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Mizuki Fukumura - 3rd Solo PB - Kagayaki [Making of DVD]

Ghost Cases 2016/02/06 05:25:07

Ghost Cases



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In the summer of 1955, it seemed as if all of Hollywood had descended on the dusty West Texas town of Marfa as production began on the highly anticipated movie Giant. Now, 60 years later, “Children of Giant” returns to Marfa to explore the dramatic story behind the making of the film and its enduring legacy.
Starring: Henry Cisneros, Joe Cabezuela
Original air date: April 17, 2015


5.0 out of 5 stars
This fascinating documentary will appeal to both classic movie fans and those interested Mexican-American cultural history
This is a documentary - not multi-season. Not sure why listed that way. It is coming out on DVD from PBS Home Video but I don’t see that listed on Amazon. I did write a review of the DVD so I’ll post it here. I hope it is helpful.This wonderful84-minute documentary was produced for PBS’s Latin arm and probably only received limited exposure on TV. It is a unique presentation because it delves into film history – the making of the Academy Award Willing film “Giant” – filmed 60 years ago in the small West Texas town of Marfa – directed by George Stevens and starring Rock Hudson, Elizabeth Taylor, Dennis Hopper and James Dean (in his last film role) – but also covers the lives of Mexican-Americans who inhabited the town.Director Hector Galan found some amazing archival footage for the era and one of the catering staff (a German war bride!) had many snapshots to share. The film is nicely balanced with sections devoted to short bios of Edna Ferber (the author of the book on which the film was based) and Director Stevens (his son, George Jr. – also a director – is interviewed). Two of the original cast – Earl Holiman and Mexican actress Elsa Cardenas – have extended comments. Many of the residents who were children at the time of the filming (and got acting roles) tell of their memories.“Giant” was about class division and feminism (a feminist author discusses this aspect) and how Mexican-Amer8icans were treated. The town of Marfa also had class division and the one thing that will probably shock you (well, it did me) is the fact that in 2015 (60 years after the film was made) the cemetery in Marfa is still segregated with Mexican-American graves still separated from the rest of the graves by – get this – a string of barbed wire ☞Go to Amazon
5.0 out of 5 stars
An excellent documentary with more than you expect
This is a terrific documentary that focuses on how the production and people involved with creating George Stevens’ classic Giant affected the people, and especially the children of Marfa, Texas, the town where a great deal of the film was created. With a strong focus on the race issues between Mexicans and Americans it becomes as much of a cultural history lesson as a documentary review. I’m looking forward to watching it again some time soon. ☞Go to Amazon
5.0 out of 5 stars
Love the Movie, Love this story
I really liked this. Behind the scenes information is fascinating to me. Giant is one of my all time favorite movies, what a fabulous cast and production! After watching this program, the next time I watch Giant it will be with fresh eyes and a broader mind. It may be like seeing it for the first time. ☞Go to Amazon
4.0 out of 5 stars
A Different Giant
I am not a huge fan of Giant. I’ve seen it twice and feel like it loses some steam after Elizabeth Taylor’s big interrupting the men scene. This was interesting (for me at least) that the focus wasn’t on the conflicts of the big four, but on the community when the Hollywood circus ces to town. ☞Go to Amazon
2.0 out of 5 stars
Not as titled
I feel mislead by the title of this film; it does include interviews with children who were involved with the movie Giant, but it’s more an overview of the time period and the movie Giant as a whole. It’s not a bad retrospective, but it’s not great either. ☞Go to Amazon
Sundance Docu ‘Norman Lear: Just Another Version Of You’ Nabbed By Netflix & Music Box

Fresh off the Sundance opening night premiere that saw its subject feted by Robert Redford followed by a standing ovation for the film itself, Music Box Films has picked up theatrical rights to the documentary Norman Lear: Just Another Version Of You. The PBS & new imprint American Masters Pictures film will be released in theaters in June, followed in Fall, 2016 by broadcast on PBS. PBS retains DVD and digital distribution rights, with exclusive streaming rights going to Netflix.

