past losses

Metas on the Theme of Loss

Just putting these together for organization reasons.

Aang and Loss
Aang and Zuko Coping with Loss
Aang and Zuko Dwelling on the Past
Katara and Loss
The Narrative Three and Loss 1
The Narrative Three and Loss 2
Zuko and Loss
Zuko, Katara and Loss

She won’t break you like those other girls will. That’s exactly why you’re terrified of her. She could make you happy. And you know being happy is the most terrifying thing in the universe. Once you’re happy it can be taken from you.
—  The girl who terrifies you

anonymous asked:

hey there! thanks for answering all our questions on this blog + how possible would it for someone to crack ribs with a solid kick? there's a character i have in mind that's escaping captivity, but they're also young, so i'm not quite sure how easily they'd be able to hurt the (adult) antagonist in such a manner, especially lacking any fighting experience to begin with?

Well, you can break someone’s ribs with a kick. That’s the entire purpose of the roundhouse, especially the version where you strike with the ball of the foot rather than the top of the foot. (And… aren’t like me when I was seven or eight, when I was new to sparring and totally stubbed my toe in another kid’s side at a tournament after my brain/body got confused between the two. I didn’t break my toe, but I could’ve.)

That story above is important, by the way. If you’ve got a character who doesn’t know how to fight then they’re not even going to get that far. If you don’t know how to kick then that’s a great way to get your leg caught by someone who knows what they’re doing. They catch the foot by the ankle, and then drag you wherever they want. That’s assuming the character can get their leg up and out without falling over. Even if they do manage that, say because they’ve watched a lot of martial arts flicks, they won’t know how to generate power and will be very slow. A, B, and C occur anyway. Your protagonist is going to end up back wherever they were being kept, this time in a much less comfortable position.

Even for an experienced martial artist, kicks require fairly constant bodily upkeep in order to be able to do them cold (much less perform them at all). That’s not a combat scenario, that’s just in general. You’ve got a great chance of pulling all the leg muscles you need to get away, including ones you didn’t realize you had and that’s if you don’t break your toes. Board breaks with the roundhouse kick are the most terrifying of them all because you’ve got to remember to curl your toes just right in order to carry your foot through the board.

Kicks are off the table.

More importantly, this is an exact rendition of the “Feel Good Violence” trope: My Instincts Performed A Wheel Kick.

The protagonist is suddenly and randomly enough good at fighting to not only fight, but win when making their first attempt at a violent altercation. They use techniques which require a fairly high level of dedication and aptitude out of “natural ability” and “instinct”.

Unless you’ve got an ironclad reason for invoking the trope (past lives/ immortality/memory loss/the matrix) it will undercut your narrative credibility in ways the story cannot recover from.

When you’ve cracked your foundation, you’re done.

“The only difference between reality and fiction is that fiction needs to be credible,” - Mark Twain

Narrative integrity is based on the rules or limitations we’ve set for ourselves, those limitations are the ironclad rules by which the narrative functions. They exist on two levels: in behavior and actions of characters within the world, and on a secondary level the setting’s behavior around them. Everything in your story must be working to uphold the fiction. When it doesn’t the audience’s “suspension of disbelief” starts to crack. You are beholden to the rules and limitations set down by your setting. Without them, you have no story.

When you’re setting out to create a character, there are four questions you should ask yourself:

1) What can the character do?

2) What can’t the character do?

3) What is the character willing to do but can’t?

4) What can the character do, but is unwilling to?

Within these four circles you have your character, their ethics/morals, and their limitations. That is the box you’ve created for yourself. It is important to own it and abide by it. When dealing with a protagonist, those limitations are not just the foundations of a character but the entire narrative.

Your character cannot fight your antagonist in a one on one and come away with any victory because you have established they don’t know how to. That is a limitation you set for yourself. That the audience knows and understands, so they will expect this character to act in accordance with it. They may want to walk up to the antagonist and kick them in the ribs so hard those ribs break, but they can’t. That desire could be a driving force behind them learning to fight later. As of now, though, their powerlessness in active violent conflict serves to reinforce the antagonist’s position. Reinforcing the antagonist’s position is for the narrative good.

