pastured egg

Breakfast from this morning! 2 pasture raised eggs fried in @fourthandheart ghee, steamed broccolini, avocado 🥑, and a piece of toasted @foodforlifebaking flax Ezekiel bread 👍

Instagram - goodhealthgoodvibes

My food lifestyle

If you notice I did not use the word “diet”. We need to be less focused on getting “skinny” and focus more on eating food the way nature intended. I do pay attention to what and how I eat as well as maintain a workout regimen because my main job does require me to get naked on camera. I really am passionate about my lifestyle so I do believe I would be doing exactly the same thing even if I was in another profession.

I cannot stress how bad “low fat” “diet” or “light” foods are, my first suggestion is to look at the label. Most of the foods that are marked towards weight loss have so many chemicals added, more sugar (synthetic or real), and preservatives. I don’t know about you but I like to know what I am putting in my body, the fewer the ingredients the better.

Fats are not your enemy. I eat bacon, I eat butter, and I eat meat. People have a misconception that fat leads to gaining weight, this is simply not true. A healthy lifestyle is all about moderation, as are most things. I’m going to drop some knowledge on you; Cholesterol is not actually fat, its a Low Density Lipo-protein (LDL), it is not to blame for poor heart health or weight gain. Where it can get troublesome is when you mix LDL’s and carbohydrates, this causes the LDL’s to mutate in shape thus creating issues in our bodies. Sugar and excess carbs are where you need to be weary.

1:1 ratio. Did you know that if you eat a ratio of good fat (omega 3) and “bad” fat (omega 6) of 1:1 it essentially cancels out any of the negative effects of saturated fat so long as your carb intake is in check?

Why grass-fed and pasture raised? Well for starters, there is a significantly lower amount of omega 6, and much more omega 3 fatty acids in anything that is fed a grass fed diet and pasture raised compared to the grain-fed caged counterparts. Omegas are lovely heart healthy fats that also are great for fat loss especially in the belly area. CLA; grass-fed butter and meats as well as pasture raised eggs are loaded with this wonderful fat burning amino acid. Don’t believe me? Crack open a generic egg in a bowl, and do the same with the pasture raised egg, the difference alone in color will blow your mind.

Organic. I suffer from a few autoimmune disorders so I cannot stress the importance of eating organic. It puts so much less stress on your body, your ingesting fewer pesticides, and did you know according to Stanford studies there are 20-40% more antioxidants in organic produce compared to their conventional counterpart? Antioxidants are like the fountain of youth, they help keep your mind and body young.

All that being said I do eat the occasional baked good, bread, and sour patch kid. But I do try to stick to eating WHOLE FOODS, in their most simple form most of the time. I do not count calories, or worry about eating too much bacon. I limit my sugar and carb intake as that is what can lead to excess weight gain, brain fog, and inflammation just to name a few things. I am not a Dr, but an enthusiast that reads a lot of books, if you want some book suggestions I reccomend Grain Brain, and Brain Maker by David Perlmuttler, he is an MD.

5

Not pictured - a dozen pastured eggs, and the butter (already in the pot for ghee). $134 all told.

Rice works for us - if it doesn’t work for you (you’ll note that only Jean is getting rice this week, actually) then avoid it. It’s $2.99 for the 48oz bag pictured here.

Happy & Free

We welcomed 1,000 hens from a pasture-based egg farm last week. Pictured here are a few enjoying fresh water upon their arrival to Animal Place’s Rescue Ranch adoption center. We are grateful for all of the volunteers and staff who made and continue to make it possible for us to take in so many individuals and provide them with the medical care and love they deserve.

I seriously can’t believe it’s already September!! I mean seriously, what happened?! Time is flying!!

I have enjoyed the summer, but to be honest, I’m pretty excited for fall. I love pumpkin pie anything, cider, scarves, blazers, etc. And then when NYC gears up for Christmas, it’s truly magical. 

I wanted to make a breakfast recipe that was not only low carb, but also one where I could incorporate some cinnamon or pumpkin pie flavor. I’m ready!!

I decided to make some almond flour pancakes. Seriously so freaking good! Make them, make them now! And I even had extra and they reheated so well! 

