paul schofield

10

I’m finally up to date with submissions! I’ve read work from almost 50 writers and I’ve accepted pieces from 10 of them.

So far LEFT is set include work from Kimmy Walters, Paul Cunningham, Samuel Carey, Penny Goring, Zarah Butcher-McGunnigle, Bob Schofield, Sarah Jean Alexander, Janey Smith, Michael O'Hara, & Dalton Day, as well as a few other people I’m working out the details with.

But I want more.

I’m going to send out  more solicitations and some reminders to people who already said they were going to submit. I also want work from everyone else. If you haven’t sent me anything yet, do it now. Please send me your beautiful things.

I’ve accepted a lot of poetry so far. I want more stories and visual art.

Also, I’m finally setting a deadline for submissions: the 1st of July.

Fill my inbox.
Drown me.
Show me what is possible.

2003 : DIONYSOS

Toby starred as Pentheus, King of Thebes, in this BBC Radio drama by Andrew Rissik alongside Paul Schofield, Diana Rigg and Chiwetel Ejiofor (above with Toby).  

An uncompromising play, mixing ancient Greek myth with stark violence, examining the clash between an authoritarian young king and the leader of a charismatic religion who threatens to destabilise the state.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 3 on 20 April 2003.

A Letter to Actors... from Paul Schofield

“I found that an actor’s work has life and interest only in its execution. It seems to wither away in discussion and becomes emptily theoretical and insubstantial.
"It has no rules, except perhaps audibility.
"With every play and every playwright, the actor starts from scratch, as if he or she knows nothing, and proceeds to learn afresh every time, growing with the relationships of the characters and the insights of the writer. When the play’s finished its run, the actor is empty until the next time, and it’s the emptiness which is, I find, apparent in any discussion of theatre work.”–Paul Scofield’s letter to actors/Photo of Scofield in “Expresso Bongo,” from 1958/
“I found that an actor’s work has life and interest only in its execution. It seems to wither away in discussion and becomes emptily theoretical and insubstantial.

"It has no rules, except perhaps audibility.

"With every play and every playwright, the actor starts from scratch, as if he or she knows nothing, and proceeds to learn afresh every time, growing with the relationships of the characters and the insights of the writer. When the play’s finished its run, the actor is empty until the next time, and it’s the emptiness which is, I find, apparent in any discussion of theatre work.”–Paul Scofield’s letter to actors/Photo of Scofield in “Expresso Bongo,” from 1958/