They should be making choices based on the Venn diagram’s center: when what they can do meets what they are willing to do.

If what they can’t do conflicts with what they’re willing to do and they go with it anyway then the result is a failed escape attempt. A captive’s survival is based on their value. If they’re valuable enough for the antagonist to go through the trouble of capturing them in the first place, then they’re probably not going to be killed. At least, not until their value runs through. They lose and wind up back in captivity under more scrutiny, more security, and with fewer exit options. This reminds us why they were captured in the first place, and reinforces our villain’s position.

A protagonist can fail and retain their legitimacy many more times than an antagonist can. While this is a perfectly legitimate narrative outcome, I don’t think its the one you’re looking for.

This is the second issue with your question:

A narrative’s antagonist is its backbone.

Your antagonist is one of the most important pieces of your story, if not the most. They are the lingering threat, the shadow hovering over the story, and the knife at your protagonist’s throat. They are seventy percent threat, and the last thirty relies on their ability to make good on it.

One of the biggest mistakes an author can make is assuming their antagonist’s position in their narrative and the threat they provide are impervious to harm.

Unlike your protagonist, your antagonist is always in a precarious position. They must constantly re-affirm themselves and the threat they represent through their actions. That threat is all consuming and when challenged, it must either be defeated or confirmed.

If defeated, then the threat is gone.

If confirmed, then the threat level is heightened because now we imagine what they might do next.

An antagonist can re-affirm themselves after a defeat, but they’ve got to double down on their effort and create a new threat rather than relying on their old one. You as the author must work harder to make up for what you lost, and even then you’ll never have the initial fear ever again.

The first rule of the antagonist is: your capital is limited, so spend it wisely.

When you undercut an antagonist in favor of the protagonist before its necessary, you damage the antagonist’s credibility and, subsequently, their position in the story. When you lose your antagonist, you lose most of your narrative tension.

A character who doesn’t know how to do something is applying a limitation to the character. You are applying a restriction to what they can and can’t do. If you’re character doesn’t know how to fight, then fighting will be off the table. More importantly, having your character succeed at a skill set they have no experience in doesn’t make them “awesome” or “cool”, it means instead that the other characters who put time and effort into honing these skills suck.

When those characters are your antagonists… that hurts.

If you’ve got a protagonist with no hacking experience who manages to overcome a supposedly great hacker on their first or second go round with no time spent learning how to hack, then who looks bad? The second hacker. They’re the ones who are supposed to be good at hacking. If the narrative hinges on them being a major antagonist, then the author just shot their narrative in the foot.

Combat skills are the same way. They’re a skill set, not an instinct. They don’t come naturally, and take a great deal of time and effort to hone.

If your goal is to show your dangerous antagonist is a bumbling moron when an untrained teenager gets a lucky shot so miraculous they manage to lay them up for the rest of the story, then that’s a job well done.

If your goal is for the antagonist to maintain their credibility within the narrative? Don’t use them for a punching bag.

Violent confrontation is based just as much on threat of force as it is on the follow through. The threat is usually more frightening than what follows, and your protagonist is already challenging the fear by trying to escape. From a narrative perspective, if they get over their fear enough to challenge their antagonist directly then it’s game over. You spent your all capital either at the beginning or midway through the story, and you’re not getting it back.

Remember, your antagonist has to do just as much work to earn their street cred as your protagonist. Their position is a delicate balance of power management and threat of force. They rely on show over tell. They need to live up to whatever it is you’ve been saying about them. They need to be as dangerous as they’ve been puffed up to be, unless their reputation itself is the real antagonist. Never forget, your antagonist (whoever they are/whatever it is) is the backbone of your story. They are often the driving force of action, the reason why the protagonist is struggling, and the focal point. In some ways, they are more important than your protagonist because without them the protagonist’s got a whole lot of nothing.