1 ¾ cup Blanched Almond Flour
2 Pastured Eggs, whisked
½ tsp Salt
1 tsp Pure Vanilla Extract ½ tsp ground Cinnamon, ¼ tsp ground Nutmeg (I used pumpkin pie spice instead)
2/3 cup Water
1 Tbsp Salted Butter, for frying

  1. In a small mixing bowl, whisk two eggs.
  2. Pour almond flour, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg into a medium sized mixing bowl.
  3. Add vanilla extract, and eggs to the bowl.
  4. Mix with a wooden spoon to combine.
  5. Add water, and continue to stir.
  6. Heat 1 tablespoon of grass fed butter or coconut oil in a large non stick skillet.
  7. Using 1/8 cup, scoop batter into the frying pan, leaving enough space in between pancakes to flip.
  8. Cook 2 minutes on the first side, flip, and cook for a remaining 1-2 minutes. Add additional cooking fat as needed. (It helps to flip pancakes back and forth a bit to ensure they are cooked through.)
  9. Top with your choice of grass fed butter or coconut oil, and a sprinkle of cinnamon, and serve.

Enjoy this one guys! It’s delish!

XOXO, Sami

swimming-to-djibouti  asked:

Actually, science supports veganism in many ways, and the reason it's not found in any traditional cultures is because people never had the option to survive this way.

In reply to your other “ The only benefit of eating meat (that I’ve found) is b12.” ask, 

It’s more than just B12 (I don’t understand how this is the only one you’ve ‘found’, seeing as this is the first thing listed when you Google is being vegan/veggie is good for you.)

  • Animal protein contains all the essential amino acids in the right ratios. It is important for muscle mass and bone health, to name a few. Vegans don’t get any animal protein, which can have negative effects on body composition (2, 3, 4, 5).
  • Creatine helps form an energy reservoir in cells. Studies show that vegetarians are deficient in creatine, which has harmful effects on muscleand brain function (6, 7, 8).
  • Carnosine is protective against various degenerative processes in the body and may protect against aging. It is found only in animal foods (9, 10, 11).
  • Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) is the most active form of Omega-3 fatty acids in the body and primarily found in animal foods. The plant form of Omega-3s, ALA, is inefficiently converted to DHA in the body (12, 13, 14).
  • Not surprisingly, vegans and vegetarians have much lower testosterone levels than meat eaters.   - Popular Science

K2. You can eat as much calcium as you want but it won’t strengthen your bones unless it is accompanied by vitamin K2.

Unlike vitamin K1, plants do not provide vitamin K2.(The one and only exception to this rule is natto, a fermented soybean product. One problem, however, is that natto is, for the majority of humans and animals, repulsive to eat). Like other fat-soluble vitamins, Vitamin K2 is found fatty sources – Mother Nature packages the vitamin with the cofactors required to absorb it. You’ll get vitamin K2 in pastured egg yolks, milk and cheese from grassfed animals, liver, beef, and chicken.” - Link

Vegetarians have a higher risk of developing nutritional deficiencies caused by lack of animal protein in their diet than meat-eaters. The more restrictive the diet, the higher potential for vitamin B-12, protein, calcium and iron deficiencies. Food from animals supplies all the essential amino acids, the building blocks for protein, while most plant proteins, with the exception of soy and the grain quinoa, do not contain all the essential amino acids. Vegetarians must consume foods that contain different amino acids over the course of the day to ensure that they get all the amino acids they need. While plants contain iron, your body absorbs the iron they supply, called nonheme iron, less efficiently than heme iron from meat. Consuming foods high in vitamin C along with plants high in iron increases iron absorption. Many vegetables contain substances that reduce calcium absorption, increasing the risk of calcium deficiency and bone loss in vegetarians who don’t consume dairy products. Beans, lentils and vegetables such as spinach contain iron.” - Healthy Eating 

Any negative effects of eating meant listed in those links can be countered by simply eating healthy, lean meats… no need for supplements and or having to cease consumption entirely. And therefor, flip side, any “benefits” of being vegan (low cholesterol. etc) can be achieved on an omnivorous diet as well. They aren’t exclusive. Unnatural additives or bad fats that harm you can be found in both diets and can be avoided or consumed with both. 

Oh by the way, you know how soy is listed as an alternative protein in most of those links? Long term, high soy consumption is terrible for you and terrible for the environment. Soy increases estrogen, which can lead to all sorts of issues. 

So you’re saying it’s not naturally sustainable? Sounds like a good argument against it on a logical level and on a health level. 

Most of the pros on this list are canceled out by the cons (#s 1-4,9-22,etc), or can be achieved just the same by eating a healthy omnivorousness diet (#7,9, etc)

I’m not seeing a good argument for it.  When I Google reasons to go vegan or for things telling you that soy isn’t bad, I’m getting sources like Peta and blogs like “celestial healing”…

Chicken Salad Sandwich on paleo bread with red leaf lettuce and avocado.

I’ve been craving this ever since I made my crock pot chicken the other day, and saved the breasts for last to make this delicious chicken salad! And I used an extra egg (from a pasture-raised chicken) to make my paleo mayo, which definitely made it creamier than usual.

