg and seven other university presidents from institutions with significant minority populations to highlight the importance of Pell Grants to the nation’s economic prosperity. Dozens of college students also attended to tell lawmakers how important Pell Grants are to their ability to achieve economic mobility and help the U.S. maintain a competitive labor force. In South Florida, 60,000 students currently receive Pell Grants.

I am 20. I am about to start my junior year of college at Western Washington University. I owe roughly $20,000 in student loans. In two weeks I turn 21 and can finally legally drink away the pain of said loans.

I worked full-time this summer. I cleaned the campus apartments. At orientation for the job my supervisor, an employee of the university, all but said custodial experience would be of more use to us post-graduation than our degrees.

I am creating my own major through Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies, a small liberal arts college within Western. I will be integrating studying literature, film, and media. Yes, I plan on going to graduate school so save your lament about my “useless” degree for someone who cares.

This year I will be working two jobs. The first is my Work-Study position at Western’s Department of Journalism. The second is a new job as a “writing assistant” at The Writing Center, a specialized tutoring center at Western for academic writing. I will be working the maximum allotted hours for a student employee and making approximately $190 a week.

There is nowhere in the world I would rather be right now than college. I am willingly digging myself into a financial hole to attend Western, not only to get an education, but to make a life for myself in which I won’t have to watch my child dig him or herself into debt just to learn about what they love.

I believe in college. I believe in investing into education. So why doesn’t it seem to believe in me?