pejoration

WATCH THIS: MAN SHUTS DOWN ANTISEMITIC WHITE POWER PREACHER

So my friend Ondi, who still lives in the Boston area, took this video and gave me permission to post it. She writes: “ I stood there for twenty minutes, easily. Hitler Youth kept trying to preach about “the evils of the Jews” and the big guy barely let him get a word in edgewise. At one point, the big guy yelled, “I will be here ALL DAY” and the crowd cheered.”

I promise this will be the best thing you see today.

ETA 1: Just to clarify, I think when my friend wrote “Hitler Youth” she was using it as a pejorative nickname for the preacher (because he’s young, neatly dressed, and spouting anti-Jewish hate speech). I don’t think she meant he was actually affiliated with a new wave of the Hitler Youth as an organization—although he’s obviously a raging antisemite, so who the fuck knows.

ETA 2: It turns out that while my friend is a Boston-area resident, this video was taken during a visit to New York. My mistake—I just assumed the video was filmed in the area where she lived, but that was incorrect.

ETA 3: As stated above, my friend Ondi took this video and gave me permission to post it. If you are going to share this video elsewhere on the internet, you need to contact me to get permission from my friend.

compose-myself  asked:

I know you get a lot of crap about the Wesley character, but I've recently introduced my 9yo niece to TNG, and he's one of her favorite characters. We just started S2 and she keeps bubbling about how excited she is to see him go to the Academy and get his uniform. She's disappointed if he's not in an episode. Her enthusiasm reminds me how much I adored him as a little girl. People use the term "kid-appeal character" as a pejorative, but you were *good* at it. Just wanted to let you know 😊

I really love this. Thank you for sharing it with me. 

Please tell your niece that I talked with Wesley, and he wanted me to tell her: “You can be anything you want, do anything you want, and don’t ever let someone tell you what you can’t do in your life. Don’t give up when things get hard, because everything worth doing is hard! If I can drive the Enterprise, so can you.”

15 French Slang Words Every French Learner Should Know 🌻

1. Bordel

Bordel literally means brothel. However, these days bordel is more commonly used to describe a large mess. An example would be: Range ta chambre. C’est le bordel. Clean your room. It’s a mess.

2. Balle

Balle as a singular, literally means bullet. Yet back in the day, balles was used as a slang word for francs, the French currency pre-2002. And when France moved on to the euro, balles moved with it and it is still sometimes used in reference to money. An example would be: J’aime ton pantalon. Merci. Je l’ai acheté au marché pour quinze balles. I like your pants. Thanks. I bought them at the market for 15 euros.

3. Baraque

The word baraque literally means shanty, or small house made of planks. However, recently the term has been adapted to refer to a house, or, as an adjective, baraqué,  someone who is really muscular.  For example: On habite dans une grosse baraque avec 10 colocs. We live in a large house with 10 other people. En règle générale, les joueurs de rugby sont plus baraqués que les joueurs de foot. Generally speaking, rugby players are more muscular than football players.

4. BG

These days BG is a popular acronym. It stands for beau gosse, which means hot guy. Gosse on it’s own though is slang for a child though so watch out! If you’re in Quebec, gosse is feminine and carries an entirely different connotation as a slang word for a part of the male anatomy that is generally used in the plural… So if you’re planning to use your slang in Canada, be aware of that difference, since there could be a few misunderstandings!

5 . BCBG

Another popular acronym, which is the French slang for preppy, is BCBG (bien chic bon genre).

6. Blé

Blé literally translates as wheat in English. However, figuratively it has become a popular way of referring to money. (Another common way of referring to money in slang terms is fric or pognon). Here is an example: Il gagne beaucoup de blé. He earns a lot of money.

7. Bobo

Bobo is actually baby talk for une blessure (an injury). However, you will find that young people commonly use this term when referring to minor injuries such as cuts and bruises. An example might be: Qu’est-ce qu’il y a? J’ai un bobo sur le pied. What’s the matter? I have a scratch on my foot.

8. Bouffer

Bouffer literally means to puff up or balloon in size. However, it has become common practice to replace the word manger (to eat) with bouffer in everyday speech. And in turn, la bouffe is then used as another word for food. Here is an example: J’ai trop mangé. J’ai bouffé un steak tartare avec des frites suivi d’une grosse tarte aux pommes. I ate too much. I ate a steak tartare with fries followed by a big slice of apple tart. Je suis allé en ville pour acheter de la bouffe. I went into town to buy some food.

