pearl the intern

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February 19th 1942: Japanese internment begins

On this day in 1942, US President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed executive order 9066 which allowed the military to relocate Japanese-Americans to internment camps. A climate of paranoia descended on the US following the attack on the naval base at Pearl Harbor by the Empire of Japan, which prompted the US to join the Second World War. Americans of Japanese ancestry became targets for persecution, as there were fears that they would collude with Japan and pose a national security threat. This came to a head with FDR’s executive order, which led to 120,000 Japanese-Americans being rounded up and held in camps. The constitutionality of the controversial measure was upheld by the Supreme Court in Korematsu v. United States (1944). Interned Americans suffered great material and personal hardship, with most people losing their property and some losing their lives to illness or the violence of camp sentries. The victims of internment and their families eventually received an official government apology in 1988 and reparations began in the 1990s. This dark episode of American history is often forgotten in the narrative of US involvement in the Second World War, but Japanese internment poses a stark reminder of the dangers of paranoia and scapegoating.

That was in 1942. Earlier that year, on February 19, 75 years ago this Sunday, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued an executive order, No. 9066, which set the internment into motion. On its face, the order was “neutral,” authorizing the military to designate whole swaths of land as military zones, and evacuate any persons from it as they saw fit.

But behind that facade lay a much darker purpose: to tear 120,000 innocent Japanese-Americans from their homes along the West Coast and relocate them to 10 prison camps scattered throughout the United States.

It didn’t matter, back then, that most of us were US citizens and had never even been to Japan. We were presumed guilty, and held without charge for four years, simply because we happened to look like the people who had bombed Pearl Harbor. For that crime, we lost our homes, our livelihoods and our freedoms.

Every year, on February 19, we Japanese-Americans honor this day as Remembrance Day, and we renew our pledge to make sure what happened to us never happens again in America. I am always amazed, and saddened, that despite our decades long efforts, so many young people today are not even aware that such a tragedy and miscarriage of justice took place here.

[…]

We are an interdependent people, sharing a common bond of humanity. The most pernicious aspect of Trump’s policies is thus the denial of those basic bonds and that humanity. I will not stand for it, and no people of good conscience should.

The internment is not a ‘precedent,’ it is a stark and painful lesson. We will only learn from the past if we know, understand and remember it. For if we fail, we most assuredly are doomed to repeat it.

When the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga (then Aiko Yoshinaga) was a senior at Los Angeles High School.

She remembers the day the following spring that her principal took the Japanese students aside and said, “You’re not getting your diplomas because your people bombed Pearl Harbor.”

Japanese-American families on the West Coast were rounded up and sent to internment camps. Yoshinaga was worried that she would be separated from her boyfriend, so to the horror of her parents, Yoshinaga and her boyfriend eloped.

The Yoshinaga family was sent to the Santa Anita, Calif., detention center, and later to Jerome, Ark. Meanwhile, Yoshinaga and her new in-laws were sent to Manzanar, near Death Valley. Yoshinaga remembers their first day as hot and dusty, even though it was only April. The barracks where the family lived were crowded and sparsely decorated.

At 92, A Japanese-American Reflects On The Lessons Of Internment Camps

Photo: Lauren Migaki/NPR
Caption: Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga was a high school senior when she entered the Manzanar internment camp. Now 92, she points to the place in Manzanar, near Death Valley in California, where she lived.

YOI x Sol International Pearl Acrylic Collection


Original Release Date:
March 2017

Featured Characters (4 Total):
Viktor, Makkachin, Yuuri, Yuri

Highlights:
Yuri actually has a different hairstyle than the anime (Down instead of up) for his free skate version.

The Viktor + Makkachin + Yuuri + Katsudon at the bottom is an Animate exclusive!

“Dressed in his uniform marking service in the first World War, this veteran enters the Santa Anita assembly center for persons of Japanese ancestry evacuated from the west coast.” This is the original caption to this photo, taken in Arcadia, California, on April 5, 1942.

The attack on Pearl Harbor launched a rash of fear about national security, especially on the West Coast. In February 1942, just two months after Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt as commander-in-chief, issued Executive Order 9066, which had the effect of relocating all persons of Japanese ancestry, both citizens and aliens, inland, outside of the Pacific military zone.

