pcv

10

Bolshevik Revolution Celebrated by Venezuela

IN PICTURES: Venezuelans brandishing placards featuring Russian revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin took to the streets commemorating the centenary of the Bolshevik revolution.

A crowd dressed in red and brandishing images of Bolshevik leader Vladimir Lenin, often juxtaposed with the former leader of Venezuela’s Bolivarian Revolution, Hugo Chavez, celebrated in the streets of Caracas to mark 100 years since the founding of the first socialist state.

“We, as revolutionaries and socialists, join in this global commemoration,” said Freddy Bernal, a member of the National Directorate of the United Socialist Party of Venezuela, who called for the mobilization.

Workers marched from Caracas’ Autonomous National Telephone Company to the Miraflores Presidential Palace.

The celebration was one among several taking place in various places around Latin America, recognizing the profound impact the Russian revolution had in the region, spurring anti-imperialist, progressive, and socialist movements throughout.

Via teleSUR English

Welcome to The Prime Corporate Video Store

Welcome to The Prime Corporate Video Store!

Currently operating out of an abandoned mall in the town where you used to live, we here at The P C V Store post the finest Vaporwave / Future Funk / Chillwave / Synthwave / Dreampop / Shoegaze and other ear candy tracks for your listening pleasure, as well as any music that I happen to make.

Please, do enjoy your visit.

~ Nimbus

6

First Look: The Ferrari 812 Superfast

Ferrari has selected the 87th edition of the Geneva International Motor Show for the world premiere of the new 12-cylinder berlinetta, the 812 Superfast, the most powerful and fastest Ferrari in the marque’s history.

This new car not only introduces a plethora of innovative features but is also particularly significant as the V12 series marked the official start of the glorious Prancing Horse story in 1947, 70 years ago this year.

The 812 Superfast thus ushers in a new era in Ferrari 12-cylinder history, in doing so building on the invaluable legacies of the F12berlinetta and F12tdf. It is aimed at clients demanding the most powerful and exclusive Ferrari in the range: an uncompromising sports car that will deliver exhilarating driving both on road and track yet also be comfortable enough to allow its owners to enjoy it as an all-round experience.

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Don’t join the Peace Corps

You heard me. Don’t do it. I’m telling you, it’s going to break your heart.

The Core Expectations for Volunteers states you are expected to “serve where the Peace Corps asks you to go, under conditions of hardship, if necessary…” What it doesn’t state however is just what hardship means.

Right now you’re thinking, “Oh. There’ll be no flush toilets or showers. I can handle that. I might have to squash a few spiders, but for the high calling of changing the world, I think I can put up with those things.”

But the truth is, hardship isn’t the quirky and fun hardship you’re expecting, where each new day brings adventure upon crazy adventure, more wonderful than the next. True hardship is much more sobering.

During your service you might have to bury a neighbor. Or watch helplessly as your host family is torn to pieces by corruption. You might show up to school to learn one of your students was killed by a classmate. Your host sister could be kidnapped and forced to marry a man she’s never met. You might witness abuse, violence and mistreatment. You may see your best student lose to a kid from another school because his bribe was the biggest. Your dog might be fed a needle, just to quiet it down, forever.

And if none of that happens, then something else will. There’s just no knowing how hard it will be or it what way. It could be dealing with other volunteers is your biggest challenge. Or that you can never live up to the expectations of your host organization. Or that the Internet is so accessible you spend your entire day trolling Facebook, jealous of all the lives continuing on back home.

And what about all the things you’ll give up? Your boyfriend might not wait two years for you. You’ll put your career on hold. Your familiar support networks probably won’t be around – there’ll be no gym, no fast food joint, no car to drive, no family to visit. The stress and diet could make you lose thirty pounds—or gain thirty—whichever you don’t want.

The Peace Corps uses phrases like, “Life is calling. How far will you go?” and in a breath you’re ready to sign your name on the line. But two years is a long, long time and in the middle you find the world you wanted to change is a confusing and complex puzzle of which you are just one, tiny piece.

So please, if you’re not ready for the heartbreak in the hardship, don’t join the Peace Corps.

Or do.

Because you might just find that all your blood, sweat and tears are worth it – worth the pain, worth the time and worth the investment in the people for whom your heart breaks. Because you might learn some of the most important lessons of your life – that a broken heart can heal stronger than it was before, that a softened heart has more compassion for the world, and that in between its cracks and fissures is the only place where true beauty and grace can grow.

My mom sent a package and three weeks later I finally got it in my grubby little hands. After lots of miscommunication, I thought it was lost, until a student, Florida, helped me and got it where it needed to go.

The inside was amazing, she fit so much inside a flat rate package! She has some magic powers when it comes to shoving things inside of a suitcase or box–hence the reason I usually ask for her help when packing. But wow! She even sent some kids books which will be perfect for the classes I’ll teach at the Primary School next month, and I’m so stoked to have cinnamon and Italian herbs to cook with. AND CHEESE! Velveeta! I have no idea what I’m going to do with it yet, but it will definitely taste better than the expired cheese from the supermarket that smells like the inside of my dog’s ears.