9. Une clope

A commonly used slang word, especially in Paris, is the argot for cigarette; une clope. For example: T’aurais pas une clope? You don’t happen to have a cig, do you?

10. Kiffer

Another term used by today’s generation, which you may not already know is the word  kiffer, which is slang for to like something (it works best with a hobby!). However, pay attention, if you kiffe quelqu’un, it implies that you desire that person. Here’s an example: Je kiffe faire de la voile. I really enjoy sailing. Je kiffe ton frère. I like your brother. (I’m romantically interested in him).

11. Mec

The word mec is yet another commonly used slang term, and refers to boyfriends as well as guys in general. For example: Il est beau, ce mec.That guy is good-looking. Tu viens avec ton mec? Are you bringing your boyfriend? 

Another type of slang that you might come across is verlan, which are French words spelled backwards, and often incorrectly, in slang. And while this concept might seem a bit intimidating at first, you will find that you pick it up in no time at all and probably without even realizing.

12. Meuf

Our first example is meuf, which was originally femme. And, as with the word femme, this term can be used to refer to a female, or your girlfriend, although it can have pejorative connotations.

13. Relou

Our second example is relou, the verlan for lourd (heavy or taxing) and equivalent of chiant, which means annoying/exasperating. Here’s an example: C’est trop relou! That sucks!

14. Ouf

Ouf is literally the French translation of the interjection phew as well as meaning crazy/awesome in verlan, being the backwards of fou (crazy/awesome). On a fait un truc (de) ouf hier. *Here ’ouf’ can work as either an adjective, without the ’de’, or as a noun, with the ’d’. It’s up to you! We did something crazy awesome yesterday.

15. être vénère

And finally, our last slang word for today is another way of expressing that you are annoyed or angry; être vénère, which is the verlan of être énervé. An example would be quite simple: Mathieu est vénère. Matthew is annoyed. (It is important here to pay attention to your accents because vénéré means to be revered).

Masterpost: Autism and Vocabulary

As a writer, we’re sure you are aware that words are important. You can’t always substitute one for another because they all have their own depth of meaning and their own subtleties. So if you want to write an autistic character, you’ll have to refer to autism using the right words. This post will help you do just that!

Autistic person? Person who has autism? Which one should I use?

This is a highly debated question. You might have heard “You have to say “person with autism” because you’re talking about a person first; the person is not defined by their disability!”. While this is a nice thought, it is largely misguided, and this way of talking are mainly used by non-autistic persons while talking about us. The autistic community doesn’t like this “person-first” language very much for several reasons.

First of all, if you need to use specific language to remind yourself that we are people, you may have a problem that no amount of linguistic workarounds can solve. We say “a French person”, not “a person who is French” or “a person with Frenchness”, because we don’t need to remind ourselves that French people are people. Why should it be different with autistic people?

The second reason most of us don’t like saying we are “persons with autism” is that our autism is not something that we carry with us. We are not a human person + a terrible disorder. We are fundamentally different. Being autistic is an integral part of who we are as people, and touches every sphere of our lives. If someone somehow managed to take away our autism, they wouldn’t reveal the “real us” that was hidden behind it: they would create a whole different person. We can’t be separated from our autism, and this should be reflected in the language you use while talking about us.

So ideally, you’ll want to use “autistic”, as an adjective: Cat is autistic, they are an autistic person. Some of us sometimes use “autistic” as a noun as a shortcut, when we’re tired of repeating “people” all the time, but it’s best to avoid it when you can, especially if you’re allistic.

What you really need to avoid is “a person with autism”, or heaven forbid “a person who happens to have autism”, “a person who suffers from autism”, “a person who lives with autism”, or any variation thereof. I’ve also seen a few people write “an autist”, but I don’t get why they do that. Please don’t do it.

And please don’t refer to us as being “on the spectrum,” we don’t need a euphemism to soften the blow of the word “autistic.” We are autistic! Even those who don’t seem disabled. Please remember that, while it is all too often misused in an insulting or pejorative way, “autistic” is not a bad word. Don’t be afraid to use it! In fact, using it more and in a positive way is the best way to stop it from being misused as a pejorative.

