passes,

3

I did a couple of passes for this same shot. This one is a very short yet hard shot for me to do. 

My 1st pass is a very old take, and the early design of the character didn’t really have a focused direction - so it needed to be redone for sure. I realize he’s probably doing a bit too much for this scene; it being borderline over-acted.


The 2nd pass was definitely a lot more controlled, but I felt it lacked the intensity from the 1st pass. It was not dynamic enough, and the character felt like he wasn’t emotionally in the scene. It felt like he was just gliding to the poses, so it didn’t really have enough character to it. (Also, it’s evenly timed…)

The 3rd pass, I actually got advice and feedback from my friend Rune - who helped me figure out the poses. Draftsmanship and clear drawing are some of my wain weaknesses, so its always great to have someone else point out what causes the issues. Its pushed, yet more controlled and simplified. The gun leaving the screen as he swings adds a dynamism to the animation. It’s much snappier, for this being part of an action segment; it makes sense. I’ll have to come back and fix the drawing a bit so its a bit closer to the model of the 2nd, but I definitely learned a lot from re doing this shot a bunch. 

Alfredo Piola

A Day With the Man Who Brings Museum Works to City Walls

In 1877, William-Adolphe Bouguereau painted “Le Jeunesse at l’Amour,” a sensuous nude shouldering a playful angel, a work now hanging on the main level of the Musée d’Orsay. In early June, Julien de Casabianca pasted an oversize simulacrum of the figures on the wall of nondescript building in the 18th Arrondissement. 

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