peetness

i was thinking about how minions have become encorporated into most anything, sort of like frozen, and then i realized
what if it ends up like frozen and the games-for-girls thing; with Pregnant Elsa Cooking and Anna Olaf Dentist Surgery
i really want to see strange off-brand minion flash games. please.

6

A new series of prints by artist Roger Peet aims to address a tricky topic: cultural appropriation. In his series In//Appropriate, which debuted at Portland State University’s Littman Gallery this month, Peet printed images of white Americans engaging in cultural appropriation on tall banners. Frozen in time, Miley Cyrus joyfully twerks with her tongue in its signature position, a hipster wears a keffiyeh, and Katy Perry smiles in her American Music Awards geisha costume. Behind them, another vision of whiteness—a violent one—is printed in red: Miley is starkly framed against a scene of police in Ferguson, a bohemian white girl in a feathered headdress is juxtaposed with an iconic photo of a mountain of buffalo skulls.

To accompany the images, Peet constructed special glasses made from cardboard and red plastic. These are “whiteness goggles,” a sign explains. When you put them on and look at the images, suddenly the red, violent image disappears. Viewers are left with just the visions of Miley, Katy Perry, and Elvis with none of the violence behind them. The viewers are forced to consider the blinders that race creates: One of the privileges of being white is the ability to ignore racism. All too often, the reality of the white supremacy is rendered invisible to people who don’t want to see it.

“When you put on the Whiteness Goggles, the colonial, military and police violence that underpins casual cultural consumption disappears,” explains Peet, in his artist statement of the project. Peet himself is a white immigrant to the US from Britain—he works as a politically minded printmaker with the Justseeds Collective. In addition to well-known celebrities engaged in cultural appropriation, the In//Appropriate show includes an image of Peet, foregrounded holding an American flag against a backdrop of the wars in Vietnam and Afghanistan. Including himself in the show was important, Peet says, to make clear that as a white person coming from England, he benefited in ways from racist societal and economic structures. He faced few hurdles in immigrating to the United States. “I was welcomed with open arms,” he says—a contrast to the racial stereotyping many people of color face when they immigrate the US.

Read more about the show—and listen to voicemails from people calling in to discuss cultural appropriation—on Peet’s Tumblr.

I fumble. I’m not as smooth with words as Peeta. And while I was talking, the idea of actually losing Peeta hit me again and I realized how much I don’t want him to die. And it’s not about the sponsors. And it’s not about what will happen back home. And it’s not just that I don’t want to be alone. It’s him. I do not want to lose the boy with the bread.
—  Katniss Everdeen
Yet More Reasons Why Jerry Peet Is An Awful Human Being.

In his video on “Do Princesses Dream Of Magic Sheep?” he rants about Luna showing signs of depression/self hatred. He even made a huge deal about Luna creating the Tantabus to punish herself,

It is worth mentioning that Jerry once said that he has no sympathy for people who practice self harm because he thinks they are stupid for doing something that hurts themselves. Even though most people who are going through depression and self hatred do it for a variety of reasons such as venting out their frustrations and hatred for themselves or they think they personally deserve the pain. People who are going through extreme emotions don’t always decide what they are going to do based on logic they are going to base it on emotion.

This really pisses me off as someone who has committed self harm before. Sometimes It almost feels like Peet is a robot with no understanding of emotions or how humans act.


Well he’s pretty much well established as a sociopath on top of being a massive hypocrite, so I can’t say I’m too surprised.

2

Slip On These “Whiteness Goggles” and the Violence of Cultural Appropriation Disappears

A new series of prints by artist Roger Peet aims to address a tricky topic: cultural appropriation. In his series In//Appropriate, which debuted at the Portland State University Littman Gallery this month, Peet printed images of white people engaging in cultural appropriation on tall banners. Frozen in time, Miley Cyrus joyfully twerks with her tongue in its signature position, a hipster wears a keffiyeh, and Katy Perry smiles in her American Music Awards geisha costume. Behind them, another vision of whiteness—a violent one—is printed in red: Miley stands out against a scene of police in Ferguson, a bohemian white girl in a feathered headdress is juxtaposed with an iconic photo of a mountain of buffalo skulls, and a still from Iggy Azalea’s “Bounce” video frames a portrait of colonizing Queen Victoria.   

Via Bitch Magazine.

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Here are some photos from IN//APPROPRIATE, a show of visual and audio media on display during July of 2015 at the Littman Gallery at PSU in Portland. The show incorporates digital collages and wearable “Whiteness Goggles” that make the colonial/military/police violence that underpin white supremacy disappear. It also includes a reappropriation of the gallery space by indigenous artists Sara Siestreem and Camas Logue, who are using it for drying basketry materials for fall workshops. Voicemails from Portland residents expressing their opinions on the subject play on two media players. The show is up until the 29th! The show website is http://inappropriateculture.tumblr.com/, where you can see all of the banner images and listen to all of the voicemails.