You keep using these words I don’t understand…

Alright, let’s get a glossary going! We’ll update this post whenever we use a word that could be hard to understand (if we can remember to do it…). If there is any word on the blog that you can’t understand, check if we’ve explained it here. If we haven’t, shoot us an ask and we’ll do it ASAP. :)
All of the titles are clickable and will take you to the corresponding tag so you can check out everything we’ve written about a subject.

AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Encompasses all means of communicating used by nonverbal people which are not spoken/sign language, such as using a text-to-speech device or a pictogram system to communicate.

ABA: Applied Behaviour Analysis, the most common type of “therapy” autistic children are subjected to. It can have lots of negative long-terms effects on the person’s life, such as PTSD or vulnerability to abuse.

Ableism: Treating disabled people (including autistic people) poorly because they are disabled.Treating someone differently because they behave in autistic ways, punishing autistic people for stimming, forcing nonverbal autistics to communicate verbally (and ignoring other types of communication), etc. are all examples of ableist behavior.

Alexithymia: Difficulty identifying one’s own emotions, very common in autistic people. They may not know how they feel at all, or simply unable to name their feelings. They are often unable to answer the question “How are you?” or “How are you feeling?” and may be aware only of whether they are feeling “good” or “bad” (and sometimes not even that).

Allistic: Someone who is not autistic. Used as an adjective and sometimes as a noun.

Asperger’s Syndrome: An outdated diagnostic term for an autistic person who is generally able to communicate verbally at a typical age and shows interest in social relationships. This is no longer considered to be a thing which exists. (See our masterpost on functioning labels.)

Autistic: Someone who is autistic (ie the subject of this whole blog) (I don’t know why we added that to the glossary)

Cure Culture / Curism: The attitude held by many allistic groups (most notably the hate group “Autism Speaks”) that autism is a disorder or disease which should be eliminated from the human race and place a priority on “curing” it. This is similar to the old belief that homosexuality is a disease that should be cured, and just as harmful to autistic people.

Disability: There are two main definitions to this word: 1- Not being able to do something that the majority of people are able to do. For example: hear (deaf), see (blind), smell (anosmic), walk (para/quadriplegic), etc.  2-Being impaired by a physical/mental difference in a way that restricts one’s professional, social, personal, or leisure activities. Depending on the definition and personal opinions, autistic people can be considered disabled or not disabled.

Dyspraxia: Difficulty with gross and/or fine motor skills, very common in autistic people. To a casual observer they may appear clumsy, often dropping things, walking into things, or tripping over their own feet (gross motor skills), or with poor handwriting, poor ability to hold a writing instrument, etc. (fine motor skills).

Echolalia: Use of verbal repetition to communicate, usually used by those who are not fully verbal. Words and phrases can be immediately repeated directly (“You OK?” “You OK.”), or with some changes (“Are you OK?” “I am okay.”). They can also come from memory (“Who gave you that?” [Darth Vader voice] “I am your father.” = my father).

Executive Dysfunction: Difficulty with executive functioning; skills used to make decisions and carry out tasks. Many autistic people have problems with this. They may be unable to make what appear to be simple decisions or figure out how to accomplish a simple goal. They may know exactly what they need to do but be unable to get their body to move to do it. It has been described via metaphors in a few ways: one is having all the ingredients to make a cake but no recipe, and being expected to make the cake, but having no idea how to do it. Another is that the body is like a horse and the brain is the rider, and the rider tries to get the horse to move, but it simply won’t budge.

Functioning Labels: Outdated and inaccurate (but sadly, still commonly used) labels for autistic people based on a narrow set of criteria. Those who don’t communicate verbally are normally considered “low-functioning”, for example, and those who can are “high-functioning”. See our masterpost for more information on why these labels are damaging and should not be used.

Hyperacusis: When a person is extremely sensitive to sound and the world sounds far louder to them than to others. It is often extremely painful, like having the volume on the world turned up way too high, and can be disabling. Many people with hyperacusis have or develop tinnitus (a constant sound, often ringing, usually caused by nerve damage in the ears).

Hyperempathy: Having far more affective empathy than a normal person. This can result in things like crying often, being unable to comfort upset people because their emotions are too overwhelming, etc. Some people feel hyperempathy all the time. Some have it only sometimes or for some people, or for inanimate objects.