The film examines the long and legendary career of television pioneer Norman Lear, the producer and activist behind a long run of hugely influential shows during the 1970s and 80s, among them All in the Family, Sanford and Son, The Jeffersons, Good Times, and Maude, Lear also founded Act III Communications, which produced several notable films including Stand By Me, The Princess Bride, and Fried Green Tomatoes. Directed by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady, Featuring appearances and interviews with Lear, George Clooney, Bill Moyers, John Amos, Alan Horn, Russell Simmons, Amy Poehler, Jon Stewart, and others, the film is notable for striking visuals, mingling Lear’s past and present and breaking the fourth wall.

Directed by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady, it was produced by Suzanne Hillinger and Brent Miller, and executive produced by Michael Kantor. Alex Takats and Cara Mones served as associate producers. The deal was negotiated by David Koh, Josh Braun, Dan Braun & Ben Braun on behalf of Michael Kantor, WNET VP Stephen Segaller, and PBS Distribution head Andrea Downing. Ed Arentz, Managing Director and William Schopf, President, Music Box Films, also negotiated.

Related stories‘Equity’ Producer-Stars Alysia Reiner & Sarah Megan Thomas On Their Femme-Driven Wall Street Film - Sundance StudioElisabeth Moss & Director Jason Lew On Living In 'The Free World’ - Sundance StudioViggo Mortensen & Director Matt Ross On 'Captain Fantastic’ As A Different Kind Of Dad - Sundance Studio

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The FBI Files - Season 4 2016/02/02 23:25:32

The FBI Files - Season 4



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In the summer of 1955, it seemed as if all of Hollywood had descended on the dusty West Texas town of Marfa as production began on the highly anticipated movie Giant. Now, 60 years later, “Children of Giant” returns to Marfa to explore the dramatic story behind the making of the film and its enduring legacy.
Starring: Elsa Cárdenas, Robert Hinkle
Original air date: April 17, 2015


5.0 out of 5 stars
This fascinating documentary will appeal to both classic movie fans and those interested Mexican-American cultural history
This is a documentary - not multi-season. Not sure why listed that way. It is coming out on DVD from PBS Home Video but I don’t see that listed on Amazon. I did write a review of the DVD so I’ll post it here. I hope it is helpful.This wonderful84-minute documentary was produced for PBS’s Latin arm and probably only received limited exposure on TV. It is a unique presentation because it delves into film history – the making of the Academy Award Willing film “Giant” – filmed 60 years ago in the small West Texas town of Marfa – directed by George Stevens and starring Rock Hudson, Elizabeth Taylor, Dennis Hopper and James Dean (in his last film role) – but also covers the lives of Mexican-Americans who inhabited the town.Director Hector Galan found some amazing archival footage for the era and one of the catering staff (a German war bride!) had many snapshots to share. The film is nicely balanced with sections devoted to short bios of Edna Ferber (the author of the book on which the film was based) and Director Stevens (his son, George Jr. – also a director – is interviewed). Two of the original cast – Earl Holiman and Mexican actress Elsa Cardenas – have extended comments. Many of the residents who were children at the time of the filming (and got acting roles) tell of their memories.“Giant” was about class division and feminism (a feminist author discusses this aspect) and how Mexican-Amer8icans were treated. The town of Marfa also had class division and the one thing that will probably shock you (well, it did me) is the fact that in 2015 (60 years after the film was made) the cemetery in Marfa is still segregated with Mexican-American graves still separated from the rest of the graves by – get this – a string of barbed wire ☞Go to Amazon
5.0 out of 5 stars
An excellent documentary with more than you expect
This is a terrific documentary that focuses on how the production and people involved with creating George Stevens’ classic Giant affected the people, and especially the children of Marfa, Texas, the town where a great deal of the film was created. With a strong focus on the race issues between Mexicans and Americans it becomes as much of a cultural history lesson as a documentary review. I’m looking forward to watching it again some time soon. ☞Go to Amazon
5.0 out of 5 stars
Love the Movie, Love this story
I really liked this. Behind the scenes information is fascinating to me. Giant is one of my all time favorite movies, what a fabulous cast and production! After watching this program, the next time I watch Giant it will be with fresh eyes and a broader mind. It may be like seeing it for the first time. ☞Go to Amazon
4.0 out of 5 stars
A Different Giant
I am not a huge fan of Giant. I’ve seen it twice and feel like it loses some steam after Elizabeth Taylor’s big interrupting the men scene. This was interesting (for me at least) that the focus wasn’t on the conflicts of the big four, but on the community when the Hollywood circus ces to town. ☞Go to Amazon
2.0 out of 5 stars
Not as titled
I feel mislead by the title of this film; it does include interviews with children who were involved with the movie Giant, but it’s more an overview of the time period and the movie Giant as a whole. It’s not a bad retrospective, but it’s not great either. ☞Go to Amazon
Penn & Teller: BS! Season 4 2016/02/04 23:24:55