Thanks mom! 💙 Time to test out some Italian herbs!

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First Sip
New Coke Classic - Prime Corporate Video's First Sip Edit ▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀ ▀▄▀▄▀▄ [take the first sip] ▄▀▄▀▄▀ ▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀

BEHOLD

My first Vaporwave song

You can take your 'Natural' Flea Remedies...

… And shove them somewhere dark and anatomical.

You sit comfortably behind your computer screen, far from suffering, possibly never even seeing a flea, either because you never looked or because they were never there in the first place, and proudly tell people that vets are just in it for the money, so you should treat fleas with olive oil / garlic / diatomaceous earth / apple cider vinegar / wishful thinking instead.

You’re not here in the real world trying to comfort an old, desperate woman who took your advice and is paying the price. Her old cat is being put to sleep because of massive flea burden causing an iron deficiency anaemia, with a PCV of 11% (lost 70% of her blood cells to these parasites). She might have afforded a dose of real flea treatment that works, instead of wasting in on your ‘cheap alternatives’,  but she certainly can’t afford the blood transfusion, oxygen therapy and intensive care her cat requires.

You’re not here as I put her cat to sleep, resting on her tear soaked chest, coat greasy with olive oil, stinking of garlic and lavender.

 You don’t see the consequences of these unchecked parasites, which you probably only ever thought of as a dirty annoyance.

 But I am here.

I am here comforting this woman while bad internet advice killed her cat with a completely preventable condition.

So to those promoting ‘natural’ parasite control, whether it’s because you like to feel clever, or always wanted to be a vet but didn’t get to be one, I’d just like you to know one more thing.

Death by parasite is completely 'natural’ too.

5

Kaili, Guizhou, China - China has about 55 ethnic minority groups and Han is the majority. The Miao ethnic minority group is one I have been able to learn a little about mostly because their is a large population in Guizhou province. I have visited several Miao villages and have many Miao students. Miao people also speak their own language which sounds pretty cool. My favorite part is their beautiful clothing and jewelry.

2

The first weekend I arrived in a rural village in Madagascar to begin my Peace Corps service – I picked out a stubborn but irresistible piglet to be my pal. 

Now over a year later, the only thing that has changed is size…both my piglet and my love for her, continue to grow. Buffy will never get too big for my lap!

Or at least…we’ll make it work.

10

Urbanismo Porteño, Chile

Why Peace Corps is not Voluntourism

According to Webster, Voluntourism is a form of tourism in which travelers participate in voluntary work, typically for a charity. Over this past week I’ve shared some contrasting views on Voluntourism, which is increasingly prevalent and controversial in our globalized world. 

Having served in Morocco as a volunteer full-time for two years, my views on volunteerism have certainly morphed from what they were in high school, college, and even grad school. It may seem ironic that coming out of this international service experience I am more convinced than ever that local community service is where the real change happens. When people are involved and invested in the community of which they are a part, they can help create an environment that reflects their values. Lasting change happens when folks are invested for the long-term. It stands to reason that people have more cause to care about the long-term outcomes of their actions for the community in which they live and plan to raise their children than in some random spot on the globe. 

But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a place for volunteering in a community that isn’t your own. Whether it be in a state that’s been hit by natural disaster or advancing water-security internationally, sometimes an issue needs more hands, resources, and minds tackling it than what might be available in the affected area. But how do you bridge the sincerity and personal investment people have for their own communities to a foreign community and, possibly, culture? This is where an organization like Peace Corps comes in. 

One of the biggest critiques of voluntourism is the lack of understanding volunteers have of those they’re “helping.” This ignorance can lead to mistaken actions that are neither helpful nor sustainable. And the short-term nature of Voluntourism doesn’t leave room for the volunteers to see the real effects of their actions. The structure of Peace Corps is thoughtfully designed to avoid the pitfalls that seem to be haunting this growing industry. Here are 6 ways that Peace Corps not Voluntourism. 

1. We Live with Host Families

The first step to understanding a culture is, not just seeing how they live, but living how they live. By staying with host families we’re able to observe and participate in the little things that might never be captured in a “cultural session.” Understanding the lifestyle of our host country nationals is paramount to shaping the action-steps we take throughout our service. It helps us see what the real needs are, the cultural constraints, and how decisions are made. Living how those around us live plumits us into the community in a way staying a hotel or dorm never could. We eat what they eat, sleep where they sleep, and wear what they wear. We are a part of the family.    

2. We Learn the Language

Learning someone’s language is an indisputable way to show that you really care. It isn’t easy; it means constantly exposing yourself to failure; it shows long-term investment. Sometimes, PCVs learn languages that no one has ever paid any attention to before. And it isn’t just about being able to express ourselves, it’s about being able to understand those we’re with, hearing their thoughts, singing their songs, crying to their soap operas, laughing to their jokes. Though we never stop being students of the language, our effort says “we’re not just passing through.” 