Hypersensitivity: A blanket term which means “being more sensitive than most people to something”. When it comes to autism, it can refer to several things. Most of the time, it is used about sensory hypersensitivity, such as sensitivity to sounds or bright lights. There is also emotional hypersensitivity (easily getting hurt feelings/responding very strongly to positive feelings).

Hyposensitivity: The opposite of hypersensitivity, some autistic people feel a lack of sensory stimulation. They feel understimulated and may constantly feel the need to seek sensory stimulation. It’s important to note than an autistic person may be hypersensitive in some ways and hyposensitive in others, or at different times.

Infodumping: Sharing a large amount of information on a single topic all at once, often without pausing or allowing others to speak, due to overwhelming enthusiasm for the subject. It is usually done on subjects of special interest.

Low empathy: Some autistic people feel reduced or no affective empathy for other people (do not identify with their emotions or feel inspired to a certain emotion when they see others having that emotion). This does not necessarily mean that they do not care about the emotions of others - some may not care, some may care a great deal - only that they do not feel what others feel. Some people with low empathy for other people have hyperempathy for inanimate objects or fictional characters.

Meltdown: When the brain is too overloaded with sensory information or stress and can no longer function properly, an autistic individual may have a very violent reaction, called a meltdown. The person melting down is generally in a lot of pain. They might scream, throw things, yell curse words and insults, cry, hurt themselves or other, and try to hide themselves in absurd locations like under couch cushions or behind doors.
This neurological event cannot be controlled or stopped once it begins. It can be made worse by interfering and adding more sensory input (by touching or talking to the person) and usually will not subside until the person is left alone to calm down. 

Neurodivergent/Neuroatypical: Having a neurology which is different from the most common ones, such as being autistic or having ADHD. Some people include mental illnesses in this label, some do not.

Neurodiversity: The philosophy that in order to succeed, survive, and thrive, the human race needs many different types of neurology, and that neurodiverse people are an important and positive component of our species.

Neurotypical: A term which is defined as “having the most common type of neurology” (ie not autistic, without ADHD/dyslexia/tourette’s, etc.). Someone with a mental illness may or may not be considered neurotypical depending on people’s opinions.

Nonverbal: Someone who cannot or does not communicate verbally (using spoken language, often including sign language). Some autistic people are always nonverbal. Most are nonverbal under stress or overload. Some are always verbal.

Passing: Successfully behaving enough like an allistic person, particularly in social situations, that no one suspects you are autistic. Often important or even necessary for some people, especially when it comes to work situations.

PECS: One of the AAC methods which is most commonly used with autistic children (and sometimes adults). Stands for “Picture Exchange Communication System”. A pictogram-based system.

Proprioception: All of the sensory input which comes from inside your body. Includes your brain’s awareness of where the different parts of your body are. Autistic people often have very poor proprioception. As a result, they may have some type of dyspraxia, odd facial expressions, odd posture and walking gait, etc., all of which they may not be aware of until someone tells/shows them.

Sensory Processing Disorder: The clinical term for someone who has difficulty processing sensory information. Includes sensory hypersensitivity, hyposensitivity and differences. Too many details to process can lead to sensory overload, shutdowns, and meltdowns. Some autistic people don’t agree that it is a disorder, and prefer to talk of “sensory processing differences”.

Sensory Overload: When too much sensory information is being sent to the brain and the brain can no longer keep up. It becomes painful and the person can become incapable of accepting new sensory information until the brain has time to catch up (like a computer freezing when too many programs are open). This often leads to shutdowns and/or meltdowns.

Shutdown: A defense mechanism against sensory overload and stress. The brain attempts to shut out all sensory input by disconnecting from the environment. The person might no longer understand speech (or even fully hear it), be able to think in language (or to think in any way at all), move their body, or communicate in any way. Their eyes might unfocus and they may seem to be completely “out of it”. This state is usually a sign that the person needs to be left alone for their brain to calm down, but if pushed by those around them, they may switch to having a meltdown.

Special Interest: A subject which an autistic person is extremely interested in and will go to great lengths to learn everything possible about.

Spoons: A metaphor used to indicate the (limited) amount of energy a disabled or sick person has to devote to various tasks. There is a whole script blog devoted to this (@scriptspoonies). Many autistic people rely on this metaphor to describe their (lack of) energy.

Stimming: Repeated actions which are used to stimulate one’s own nervous system, done for various reasons including to soothe oneself/calm down, express emotions, communicate, or just because it feels nice. Common examples include rocking back and forth, flapping hands, clenching jaw, tapping a part of the body, making a repeated noise, etc.