Penn & Teller: BS! Season 4



External image

In the summer of 1955, it seemed as if all of Hollywood had descended on the dusty West Texas town of Marfa as production began on the highly anticipated movie Giant. Now, 60 years later, “Children of Giant” returns to Marfa to explore the dramatic story behind the making of the film and its enduring legacy.
Starring: Elsa Cárdenas, Robert Hinkle
Original air date: April 17, 2015


5.0 out of 5 stars
This fascinating documentary will appeal to both classic movie fans and those interested Mexican-American cultural history
This is a documentary - not multi-season. Not sure why listed that way. It is coming out on DVD from PBS Home Video but I don’t see that listed on Amazon. I did write a review of the DVD so I’ll post it here. I hope it is helpful.This wonderful84-minute documentary was produced for PBS’s Latin arm and probably only received limited exposure on TV. It is a unique presentation because it delves into film history – the making of the Academy Award Willing film “Giant” – filmed 60 years ago in the small West Texas town of Marfa – directed by George Stevens and starring Rock Hudson, Elizabeth Taylor, Dennis Hopper and James Dean (in his last film role) – but also covers the lives of Mexican-Americans who inhabited the town.Director Hector Galan found some amazing archival footage for the era and one of the catering staff (a German war bride!) had many snapshots to share. The film is nicely balanced with sections devoted to short bios of Edna Ferber (the author of the book on which the film was based) and Director Stevens (his son, George Jr. – also a director – is interviewed). Two of the original cast – Earl Holiman and Mexican actress Elsa Cardenas – have extended comments. Many of the residents who were children at the time of the filming (and got acting roles) tell of their memories.“Giant” was about class division and feminism (a feminist author discusses this aspect) and how Mexican-Amer8icans were treated. The town of Marfa also had class division and the one thing that will probably shock you (well, it did me) is the fact that in 2015 (60 years after the film was made) the cemetery in Marfa is still segregated with Mexican-American graves still separated from the rest of the graves by – get this – a string of barbed wire ☞Go to Amazon
5.0 out of 5 stars
An excellent documentary with more than you expect
This is a terrific documentary that focuses on how the production and people involved with creating George Stevens’ classic Giant affected the people, and especially the children of Marfa, Texas, the town where a great deal of the film was created. With a strong focus on the race issues between Mexicans and Americans it becomes as much of a cultural history lesson as a documentary review. I’m looking forward to watching it again some time soon. ☞Go to Amazon
5.0 out of 5 stars
Love the Movie, Love this story
I really liked this. Behind the scenes information is fascinating to me. Giant is one of my all time favorite movies, what a fabulous cast and production! After watching this program, the next time I watch Giant it will be with fresh eyes and a broader mind. It may be like seeing it for the first time. ☞Go to Amazon
4.0 out of 5 stars
A Different Giant
I am not a huge fan of Giant. I’ve seen it twice and feel like it loses some steam after Elizabeth Taylor’s big interrupting the men scene. This was interesting (for me at least) that the focus wasn’t on the conflicts of the big four, but on the community when the Hollywood circus ces to town. ☞Go to Amazon
2.0 out of 5 stars
Not as titled
I feel mislead by the title of this film; it does include interviews with children who were involved with the movie Giant, but it’s more an overview of the time period and the movie Giant as a whole. It’s not a bad retrospective, but it’s not great either. ☞Go to Amazon