Roosevelt’s order affected 117,000 people of Japanese descent, two-thirds of whom were native-born citizens of the United States. Within weeks, all persons of Japanese ancestry–whether citizens or enemy aliens, young or old, rich or poor–were ordered to assembly centers near their homes. Soon they were sent to permanent relocation centers outside the restricted military zones. (Read more here: http://bit.ly/2ghV2PB)

On Saturday, November 19, the Japanese American National Museum is hosting our next National Conversation. This time the topic is “Immigration: Barriers and Access.” You can register to attend in person or watch the livestream: http://bit.ly/2eDdEVj

girls like dollies chapter 9 (trixya) - lale

I say it every time I update, but I truly honestly cannot explain what it means to me to see the reaction from everyone to this fic. We’re almost at the end now, so I hope you all enjoy this update! As always, all the love and thanks in the world to Matilda and fleursverts, who are actual angels from heaven and are so much of the reason why this fic continues to get written!! i love you ladies!

Keep reading

8

International Women’s Day Playlist Part 2

1. Chumped- Something About Lemons

2. Screaming females- Ripe

3. VersaEmerge- Fixed At Zero

4. Hop Along- Sister Cities

5. Be Your Own Pet- Becky

6. The Runaways- Cherry Bomb

7. The Distillers- Drain The Blood

8. Fight Like Apes- Tie Me Up With Jackets

9. September Girls- Black Oil

10. The Eyeliners- I Could Never Hate You

11. Milk Teeth- Grease

12. Next Stop Atlanta- I’m Not Morrissey

13. No Doubt- Spiderwebs

14. The Coathangers- Hurricane

15. Anavae- Anti-Faith

16. Joan Jett and the Blackhearts- Bad Reputation


Or listen on spotify here!

When you realize the depth in Steven Universe

Garnett is an interracial couple

Pearl was a slave

The gems are fighting for freedom

Peridot is/was a prisoner of war

Peridot is a racist

Amethyst is a child growing up in this conflict

Rose was a pioneer and a martyr

The diamonds are supremists. Authoritarian.

Steven is a child of exile.

girls like dollies chapter 5 (trixya) - lale

Here’s the next chapter of girls like dollies! Poor Trixie’s struggling with her feelings a lot this chapter – bear in mind the warning for internalised homophobia – and it was kind of cathartic to write this after spending all of my teenage years convincing myself that I had ‘girl crushes’ instead of crushes! I hope you all enjoy!

Keep reading

A Gathering of Navies….

The short video above serves as an introduction to the world’s largest international maritime exercise….RIMPAC (Rim of the Pacific) 2016….now gathering from the vast reaches of the Pacific Ocean, and other parts of the world.

Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 30th to August 4th….primarily operating in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California naval operating areas.

Ships moored at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam display ceremonial maritime signal pennants and flags from their masts as the international fleet gathers.

RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world’s oceans.

Every available berth is single, double and triple-occupied at the Pearl Harbor Naval Base over the Independence Day holiday inport phase of RIMPAC 2016.

RIMPAC 2016 is the 25th exercise in the series that began in 1971. RIMPACs are held every even-numbered year.

     Who wouldn’t enjoy a break in Hawaii! (When you get off duty!)

                                           *          *          *          *

I participated in several RIMPACs during my Navy career. Each one was challenging, exciting, unique and a professional joy.

And, when we all gathered in port….what an amazing opportunity to meet your counterparts from a vast array of other nations!

                                            *          *          *          *

                                RIMPAC 2016 participating nations

                                                 Australia
                                                 Brunei
                                                 Canada
                                                 Chile
                                                 China
                                                 Colombia
                                                 Denmark
                                                 France
                                                 Germany
                                                 India
                                                 Indonesia
                                                 Italy
                                                 Japan
                                                 Malaysia
                                                 Mexico
                                                 Netherlands
                                                 New Zealand
                                                 Norway
                                                 Peru
                                                 Philippines
                                                 Singapore
                                                 South Korea
                                                 Thailand
                                                 Tonga
                                                 United Kingdom
                                                 United States

The traditional end-of-RIMPAC group photo….this one from RIMPAC 2012

                                      _________________________

>>Top photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeff Troutman, USN