Verbal: Able to communicate using spoken language.

Guide to TV Tropes, Part 1: Tropes are Not Bad

Pylon @constablewrites here! You may know me as the one who likes sending people to TV Tropes. The site is a fantastic resource and can really help writers develop their understanding of story–but it can also be intimidating and frankly dangerous. So I’m here to share some wisdom not just about the site, but about the idea of tropes in the first place.

What is a trope?

Let’s start by defining terms here. For our purposes, a trope is a specific storytelling element that is recognizable in multiple works. The concept of having characters, of stories having acts like plays, of multiple plotlines, all those basic, fundamental concepts are technically tropes.

This is a very broad definition, but that’s on purpose. It’s difficult to discuss something that doesn’t have a name, so that’s what tropes are: a way to give names to those concepts and elements we recognize so we can talk about them, and so that we can be clear that we’re talking about the same thing.

But people talk about tropes like they’re a bad thing.

When someone uses “trope” in a pejorative way, they’re usually talking about a trope that is deployed uncritically, without new context. Tropes can very easily become cliches when they get regurgitated wholesale, but that does not make a trope inherently bad, and that doesn’t mean that new life can’t be breathed into tired tropes.

So why is it important to know tropes?

Essentially, it’s hard to break the rules effectively if you don’t know what they are. Media doesn’t exist in a vacuum; your story is in conversation with everything that came before and everything that will come after. You know that guy who tries to hide that he came to class late, until he smugly makes a point that was already thoroughly discussed 20 minutes ago? Don’t be that guy. (Want to know how many people are out there hawking Hunger Games clones who genuinely have no idea that franchise exists? It’s a much higher number than you just thought of, I promise you.)

What about originality? If it’s been done before it’s not original!

Think of tropes like Lego bricks. It’s not about what bits you have, it’s about how you put them together. That’s how you can take most of the same pieces from this:

…and end up with this:

Take a bunch of spy tropes that have been overused to the point of parody and give them to superheroes, and you have something that feels fresh. A stock character that’s usually male might look very different as a female, even if they otherwise fulfill the same role. Throwing film noir and detective tropes into a setting with magic and monsters invented a whole new genre. And so on. You don’t have to reinvent or twist every element to have something new; you can get just as much mileage out of turning a single trope on its head and thoroughly exploring the implications of that.

Ultimately, you can’t mess with audience expectations if you don’t know what they are. That one death in Avengers: Age of Ultron completely shocked me because the movie is screaming at the top of its lungs that it’s gonna kill a different character. (Worth noting is that I saw it with a friend who didn’t pick up on those cues at all, and thus had a completely different reaction. Knowing those expectations can cut both ways.) Tropes represent the shared language of storytelling that your readers have learned, consciously and subconsciously, and are bringing to the table. You need to understand that language if you want to speak to them effectively.

Hopefully now you understand why it might be beneficial to spend some time on TV Tropes. But don’t dive in just yet! Otherwise you’ll emerge blinking into the light a week later, muttering about egregious sliding scales and realizing that no one’s been feeding your cat and you probably don’t have a job anymore. Tune in next time where we’ll discuss how to use the site effectively and avoid the black hole.


Edit by Werew: Here is the next part of this post! Happy Troping!

@ liberals that non-ironically use the term “Alt-left” for anyone to their Left: the term “alt-right” wasn’t a pejorative coined out of thin air to make fun of right Wingers, it is a specific rebranding of white nationalism coined by white nationalists (specifically Richard Spencer who founded the Alt-right blog) that existed for some time before it came to prominence in 2016. You can’t just coin a term out of nowhere to say “both sides are baaaad” and have it hold any kind of power or significance.

But then again, y'all believe in horseshoe theory, so I’m kind of talking to wall here, aren’t I?

Lacking social skills vs using social skills to hurt people

When someone is a jerk, they’re often pejoratively referred to as “lacking social skills”.

But being a jerk and having bad social skills are different problems. Learning stronger social skills won’t necessarily make someone a better person.

Jerks often have exceptionally strong social skills. Jerks use their social skills to hurt people effectively (and to get away with it.) Sometimes this involves performing stereotypes of social awkwardness — and being very careful to pick targets they can get away with hurting. If someone is hurting people on purpose because they want to, teaching them social skills won’t usually help. They have to change their values and decide to stop hurting people.