When you undercut your antagonist, you also hurt your protagonist’s development. You cheat them of their chance for growth, and deny them their ability to show off whatever it is that they’re actually good at i.e. using their bravery, intelligence, and cleverness to sneak out.

If your protagonist beats down their Goliath at the beginning of (or even the middle) of the story then there’s no reason for them to go to the mountain master and learn to throw rocks.

-Michi

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3

This amethyst cluster has polished sides but the bottom and top have been left raw! Never seen one quite like this! 

Amethyst is a meditative stone due to its calming energy over both the emotional and physical parts of a person. This property also brings balance, patience. And restored harmony. Amethyst is used to bring sobriety, as well as healing negative pasts from loss and grief. It can also be used for spiritual work and psychic abilities. Available here

But the worse thing about growing up and getting older, is the way my friends just sort of drifted away. It is sad how someone can mean so much to you, and be such an important part of your life, and then, because of time, or other uncontrollable circumstances, you never see them again. For whatever reason they are gone, and you miss them, and everyday you hope and pray that you will see them again, if only for a second. But they go on without ever thinking of you, or knowing how much they have meant, or just how beautiful they are, and how your life will never be what you want it to be without them
—  Adam Stanley  All My Sins Remembered
Annulled

Fewer
words are spoken
here,
whispers of the past
lie awake,
and everything
else
drowns
in them,

you and me
are here too,
quietly screaming
to be heard,
muted and annulled
immersed,
beyond rescue
in the gray shallows
of loss.

© SoulReserve 2017

4

Jin Mutant AU

Info:
-More cautious than Namjoon when handling being mutants in public
-Mostly due to past family separation and loss trauma caused by being exposed
-Been trying to find Taehyung ever since they were violently separated as kids; main reason he went into covert operations under Big Hit (a mutant-based agency guised as a conglomerate)
-One of the best undercover agents they have, not only because of his powers but also because of his natural abilities to adapt and fit in
-expert in hand to hand combat

Lesson 11: Cosmic Witchcraft 101

By: Teacher Nova

Live class date and time: 1/19/2017 at 7:00pm CST

Cosmic witchcraft involves bonding with and utilizing celestial or planetary energy in your practice. You may choose to work with one celestial body or a multitude of them, calling upon their energy depending on your intent. In this lesson, we will discuss terminology associated with cosmic magick, and the correspondences associated with various celestial bodies.

What is a cosmic witch?

  • A cosmic witch, by my own definition, is a witch who utilizes planetary and celestial energy in their practice. While some witches tend to feel a connection with elements like earth, air, fire, and water, cosmic witches feel this connection with celestial bodies instead.
  • Some practitioners who practice planetary magick focus on the seven classic “planets” (I know the sun and moon aren’t planets but: Sun, Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn), whereas a cosmic witch includes the planets Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto as well.
  • A cosmic witch also includes the energy of other celestial bodies when appropriate, such as comets, asteroids, meteors, supernovas, stars/star clusters, galaxies, black holes, etc. We may not be able to see these specific occurrences with the naked eye (most of the time), but we know they exist and harness energy from them when we see fit.
  • A cosmic witch not only uses astrology in their practice, but also astronomy. The big difference here is that astrology is basically a form of divination using the placement of celestial bodies to analyze our emotions and behaviors. Astronomy, on the other hand, is a science that examines the positions, motions, and properties of these celestial bodies.
  • Astrology may be a cosmic witch’s preferred form of divination, but other mediums can be used. I like to use an oracle deck whose meanings are based on astrology, but I also enjoy using Elder Futhark runes and tarot cards. Perhaps a cosmic witch with a strong affinity for Lunar or Neptunian energy might take up water scrying; a cosmic witch who connects with Jupiter may want to use a pair of dice or playing cards; a cosmic witch who connects with Plutonian energy may utilize reading bones as a form of divination, etc.
  • Cosmic witches may worship deities and call upon them for assistance, the most common and relatable being those of Greco-Roman origin considering the planets were named after Roman and Greek Gods, but it is not required and we are not bound by religion. I personally worship the planets themselves, with a focus on Saturn.
  • Aside from deities, the belief in alien beings is totally plausible in the same way that some witches believe in fae or angels.
  • Cosmic witches are not limited to what kind of items they use in their practice: herbs, crystals, incense, sigils, charged water, and other things can be used to utilize and represent celestial energy.
  • The timing used for spells can be based on a variety of things, such as planetary positions/alignments, lunar cycles, days of the week as they correspond to the planet the day was named for, or planetary hours.
  • Astral travel is useful for cosmic witches if they decide to travel within the cosmos, being able to “visit” and visualize the different celestial bodies in their own way.
  • Cosmic witches may use celestial energy to ground, center, and cleanse themselves (and other objects), instead of “earth grounding” or other common methods.

