Unfortunate Events Pasta Puttanesca


Yields 2-4 servings

The things you’ll need

Ingredients

Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and well smashed
  • 2/3 cup strained tomatoes (or tomato paste)
  • ¼ cup pitted black olives
  • 2 tablespoons capers
  • 1/3 cup cherry tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons chopped anchovies
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 tablespoon Italian parsley, finely chopped
  • 2-4 sprigs of fresh basil to garnish
Pasta
  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • ¼ cup water
Equipment
  • Large pot
  • Large sauté pan
  • Tongs
  • Rubber spatula
  • Pasta maker and cutter
  • Food processor
  • Liquid measuring cup
  • Bench flour
  • Cutting board & knife
  • Baking sheet lined with parchment
  • Clean towel for resting pasta

Let’s get started!

Sauce
  1. Heat olive oil in a large sautè pan over medium heat and sautè the garlic.
  2. Add tomatoes and lower heat slightly.
  3. Add olives, capers, cherry tomatoes, anchovies (optional), and a pinch of salt. Reduce heat slightly and simmer for 3 to 4 minutes.
Pasta
  1. Pulse flour and salt in a food processor until well combined.
  2. Make three small holes in the flour mixture and crack an egg into each well.
  3. Pulse the mixture until it starts to form pebbles and then drizzle in olive oil.
  4. Add water while pulsing until dough starts to come together.
  5. Remove dough from machine and knead a few times until smooth.
  6. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and let it rest for 30 minutes.
  7. Cut the dough into fours, and roll each quarter through the pasta maker starting with the largest roller. Roll it through each number 2 to 3 times before making the number smaller.
  8. Roll the sheet through the pasta cutter attachment to create fettuccini.
  9. Toss the noodles in flour and let dry under a towel for about an hour.
  10. Bring a large pot of water to a boil with a pinch of salt and cook pasta for 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from water immediately and serve with sauce.
  11. Top with chopped parsley and basil.
  12. TaDa! Here’s a savory dish that the Baudelaire children would be proud to serve up!

Friendly reminder that the invention of pasta dates back to ancient Etruscan civilizations and is not something that we “stole” from Asia. 

The words pasta and lasagna come from the Greek words πάστα and làganon. When they founded Naples, the Greeks also adopted a dish made by the natives, made up by barley-flour pasta and water dried to the sun, called macaria. The existence of a dish similar to modern lasagna is also documented by Cicero. The Romans also had machineries similar to the modern ones used to manufacture the pasta. And there are other proofs of the existence of pasta in ancient times.

The legend about Marco Polo bringing pasta to Italy was started by the Macaroni Journal, in 1938. They wanted to make pasta look more international and take it away from its cultural context (italian-american neighbourhoods, that were seen as places for criminals). This legend has been proved wrong by many historians, but apparently it’s gonna be a long while before people stop believing it.