People who are jerks and want to stop being jerks may also need to learn new skills for interacting with people. But if someone is intentionally mean, lacking skills isn’t the primary problem.

At the same time, sometimes when people are hurting others, the problem *is* weak social skills. Some social mistakes can be really harmful. (Eg: Standing too close, not understanding privacy, not understanding the difference between different types of physical contact, not understanding which kinds of questions are considered sexual, saying slurs without realizing they’re slurs, etc.) When people are hurting others by accident, learning social skills can be really helpful.

Being a jerk is a different problem than having weak social skills, and it’s important to take the difference seriously. When someone is making social mistakes out of ignorance, the solution is often education and support. When someone is a jerk and wants to learn to be better, the solution often involves education and support. (A caveat here — the people who they’re hurting should *not* be expected to be the ones providing this support.)

When someone is hurting others on purpose because they want to, often the only solution is to deprive them of opportunities to hurt others. (Eg: by banning them from events or suspending their professional license or voting them out of office.). Teaching an intentionally cruel person social skills will not help, and can actually make the problem worse.

Tl;dr It’s obnoxious to use “bad social skills” as a way to insult jerks. Being a jerk is a different problem from having weak social skills. People with good intentions and weak social skills need nonjudgemental help. (From the community or a service provider; generally not from the people they’re inadvertently hurting.) When someone is intentionally mean, teaching them social skills isn’t likely to help — and being nonjudgemental is likely to make matters worse.

remember when karkat threw a total shitfit in front of everyone on the meteor and dave laughed hysterically and reminded rose of how he’d told her about how great karkat is, see, rose, I told you about this guy, see?? Obviously it’s meant pejoratively like – pft look at this asshole who has never learned even a single strider rule of cool – but there is no way there wasn’t an underlying fascination with the sudden presence of someone so expressive and I like to think that even that early on, in that moment, dave was genuinely experiencing a little thread of excitement at the thought of spending time with someone who wore his heart so transparently on his sleeve

he goes into it in this mocking way because at that point it’s the only way he can really express that kind of emotion while maintaining his superior frame but I always read that shit has half genuine delight that he had no fucking clue how to process at the time

I imagine so many of their early interactions just being karkat pontificating endlessly about his many grievances, limbs flailing, volume irregular, pacing around with the boundless energy of the perpetually enraged, and dave just kind of laughing and telling himself silently he’s so much better than this guy while shrugging off this increasing and perplexing sense of deep discomfort, not with karkat and his performative fury but with the way he finds watching it so fascinating? why does the relative peace and quiet of being alone in his block at night keep him awake choking on his own completely fucking ridiculous existential anxiety while sitting on a metal floor listening to karkat “sandpaper for your auditory cortex” vantas screech about bullshit for hours is so fucking mesmerizing?

anonymous asked:

we really need term like CIS? i feel like they Works more as pejorative than help in Identify groups. We dont need to creat more fights, we should bring people together not Divide them and make them fight against each other.

Yes, we need the term cis! 

Look, I’m sorry if being labeled “cis” upsets you, but being labeled cis isn’t even remotely as difficult as it is to be a trans person in American society. For starters, North Carolina isn’t trying to tell cis people where they’re allowed to go the bathroom.

We need labels like “cis” “white” and “straight” in order to talk about the systemic power that cis, white, and straight people have. When you insist upon not saying “cis”, you are shutting down those conversations. It may make you a bit uncomfortable, but please just deal with it. 

(hoo boy I am opening the floodgates today, huh) 

Just like Queer, you can choose to label yourself how you like, but DO NOT label others as the slur- Homosexual. 

According to the American Psychological Association, Homosexual is an pejorative term that should not be used in reference to others. As you do not know if they have reclaimed it or not. 

As do all of these organizations and major media outlets:

  • The Associated Press
  • The New York Times
  • GLAAD
  • The New Oxford Dictionary
  • Safe Schools Coalitions

-It perpetuates negative stereotypes due to its historical associations with pathology as a mental disorder linked to criminal behavior.

-It is ambiguous/unclear, as it is often assumed to refer exclusively to men and thus renders lesbians invisible.

-It reduces LGB loving relationships to clinical, medical, and scientific ones.

-It is the preferred term of homophobes. 