3. There is No Agenda

The other day I was sitting at the women’s center with the new volunteer in my site. One woman was teaching the PCV a stitch that is used for the traditional Moroccan clothes. As we sat there sewing and chatting with the women, I had an overwhelming sense that this is where the magic happens. While I admit it is frustrating at first, Peace Corps does not give us much direction on what to do in our communities. I realize more and more each day just how appropriate it is that they don’t. True development is ecological not top-down. Peace Corps doesn’t barge into communities with a plan (even if all the American volunteers are begging for one), instead the volunteers watch and wait and listen and learn and then find ways to fit service in. Shwya b Shwya, or Little by little, is our motto here.  

4. We Listen

When speaking to the 100+ new volunteers that recently arrived to Morocco, I told them You may be asked to teach English or something you don’t want to do, but you have to remember this isn’t about what you want, it’s about what they want. Listen to your community and meet them where they are. Start with English-it’s your foot in the door- and as you get to know your community you will learn how to introduce other things. But always remember, what you want doesn’t matter. When we don’t listen failure is bound to happen. In fact, failure is bound to happen regardless, but listening to our communities is a huge part of having a service that is effective and allows our failures to be transformed into learning opportunities.    

5. We Capacity Build

They say that in development our goal is to put ourselves out of a job. And Peace Corps volunteers often work towards just that. We are encouraged to find community partners for every activity or class, teaching them how to teach and lead if needed. A project done without a host country national is not considered sustainable and sometimes even frowned upon. Our primary role is to promote volunteerism of people in our communities. If our presence somehow inspires those around us to invest in their town and believe that positive change can happen, then that is a job well done.  

6. We Stay for Two Years

Development takes much longer than two years, but it’s long enough to lay a foundation and get things started. Two years is long enough to learn the names of the kids on your street, long enough to celebrate the annual holidays with your host family, long enough to watch favored characters on the soap operas get murdered and come back to life, long enough to watch your baby host sister learn how to speak and master words you still can’t pronounce right, long enough to watch your friends get engaged, married, pregnant, and become mothers. My village in Morocco is my home and the people I serve are my family, neighbors, friends.  


It is undeniable that some folks sign up for Peace Corps to have a neat, easy, satifying experience, but Peace Corps is none of those things; development is none of those things. Those people either realize and embrace the struggle of true development work and call forth the patience to see their commitment to the host country through, or they quit after a few months in country. Either way, they are forced to come to terms with the fact that Peace Corps is so much more than Voluntourism. A sincere volunteer always remembers this is not about me, realizes the value in an unAmerican level of patience, and learns that being uncomfortable doesn’t mean you can’t be happy.

So ask yourself this when considering volunteering outside of your community: What are my intentions? And have I done my research on this organization? 

Veterinary Acronyms

Acronyms are an easy and effective way (most of the time) for doctors to take quick and efficient notes, write prescriptions, and fill in histories. Here is a list of some of the more commonly and frequently used veterinary acronyms:

  • WNL: Within Normal limits
  • NSF: No significant findings
  • ADR: Ain’t doing right
  • NDR: Not doing right
  • SID: Once daily- every 24 hours
  • BID: Twice daily- every 12 hours
  • TID: Three times daily- every 8 hours
  • QID: Four times daily-  every 6 hours
  • PRN: As needed
  • QOD: Every other day
  • D/C: discontinue
  • q: every (q2hrs= every two hours)
  • prn: as needed
  • gt: drop
  • qs: quantity sufficient
  • AD: Right ear
  • AS: Left ear
  • AU: Both ears
  • OD: Right eye
  • OS: Left eye
  • OU: Both eyes
  • IM: Intramuscular
  • SQ: Subcutaneous
  • IV: Intravenous
  • IO: Intraosseous
  • IN: Intranasal
  • IP: Intraperitoneal
  • PO: By mouth
  • NPO: Nothing by mouth
  • PE: Physical exam
  • SOAP: subjective, objective, assessment, plan
  • BAR: Bright, alert and responsive
  • QAR: Quite, alert, and responsive
  • BCS: Body condition score
  • TPR: Temperature, pulse, respiration
  • HR: Heart rate
  • RR: Respiration rate
  • BP: Blood pressure
  • PLR: Pupillary light reflex
  • IOP: Intraocular pressure
  • CRT: Capillary refill time
  • MM: Mucous membranes
  • GS: Gut sounds
  • BM: Bowel movement
  • ICP: Intracranial pressure
  • CPP: Cerebral perfusion pressure
  • F/S: Spayed female
  • M/N: Neutered male
  • Hx: History
  • Tx: Treatment
  • Dx: Diagnosis
  • Rx: Prescription
  • Sx: Surgery
  • CBC: Complete blood count
  • HCT: Hematocrit
  • PCV: Packed cell volume
  • TP/TS: Total protein/ Total solids
  • CRI: Constant rate infusion
  • UA: Urinalysis
  • USG: Urine specific gravity
  • UTI: Urinary tract infection
  • URI: Upper respiratory infection
  • STT: Schirmer tear test
  • DIC: Disseminated intravascular coagulation, aka dead in cage
  • PU/PD: Polyuria/Polydipsia
  • CHF: Congestive heart failure/ Chronic heart failure
  • HBC: Hit by car