 

Terminology:

Astral - connected to or resembling the stars

Celestial - relating to the sky or outer space

Celestial Body - any natural body that exists outside of Earth’s atmosphere

Chaos - the void before the universe or cosmos was created

Cosmic - relating to the universe or cosmos

Jovian - relating to Jupiter

Lunar - relating to the Moon

Martian - relating to Mars

Mercurian - relating to Mercury

Natal Chart - a chart that shows the position of the planets and other celestial bodies at the time of your birth

Neptunian - relating to Neptune

Planetary - relating to the planets

Plutonian - relating to Pluto

Saturnian - relating to Saturn

Solar - relating to the Sun

Stellar - relating to the stars

Uranian - relating to Uranus

Venusian - relating to Venus

Zodiac - a circle of celestial longitude divided into 12 sections, each section represented by a different astrological sign

Correspondences for each planet: (I personally believe these correspondences to originate from the deity they were each named for)

Moon -

Associations: Emotions, moods, peace, dreams, imagination, the unconscious mind, memory, safe travel, protection, psychic abilities, balance, sensitivity, nostalgia

Botanicals: Cabbage, datura, evening primrose, honeysuckle, hydrangea, iris, jasmine, juniper, lemon, lotus, mallow, moonwort, morning glory, mugwort, myrtle, orris root, sandalwood, sweet pea, violet, watercress, water lily, white rose, wild lettuce, willow

Crystals: Moonstone, selenite, pearl, milky quartz, aquamarine

Metals: Silver

Colors: Silver, white, light blue

Numbers: 2

Elements: Water

Zodiac Signs: Cancer
Day of the Week: Monday

Sun -

Associations: Self-confidence, self-awareness, success, leadership, health, employment, pride, self-centeredness, ambition, money, optimism, potency, courage, generosity, nobility

Botanicals: Bergamot, buttercup, calamus, calendula, cedar, celandine, centaury, chamomile, cinnamon, citronella, frankincense, heliotrope, hibiscus, laurel, mandarin, marigold, orange, peony, poppy, rosemary, rue, saffron, st. john’s wort, sunflower

Crystals: Topaz, citrine, goldstone, gold, amber, carnelian, tiger’s eye

Metals: Gold

Colors: Gold, red, orange, yellow

Numbers: 1

Elements: Fire

Zodiac Signs: Leo

Day of the Week: Sunday

Mercury -

Associations: Communication, learning, memory, comprehension, intellect, agility, good fortune, gratitude, gain, exchanges, trade, reason, duality, education, travel

Botanicals: Almond, bladderwrack, caraway, cassia, celery, clover, eucalyptus, fennel, fenugreek, heather, jasmine, lavender, lemongrass, lily, mandrake, marjoram, mint (peppermint, spearmint), narcissus, parsley, sandalwood, sweet pea, valerian, wintergreen, wormwood

Crystals: Blue lace agate, fire agate, aventurine, opal, alexandrite, mottled jasper, citrine