In the early 1990′s “Homosexual” fell out of use due to its negative associations, and people in the LGBT community request that others use the person’s actual label and not this term with its long and cruel history.

I feel like one thing the “queer is a slur” crowd overlooks...

…is that the word gay has been used so overwhelmingly as a pejorative, as a slur, that most children in the U.S. in the past several decades likely grew up learning “gay” as a word for bad, strange, or wrong before they fully understand that there are “gay” people, and that it’s not just a word with negative connotations.

Kids grow up hearing “That’s so gay!” said with such vehemence relating to topics that those same kids aren’t remotely educated about, and they just internalize that it’s bad. This is how you get elementary schoolers saying, “Mr. Hopkins gave us homework, he’s so gay,” and the same elementary schoolers grow up to be high schoolers and adults who say, “What? I don’t mean gay like gay people, I mean gay like stupid or bad.”

And some of them aren’t overt homophobes in any other way… but dang, you teach little kids that a word that describes a class of people means “bad” and “wrong” before they know those people exist, and that’s bound to shape the way they think about things, isn’t it?

And in contrast you get queer kids who start to put 2+2 together about what “gay” really means a little bit faster than the kids around them because they’re desperate for some information, some hints of meaning… but they’re also hearing the same lessons as everybody else, that gay=bad, gay=wrong, gay=undesirable, gay=something no one ones and no one should be, gay is the worst thing you can be.

In the small town I lived in and the school I went to, nobody ever hit me and called me queer. No one ever shouted “queer” from a moving car while I was walking home. No one ever threatened or inflicted violence on me with the word “queer” on their lips.

Gay, though? Yes. And variations on the f-slur, but gay itself was enough of an invective, enough of a pejorative, to the people flinging it.

“Gay” was the slur that cishet people threw at me as a form of violence, often in corollary with physical violence. “Queer” is a word that I learned online, from members of my community. My experience of the former word is as an attack, while the other was as a sanctuary and respite from that attack.

Now, I’m not a gay man, but a bisexual trans woman. I was still sorting that out at the time, but I doubt it would have made a difference to many of my tormenters if I’d been able to explain it properly.

So when “gay” is used as the happy-go-lucky umbrella for what I would personally call the queer community, gay with even its positive connotations strongly coded as male, I’m not just being misgendered/swept under a default label of male along with a lot of other women and non-binary folks, I’m being forced to accept a label that I never sought, one that is definitely used as a pejorative and a slur, and a slur that was specifically used as a weapon against me.

Both “gay” and “queer” have the same problematic histories and problematic presents. They have both been subject to reclamation efforts. To me, the difference is how those efforts are organized. 

“Gay” is an attempt to normalize, to assimilate, to take the elements of our community that are most palatable to the heteronormative homogeneous hegemony and emphasize them, making those elements even more palatable and altering or hiding the other elements of the community. 

“Gay” is like trying to get into an exclusive school that you fear is likely to reject you for prejudiced reasons, so you keep your nose clean, make sure you take all the right extracurriculars, polish your cover letter and personal essay, and try to make the right contacts with influential people on the inside… and if you have to hide some of your past activities, break ties with friends who are less presentable, and de-emphasize your family to make sure the admissions office doesn’t get the wrong idea about what you’d bring to their institution, well, it’ll be worth it, because that’s what you have to do get a, you know, fair shake.

“Queer” rejects that. Queer rejects homogeny, it does not demand that we sand down our rough edges or smooth out our contours. It does not seek to reshape ourselves or our community to fit ever-evolving standards designed to keep us out, but it challenges those standards.

If “gay” is trying to appeal to a bigoted admissions board by being smooth and shiny enough to slip in, “queer” is challenging the admissions board to accept or reject you on your own merits as you exist, and challenging the bigoted assumptions that underline the power structure as revealed by this. It’s bypassing the admissions board by creating your own infrastructure for sharing resources and information. 

I have a suspicion that a certain percentage of the intra-community backlash against the word “queer” is not because the negative connotations of the word hurt us as listeners, but rather that the radical connotations of the word hurt the effort to make the community acceptable to a presumed default “general audience”, to assimilate gayness into heteronormativity. 

I.e., it is less, “Queer makes people think it’s okay to bash us.” and more “Queer makes people think we’re not like them.”

