pedagogy

Professors give warnings of all sorts that, when not explicitly entangled in the national politics of political correctness, amount less to coddling than to minimizing chances of disengagement with material. “Block off more time this weekend than you usually do, since the reading for Monday is a particularly long one,” for instance, is a reasonable way of reducing the number of students who show up unprepared by issuing a warning. “Today we’re discussing a poem about rape, so be prepared for some graphic discussion, and come to office hours if you have things to say about the poem that you’re not comfortable expressing in class,” meanwhile, is a similarly reasonable way of relieving the immediate pressure to perform in class, which stresses out so many students…  If you take away the media hysteria surrounding trigger warnings, you’re left with a mode of conversational priming that we all use: “You might want to sit down for this”; “I’m not sure how to say this, but…” It’s hardly anti-intellectual or emotionally damaging to anticipate that other people may react to traumatic material with negative emotions, particularly if they suffer from PTSD; it’s human to engage others with empathy. It’s also human to have emotional responses to life and literature, responses that may come before, but in no way preclude, a dispassionate analysis of a text or situation.
— 

The Trigger Warning Myth, Aaron R. Hanlon.

it frankly baffles me that I’ve almost never seen people recognizing that “hey, here’s a preview of what we’re going to discuss next week” (’trigger warning’ buzzword optional) is good pedagogy, and so many of these professors who are very Defensive about being emotionally harmful to their students have a disproportionate sense of self-importance (and a really bad idea of what education is about). the material teachers use is not a surprise to be inflicted upon their students; classrooms are not places for them to “blow their students’ minds.” 

I am more and more convinced that true revolutionaries must perceive the revolution, because of its creative and liberating nature, as an act of love. For me, the revolution, which is not possible without a theory of revolution — and therefore of science — is not irreconcilable with love. On the contrary: the revolution is made by people to achieve their humanization. What, indeed, is the deeper motive which moves individuals to become revolutionaries, but the dehumanization of people? The distortion imposed on the word “love” by the capitalist world cannot prevent the revolution from being essentially loving in character, nor can it prevent the revolutionaries from affirming their love of life. Guevara (while admitting the “risk of seeming ridiculous”) was not afraid to affirm it. “Let me say, with the risk of appearing ridiculous, that the true revolutionary is guided by strong feelings of love. It is impossible to think of an authentic revolutionary without this quality.”

A Great Big 10 Minute Drawing Lesson

Good prepwork makes good art. Taking 20 seconds to do a value sketch before you do an actual sketch or drawing can tell you which shapes are going to be hard for you, demonstrate if there are problem areas with your reference, help you decide how to change things, and help you figure out how you’re going to place the final object on the page.

1. Break your reference image (from life or photo) into three values. Dark, midtone, light. No more! Only 3!* Squint to see them.

2. Put the darks down. Not sure if it’s dark or not? Round everything to the closest value. ONLY 3, PEOPLE.

3. Add the midtones.

4. Leave the lights (or introduce them if you’re working on colored paper).

5. Remember that your background choices shape your foreground and are as important a decision as the subject.

6. Draw what you see, not what you know is there. (i.e. artists often find noses difficult, because they draw a nose. Draw the three values, and a nose will appear)

7. Be Rembrandt.

A value study can be done with a Sharpie on a receipt or the back of your hand. 20 seconds. It’s only  your worksheet, so it doesn’t matter how ugly or wrong it is — no one’s gonna see it unless you post it on your tumblr with numbers photoshopped over it.

20 seconds. I swear I’m giving you the keys to the universe here. Don’t crash it.

20 second value study –> 30 second line study —> 20 minute drawing****

 

 

* If it doesn’t make sense in three values, it’s not the greatest composition/ reference. FIND A NEW REFERENCE**

**grossly oversimplified***

***we only have 10 minutes here

****the more involved my final work is going to be, the more prep work I’m going to do. It’ll save me time in the long run and keep me from doing stupid things in the final

GO FORTH AND FILL TUMBLR WITH ART FAREWELL FAREWELL

5 Ways To Set Students Up For Success On A New Piece

1. PLAY THE RECORDING as students are walking into the classroom and while they are unpacking. And play the same piece every day or the same part of the piece that you need students to focus on.

2. REHEARSE THE SCALE, position, or finger pattern BEFORE looking at the repertoire. I have my students learn the scales required for the pieces I chose and then give them the music.

3. CLAP AND COUNT rhythm flash cards to isolate key rhythms that are in the piece BEFORE giving students the repertoire.

4. Find a MEASURE or section where all parts are playing in UNISON RHYTHM to build confidence in the students’ for sight-reading skills. I usually isolate one - four measures at a time and first perform it for them while they shadow bow to hear it played correctly before they play it.

5. INCLUDE A QR CODE that links to the recording of the piece on their repertoire copy.

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How to Get the Most from Think-Pair-Share

What Is Think-Pair-Share?

It’s an instructional strategy where the teacher stops lecturing and asks students to consider a question (think), turn to a partner (pair), and discuss their response with the partner (share).

What’s So Great about Think-Pair-Share?

1. It breaks content into bite-sized pieces.
2. It gets students active.
3. It provides novelty.
4. It allows for formative assessment.
5. It requires almost no prep.

Getting the Most from Think-Pair-Share

1. Explain why you’re doing it.
2. Set up pairs ahead of time.
3. Select a “Person A” and a “Person B”
4. Ask a specific question.
5. Listen.
6. Debrief 

Source: Gonzalez, 2015 / www.cultofpedagogy.com

vimeo

Strangely close to our hearts. Be interested to watch this when it comes out.