Metals: Mercury/quicksilver

Colors: Green, yellow, purple

Numbers: 5

Elements: Air

Zodiac Signs: Gemini, Virgo

Day of the Week: Wednesday

Venus -

Associations: Cooperation, unity, agreements, originality, creativity, beauty, love, companionship, fertility, joy, romance, peace, sexuality

Botanicals: Apple, bergamot, cashew, daffodil, daisy, damiana, geranium, goldenrod, hibiscus, larkspur, lavender, lemon verbena, lilac, passion flower, peach, plantain, primrose, raspberry, rose, spearmint, strawberry, tansy, thyme, vanilla, violet, yarrow, ylang ylang

Crystals: Emerald, jade, rose quartz, celestite, turquoise, peridot, malachite, sodalite, coral

Metals: Copper

Colors: Pink, green, aqua, peach

Numbers: 6

Elements: Earth

Zodiac Signs: Taurus, Libra

Day of the Week: Friday

Mars -

Associations: Power, lust, force, passion, will, courage, physical strength, war, male virility, energy, action, independence, practicality, protection

Botanicals: Acacia, allspice, basil, black pepper, calamus, cardamom, cassava, chives, coriander, cumin, dragon’s blood, garlic, ginger, hawthorn, hyacinth, nettle, onion, patchouli, pennyroyal, rue, thistle, turmeric

Crystals: Ruby, garnet, red jasper, bloodstone, sardonyx, lavastone, red tourmaline

Metals: Iron

Colors: Red, brown

Numbers: 9

Elements: Fire

Zodiac Signs: Aries

Day of the Week: Tuesday

Jupiter -

Associations: Gain, riches, prosperity, wealth, success, luck, self-confidence, investment, gatherings, favors, ambition, mercy, humanity, publicity 

Botanicals: Anise, bayberry, bergamot, blessed thistle, carnation, catnip, chamomile, cinquefoil, clove, clover, corn, crampbark, eyebright, hops, hyssop, nutmeg, oak, sage, stevia, tulip

Crystals: Yellow sapphire, yellow apatite, yellow jasper, green aventurine, azurite, lepidolite, kyanite

Metals: Tin

Colors: Blue, purple, yellow

Numbers: 3

Elements: Air

Zodiac Signs: Sagittarius

Day of the Week: Thursday

Saturn -

Associations: Safety, protection, intellect, life lessons, loss, past lives, law, justice, sincerity, restraint, discipline, responsibility, caution, time, chaos

Botanicals: Black poppy seeds, bluebell, comfrey, cypress, daffodil, datura, elm, foxglove, garlic, hemlock, hemp, holly, mandrake, mullein, myrrh, nightshade, patchouli, rosemary, skullcap, snowdrop, thyme, tobacco, valerian, vetiver, wolfsbane (aconite, monkshood), wintergreen, witch hazel

Crystals: Hematite, jet, onyx, obsidian, blue sapphire, halite, black tourmaline, black diamond, garnet

Metals: Lead

Colors: Black, maroon, purple, yellow

Numbers: 8

Elements: Earth

Zodiac Signs: Capricorn

Day of the Week: Saturday

Uranus -

Associations: Changes, revolution, independence, freedom, clairvoyance, disruption, metaphysics, higher consciousness, intuition, technology

Botanicals: Calamus, chamomile, cinnamon, clove, coffee, eucalyptus, ginger, guarana, kava kava, lime, nutmeg, orange blossom, pansy, pokeweed, Solomon’s seal

Crystals: Quartz, diamond, aquamarine, amazonite, blue topaz, tanzanite, opalite, aqua aura

Metals: Uranium

Colors: Blue, purple, white

Numbers: 4

Elements: Air

Zodiac Signs: Aquarius

Day of the Week: Wednesday

Neptune -

Associations: Confusion, mysticism, imagination, illusion, chaos, divination, inner vision, perception, sacrifice, inspiration, emotions, compassion

