peace protests

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The March on the Pentagon, 10/21/1967

Wolfe, Frank, White House photographerSeries: Johnson White House Photographs, 11/22/1963 - 1/20/1969Collection: White House Photo Office Collection, 11/22/1963 - 1/20/1969

On October 21, 1967, an estimated crowd of 70,000-100,000 demonstrators gathered by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington to protest the Vietnam War and march on the Pentagon in the first major national protest against the war.  In addition to the signs, chants, and other hallmarks of an anti-war demonstration, activists distributed daisies, and additionally planned to levitate the Pentagon off its foundation in an act of political theater.  By the end of the protest, the Pentagon remained in place and over 600 protesters had been jailed, and dozens hospitalized.  


Opening November 10 at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War

This exhibition presents both iconic and recently discovered National Archives records related to 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War. They trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.

”Members of the military police keep back protesters during their sit-in at the Mall Entrance to the Pentagon.”  10/21/1967

Series: Color Photographs of Signal Corps Activity, 1944 - 1981Record Group 111: Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, 1860 - 1985

On October 21, 1967, an estimated crowd of 70,000-100,000 demonstrators gathered by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington to protest the Vietnam War and march on the Pentagon in the first major national protest against the war.  In addition to the signs, chants, and other hallmarks of an anti-war demonstration, activists distributed daisies, and additionally planned to levitate the Pentagon off its foundation in an act of political theater.  By the end of the protest, the Pentagon remained in place and over 600 protesters had been jailed, and dozens hospitalized.  


Opening November 10 at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War

This exhibition presents both iconic and recently discovered National Archives records related to 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War. They trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.

Whether or not a protest is “peaceful” is decided by the state, not the protestors.

There’s a reason the Women’s March wasn’t considered a riot, and it has everything to do with white privilege and nothing to do with how “well behaved” we were. Police show up to peaceful BLM protests already in riot gear all the time.


“The abuser’s problem is not that he responds inappropriately to conflict. His abusiveness is operating prior to the conflict: it usually creates the conflict, and it determines the shape the conflict takes.”

― Lundy Bancroft, Why Does He Do That?: Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men

A female demonstrator offers a flower to military police on guard at the Pentagon during an anti-Vietnam demonstration.”  10/21/1967

S.Sgt. Albert R. Simpson, photographer. Series: Color Photographs of Signal Corps Activity, 1944 - 1981Record Group 111: Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, 1860 - 1985

On October 21-22, 1967, an estimated crowd of 70,000-100,000 demonstrators gathered by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington to protest the Vietnam War and march on the Pentagon in the first major national protest against the war.  In addition to the signs, chants, and other hallmarks of an anti-war demonstration, activists distributed daisies, and additionally planned to levitate the Pentagon off its foundation in an act of political theater.  By the end of the protest, the Pentagon remained in place and over 600 protesters had been jailed, and dozens hospitalized.  


Opening November 10 at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War 

This exhibition presents both iconic and recently discovered National Archives records related to 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War. They trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.

2

If Trump is so patriotic, why did Melania (an immigrant) have to nudge him to place his hand over his heart during the Nation Anthem. In one case, he didn’t do it at all. So who’s the real S.O.B.?

#FirstAmendment #PeacefulProtest  #TakeAKnee #SocialJustice #RacistTrump

Video is better than ‘tapes’ #unpresidential

theatlantic.com
Mike Pence's Flagrant Waste of Taxpayer Money
The vice president spent more than most Americans make in a year traveling to an NFL game to perform a political stunt.
By Conor Friedersdorf

On Sunday, Vice President Mike Pence made a big show of leaving an NFL game early. He declared himself upset that some players knelt during the singing of the Star Spangled Banner. “I will not dignify any event that disrespects our soldiers, our flag, or our national anthem,“ he declared, as if attacking those things was the intent of the athletes.

The NFL players knelt in protest because they believe that African Americans are being denied their self-evident rights to life and liberty by a prejudiced criminal-justice system.

“This is not about the military, this is not about the flag, this is not about the anthem,” 49ers Safety Eric Reid later told reporters. “My mother served in the armed forces. Three of my uncles served … I have the utmost respect for the military, for the anthem, for the flag … This is about systemic oppression that has been rampant in this country … I will keep doing what I feel is necessary, to use the platform that I have, to make changes. It’s really disheartening when everything you were raised on, everything I was raised on, was to be the best person I can be, to help people who need help, and the vice president of the United States is trying to confuse the message that we’re trying to put out there. I don’t know what to say about it.”

Pence is not compelled to agree with how players protest. But by fleeing the entire NFL game, he adopted the tactics of a childish, petulant snowflake who reacts to speech he dislikes by misrepresenting it, expressing umbrage, and retreating to a “safe space.”

The major difference?

When an immature teenager makes a show of fleeing from expression that he regards as politically incorrect, he’s typically evading ideas he ought to confront on his own dime. Whereas Pence spent taxpayer money to get to that NFL game. Lots of it.

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03/October/2017. Catalonia today.

If you follow this blog or have been paying attention to the news, you will know that the Spanish military police tried to stop the Catalan independence referendum by using violence against the voters, including throwing elder people down the stairs and jumping over them, shooting rubber bullets (which are illegal in Catalonia btw) at voters and even at nurses trying to help wounded people reach an ambulance, getting clothes off girls and throwing them to the floor naked while laughing, graing women by their hair and dragging them out f the voting center while kicking them, etc. Over 800 Catalan people were hurt for trying to vote.

Today, to protest police brutality carried out and defended by the Spanish government, there has been an “aturada de país” which means we stopped the country. Practically all businesses have closed, and about 60 highways have been cut (including the border with France) by citizens playing chess or cards in the middle of the road. The economy is stopped and thousands of people are protesting on the streets. Many people also used the day to go bring flowers to the schools that were violently assaulted by the Spanish police.