Most people end posts in defense of the label “queer” and the umbrella term “queer community” by saying “I won’t call queer if they’re not comfortable with it,” and most of them get told, “BUT THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE DOING WHEN YOU SAY ‘QUEER COMMUNITY!”

I’ve never yet seen anybody talking about the gay community have to disclaim that they’re not using the word to people who view it as unreclaimed slur or who just plain find it too hurtful to have even given that discourse any thought.

I won’t call someone queer if they don’t think of themselves a queer. I will use queer as an umbrella term. If that’s not you, you can cheerfully include yourself out of it. 

And heck, I’m doing you a solid. If you didn’t have a queer community to point to, you wouldn’t have anyone you could point to when you want to clarify that you’re not like those people.

So the gang obviously have tons many shitty inside jokes and in group memes that no one else understands

- Anyone asks about a city or a place the reply is always “that’s Canada right?”

- Ram and the shadowkin’s secret love affair

- “*Quill rides in with a bus* heard you were talking shit”

- [Blank] is a pejorative phrase

- If the rest are ignoring her she just shout “you’d listen to me if I were some a-hole telling you how fat you looked on instagram”

- *Sees a flower petal * “EVERYONE RUN, THEY’RE AFTER THE SQUIRRELS”

- Asking Matteusz for random details about Charlie’s anatomy “so his elbows are totally normal right?”

- Explaining human things to Charlie very slowly like he’s a child (even if he has heard of them before) “so Charlie this is what us humans call a C-U-P, they hold LIQUIDS”

- Pointing at random bugs “That’s a weird looking alien”

- The ongoing debate about whether or not it’s okay to snog a robot

- *Charlie and Matteusz are holding hands* *Ram covers Tanya’s eyes* “Not in front of the child”

anonymous asked:

is it true that some people call catalonian people poles/polish? why?

Yes, it is!

Many Spanish people pejoratively call Catalan people (especially those from Catalonia) “polacos” (“Poles”) and the Catalan language “polaco” (“Polish”) because we are often seen as weird and speaking a weird language, since we have a different language and culture than Castile/Spain.

Most people think that calling us “polacos” was invented in the 20th century, since the term gained a lot of popularity among the fascist military and Spanish nationalists during the fascist dictatorship of Franco (1939-1975). But, in fact, the term originates from the 18th or 19th century. There are different theories that experts believe are the origin of this:

  1. Because of the similarity between both nations, Catalans and Poles are much alike. Back then, Poland was also an invaded nation trying to get its independence. The Poles’ feelings of inconformist patriotism could be compared to what was also going on in Catalonia, where Catalanist politicians were trying to get some rights for the Catalan people, but met with rejection from the Spanish government.
    In the 20th century, the paralelism between both nations increased. Catalonia was invaded by the fascist Spanish troops at the beginning of 1939 as part of the Spanish Civil War. In September of the same year, Poland was invaded by the Nazis. Some people think that this also played a role in making the term more popular.
  2. Another hypothesis says that this term is a direct consequence of the fact that battalions of Polish mercenaries helped the Austrias side during the Spanish War of Succession (1701-1715, a war in which Castile gave support the Bourbon monarchy and Catalonia-Aragon gave support to the Austrias, and resulted in the victory of Castile and its invading the Catalan Countries and banning our language and culture, starting a process of forced “Spanishization”). Then Castilians took the term “polacos” to refer to those who were on the Austrias’ side, most importantly Catalans, kinda being their equivalent of our word botifler. It later became more popular because Catalan was considered difficult to understand, and so comparable to Polish.
  3. Other historians say that in the 18th century Madrid, the public in theatres were divided in two sides, and one side was called “polacos”. The “polacos” side was very loud, and for this reason the term “polacos” was spread to the Catalan politicians who went to Madrid to ask the Spanish government for some rights for the Catalan people and language.
  4. Lastly, some historians point to a dictionary of slang political insults from Madrid in the 19th century. In this dictionary, the term “polaco” means those politicians who went to the Courts to ask for particular cause, or that of their region. In Spanish politics, Catalans were the most insistent politicians in this sense, and in international politics it was the Poles, since Poland was trying to gain recognition. According to the historian José Luis Gómez Urdáñez, both Catalans and Poles were “always showing their miseries of stateless nation.”

It is possible that some of these reasons are linked, and more than one is true.

I’d also like to add that here in Catalonia we have a very famous political satyre TV show called Polònia (“Poland”), as a parody of this!