Botanicals: Hemp, honeysuckle, jasmine, lobelia, lotus, melon, morning glory, mugwort, orange blossom, pine, poppy, skullcap, water lily, wild lettuce, willow, wisteria 

Crystals: Sapphire, amethyst, turquoise, fluorite, labradorite, aquamarine, celestite, vauxite

Metals: Platinum

Colors: Blue, grey, aqua, lavender

Numbers: 7

Elements: Water

Zodiac Signs: Pisces

Day of the Week: Friday

Pluto -

Associations: Death, the underworld, astral travel, realms, transformation, metamorphosis, cooperation, regeneration, mystery, power, change, crisis 

Botanicals: Acacia, barley, basil, chrysanthemum, columbine, cypress, damiana, dogwood, dragon’s blood, eucalyptus, fern, foxglove, galangal root, hops, larkspur, oats, pansy, passion flower, psilocybin, saw palmetto, silverweed, skullcap, strawberry, valerian, wheat, yohimbe 

Crystals: Smoky quartz, snowflake obsidian, black tourmaline, kunzite

Metals: Plutonium

Colors: Black, white

Numbers: 0

Elements: Water

Zodiac Signs: Scorpio

Day of the Week: Tuesday

Correspondences for other celestial bodies:

Asteroids, Comets, & Minor Planets

[] Ceres (dwarf planet) - named for the Roman goddess of agriculture, grain crops, motherly love, and fertility: nurturing, love, comfort, growth, compassion, fertility

[] Chiron (comet) - in Greek mythology, he was a centaur, the foster son of Apollo, and the biological son of Cronus - his most notable abilities included healing, prophecy, wisdom, and intelligence: wisdom, patience, life lessons, self-worth, perseverance, relief, healing

[⇨⇦] Eris (dwarf planet) - named for the Greek goddess of strife and discord: discord, rivalry, jealousy, revenge, battles, power, resourcefulness, clarity 

[] Eros (asteroid) - named for the Greek god of love: sexuality, intimacy, passion, desire, creativity, unity 

[] Hygieia (asteroid) - named for the goddess of health, cleanliness, and hygiene; was the daughter of Asclepius, the god of medicine: balance, satisfaction, indulgence, health concerns of all kinds - hygiene, medicine, vaccines, fitness, nutrition, illness

[] Juno (asteroid/minor planet) - Roman goddess of marriage and childbirth; said to be the highest goddess; sister of Saturn, and wife of Jupiter: attraction, commitment, beauty, companionship, compromise, security 

[] Lilith (asteroid/dark moon/black moon) - Lilith is the name given to a few different celestial bodies in the cosmos - the first one being an asteroid, the second being a hypothetical satellite that orbits between the moon and the earth, the third being used to describe the earth’s moon at its farthest point from the earth (black moon) - in biblical mythology, Lilith was Adam’s first wife who escaped the Garden of Eden after refusing to be subservient to Adam, and went on to procreate with demonic creatures - some say she was a demon herself - this is possibly due to the rise of patriarchal society: independence, temptation, consequence, fear, suffering, limitations, crisis, conflict 

[] Pallas (asteroid) - also known as Pallas Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom, craft, and war: creativity, power, intuition, justice, wisdom, protection

[] Psyche (asteroid) - former mortal and goddess of the soul in Greek mythology - wife to Eros: unconscious mind, self-actualization, truth, perseverance, trials, transformation 

[] Vesta (asteroid/minor planet) - Roman goddess of hearth, home, and family: focus, dedication, passion, mental clarity, self-respect, diligence, purification

Other:

Asteroid (a small rocky body orbiting the sun) - strength, protection, stability, courage

Aurora (a natural light produced when the magnetosphere of earth is disturbed by solar wind) - peace, spirituality, guidance, enlightenment

Black Hole (a region of the cosmos that exhibits such strong gravitational effects that nothing—not even particles and electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from inside it) - darkness, destruction, absorption, banishing 