I make my chicken and tuna salad different every time, depending on what I have in the house. But all the ingredients are all organic, all the time. Let’s see what I used this time:

chicken breast
homemade mayo
red onion
fresh garlic
carrots
celery
habanero
capers (rinsed free of excess salt and vinegar)
fresh parsley
black pepper
oregano

I’m in love with frittatas lately! This one I made with a fruit bowl consisting of apricots, peaches 🍑, banana 🍌, strawberries 🍓, clementines 🍊 and blueberries.

FRITTATA
3 organic pasture raised eggs (2 egg whites, 1 whole egg)
1 oz goat cheese
½ cup cherry tomatoes
½ cup sweet potato (baked)
2 tbsp green onion
Preheat oven to 400° F. Whisk egg, green onion, and cherry tomatoes together. Lightly fold in sweet potato and goat cheese. Pour mixture into lightly oiled skillet and bake for about 10 minutes or until egg isn’t runny on top.

anonymous asked:

why do i feel like as ive gotten older ive gotten dumber?

You are exposed to less novel challenges I would guess. Try doing physical things  you wouldn’t normally do, talking to people you wouldn’t talk to, and try learning things that seem way beyond your scope of understanding. You have to use your mind and body or they rot. I also recommend a stack of liquid sam-e, noopept powder, l-tyrosine, folic acid, and eating good pastured chicken eggs with the thick shells 

anonymous asked:

What is your diet like?

I’ve committed to a Ketogenic Diet for about a year now, entailing that I consume 30g or less of carbs per day; this demands my body to reconfigure itself to run primarily on ketones from fat rather than glucose from carbs.

For breakfast I blend a nutritional smoothie comprised of organic carrots, blackberries, almond butter, spinach, kale, sugarless dark chocolate, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, and 2 raw pastured eggs; I’ll have an avocado and 5 handfuls of raw nuts on the side comprised of walnuts, pecans, and macadamia nuts that I’ll dip in organic coconut oil with Himalayan salt.

For dinner I’ll prepare 2 organic, hormone and antibiotic free, grass fed beef patties, and 2 more pastured eggs; cooked in coconut/olive oil mix, dressed up with organic mayonnaise and plenty of seasoning. I also primarily drink water throughout the day, an occasional tea or kombucha being my only exceptions.

Since I’ve begun researching and experimenting with my diet over the course of the past 3 years or so, essentially purging my body of toxins whose presence I was unconsciously maintaining, it’s been akin to waking from a coma and observing the world slowly come into focus.

Until these past few years, I didn’t know it was possible to eat a meal without feeling bloated, uncomfortable, and succumbing to a mysterious lethargy, nor was I aware that many of my symptoms of depression and ADD were simply in relation to the effects that these pollutants were having on my brain chemistry.

I had also grown accustomed to getting sick at least once or twice each winter, but this June marks 3 years since I’ve even so much as caught a cold. I can only relate this to having established such a durable immune system via my refined eating habits. I feel more mentally and physically capable than I have ever felt in my entire life, which is an encouraging awareness at 25 years old.

intoxicated47  asked:

Is it possible for you to share the diet you use?

I’ve committed to a Ketogenic Diet for almost a year now, entailing that I consume 30g or less of carbs per day; this demands my body to reconfigure itself to run primarily on ketones from fat rather than glucose from carbs.

For breakfast I blend a nutritional smoothie comprised of organic carrots, blackberries, almond butter, spinach, kale, sugarless dark chocolate, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, and 2 raw pastured eggs: I’ll have an avocado and 5 handfuls of raw nuts on the side comprised of walnuts, pecans, and macadamia nuts that I’ll dip in organic coconut oil with Himalayan salt.

For dinner I’ll prepare 2 organic, hormone and antibiotic free, grass fed beef patties, and 2 more pastured eggs; cooked in coconut/olive oil mix, dressed up with organic mayonnaise and plenty of seasoning. I also drink plenty of water throughout the day, often with lemon, and will take 5000 IU’s of vitamin D throughout the winter months.

Since I’ve begun researching and experimenting with my diet over the course of the past 3 years or so, essentially purging my body of toxins whose presence I was unconsciously maintaining, it’s been akin to waking from a coma and observing the world slowly come into focus.

Until these past few years, I didn’t know it was possible to eat a meal without feeling bloated, uncomfortable, and succumbing to a mysterious lethargy, nor was I aware that many of my symptoms of depression and ADD were simply in relation to the effects that these pollutants were having on my brain chemistry. 

I had also grown accustomed to getting sick at least once or twice each winter, but this June will mark 3 years since I’ve even so much as caught a cold. I can only relate this to having established such a durable immune system via my refined eating habits. I feel more mentally and physically capable than I have ever felt in my entire life, which is an encouraging awareness at 24.