Comet (a celestial body composed of ice and other debris) - stillness, isolation, balance, control, transformation 

Dark Matter (matter that does not emit or interact with electromagnetic radiation, thus making it invisible) - invisibility, protection, shielding

Meteor (the visible passage of a meteoroid, asteroid, or comet passing through earth’s atmosphere, causing a streak of light in the sky) - hope, wishes, luck, fortune, wealth 

Nebula (an interstellar cloud of gas) - foundation, illumination, radiance, renewal, cleansing

Star Cluster (groups of stars) - unity, strength, peace

Supernova (a stellar explosion that occurs during the last stages of a star’s life) - energy, illumination, manifestation, destruction, rebirth, cleansing

Lunar Phases:

New Moon (the first phase of the moon; the moon is not visible because it is in the sun’s shadow) – new beginnings, health, cleansing, inner harmony, peace, love

Waxing Crescent (right side of moon visible by 1% to 49%) – growth, wealth, prosperity, luck, attraction

First Quarter (right side of moon visible by 50%) – balance, decision-making, challenges 

Waxing Gibbous (right side of moon visible by 51% to 99%) – motivation, positivity, success, attraction

Full Moon (moon is 100% visible) – power, cleansing, charging, healing, divination, emotions, psychic awareness, enlightenment, banishing

Waning Gibbous (left side of moon visible by 51% to 99%) – reassessment, letting go, clearing away, cleansing, releasing, undoing bindings, opening up, making amends, making space

Third Quarter (left side of moon visible by 50%) – letting go, banishing, breaking bad habits

Waning Crescent (left side of moon visible by 1% to 49%) – achievement, rest, peace, deep wisdom, completion, banishing 

Dark Moon (the moon during the time where it is not visible in the backdrop of the sky; the new moon occurs during this time) – retreat, reflection of self, destruction, banishing, justice

Blue Moon (the third of four full moons in a season, or a second full moon in a month of the common calendar) – achieving goals, focus, major wishes and dreams, divination

Black Moon (has 4 meanings: a month with 2 new moons, a month with no new moons, a season with 4 new moons, or a month without a full moon) – power, manifestation

Homework: complete your natal/birth chart (astro.com > extended chart selection > fill out your info > select “pullen/astrolog” > select “simple chart delineation” from the dropdown menu > scroll down about ¾ of the way and find the section of the report that has percentages of the planets, zodiac signs, elements, etc.), and find out what your dominant planet is. In the chart, your dominant planet will be the one with the highest percentage. Do you resonate with that particular planet? If not, which planet do you like the most and why? Your favorite celestial body that is not a planet? Why?

Next week’s lesson:

Cosmic Witchcraft 101: Lesson 2 - incorporating cosmic magick into your daily life

Sorry but I’m bored of *~precious~* (aka weak-willed) England and The Top ™ France give me men who have fought against each other, for each other , with each other, who have spent 1000 years hating each other and loving each other and everything in between. Give me Arthur, a man who used to be an empire, who used to radiate power still learning to cope with just being England, learning that the others don’t see him the same, that he’s no longer a king amongst men. Give me Francis faking a smile and having to accept being seen as the flirt, the predator, the pretty face, the player, while he quietly tries to deal with pain, depression, a past of war and loss and still maintain the ‘big brother France’ act he has going on. Just, please, give me some 3D, in depth characters who are hurt and struggling to adjust to the modern world. P l e a s e.

“Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter - tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther….And one fine morning — So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (published: 10 April 1925)

2

Amethyst is a meditative stone due to its calming energy over both the emotional and physical parts of a person. This property also brings balance, patience. And restored harmony. Amethyst is used to bring sobriety, as well as healing negative pasts from loss and grief. It can also be used for spiritual work and psychic abilities.

A druzy crystal is made of up tiny crystal that put off sparkles; they are known to bring light, love, and joy! They are known to bring harmony as well as advancing the energies of nearby crystals.

  Available here!