partovi

4

Our founder Hadi Partovi helps Peru launch the #HourOfCode, with the Minister and Vice Minister of Education, and amazing students and student leaders

Oh hai, Tumblr!

We’re interrupting your regularly-scheduling reblogs to share some exciting news - you may have noticed that we’ve got a new intern helping us out on the ole NPR Tumblr, and she’s pretty awesome so we want to officially introduce you to her. Everyone, meet Vesta:

Hi! I come to D.C. in ✌ from the perpetually summery, concrete- & palm-tree- bound metropolis of Los Angeles. I just graduated from UCLA with a degree in Film, Television and Digital Media. I spent an intense couple years there developing my voice as a storyteller and mediamaker (film/digital/Web).

I always had a hunch, though, that working in Hollywood wasn’t the right fit for me. So I tried it out and realized I was right. I don’t like traditional film production or Hollywood’s gravitation toward lucrative blockbusters. I love nonfiction storytelling and socially responsible media. That’s why I chose the concentration I did (“interpretive” — a fancy word for experimental — digital media) and dedicated my senior year to researching, coding and filming Greenspaces, a participatory media installation in Los Angeles.

I'm here now, delving into creative possibilities at the intersection of social tech & storytelling. I like art, film, food, and fluffy things. 

…and while we’re at it, we thought this would be a good time to formally introduce ourselves, your NPR Tumblr mavens/webmasters/writers of terrible puns!

So hi, I’m Ariel, and I’m a photo editor for NPR.org. I used to work here, and I helped start this, and I’m a big fan of this lil gal. Also, people tell me a *lot* of Little Mermaid jokes… you know, bc of the name or whatever.

Originally posted by disneyboost

Hiya, I’m Emily and I’m a producer for NPR.org (and I sit right next to Ariel)! I started at NPR as an intern four years ago and before that I interned here and here. I love dogs but I’m highly allergic to them, so dog GIFs are perfect for my lifestyle.

Originally posted by animalgifdaily

It may not seem like it sometimes, but we do read every piece of mail y’all send our way. So while we’ve got your attention, we thought we’d *also* address the most common message we get from you guys:

“Tagging your name to every comment is clearly the mark of a person over 40.“

Fun fact: Despite our penchant to reblog cute animals and the latest trend in knitting, we’re actually not 40! FWIW, we’re all solidly millennials and [mostly] digital natives. We like to sign our posts here (unlike on our personal Tumblrs) so y’all know who’s reblogging what, and who’s making which bad jokes. (Emily’s jokes are way better than mine. -Ariel) (That’s debatable. -Emily)

Originally posted by spoopylitus

So send us more notes, tell us what you like and don’t like, and *definitely* check us on our old-lady style. This is why we love you guys.

-Ariel, Emily, & Vesta

Why Coding Is Your Child’s Key to Unlocking the Future

Educators call for making computer science a cornerstone of the curriculum, even for grade-school kids

Racing across the U.S. in your taco truck, you must fight off animals mutated by fallout from a nuclear war, and you must also turn them into delicious filling for the tacos you sell inside fortified towns. Your mission: Make it to the Canadian city of Winnipeg.

You are “Gunman Taco Truck.”

“It’s pretty much only a game that a kid would come up with,” says Brenda Romero, a videogame designer for more than 30 years and the mother of Donovan Romero-Brathwaite, the 10-year-old inventor of the game.

And yet GTT already has been licensed by a videogame publisher for Mac, PC, iOS and Android, and may also arrive on consoles. It’s quite an outcome for something born of Saturday programming lessons with Donovan’s dad John, also a videogame designer of note.

Donovan’s situation—access to two parents who are both programmers—is rare. In fact, in record numbers, children are picking up a skill their parents don’t possess: coding.

And according to those responsible for teaching them, programming is just the beginning. What those kids are learning now—what they must learn, if they hope to be employable in the 21st century—is something educators call “procedural literacy.”

“When you learn to code, you start thinking about processes in the world,” says Mitchell Resnick, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor heading up the effort to build the child-friendly programming language Scratch.

Scratch has 6.2 million registered users and is accessible to children as young as five.

Whether it’s understanding how complicated systems like economies work or tackling a problem in a stepwise fashion, coding is uniquely suited to training children not just how to solve problems, but also how to express themselves, says Mr. Resnick.

“What’s fascinating about computer science is that it requires analytical skills, problem solving and creativity, while also being both foundational and vocational,” says Hadi Partovi, co-founder of Code.org, a nonprofit organization that promotes coding education. “I’m not sure there’s any other field that’s all those combined.”

Not every child who learns to write will become a novelist, nor everyone who learns algebra a mathematician, yet we treat both as foundational skills that all children should learn. Coding is the same, say educators like Messrs. Partovi and Mr. Resnick, who are pushing for it to be available to every child in America.

read more 

indiewire.com
The Best Indie Movies of 2014 So Far, According to Criticwire: 'Calvary' and 'The Strange Little Cat' Join the List

The Top-Rated Films of 2014

1. Boyhood (Film Page), directed by Richard Linklater (2014 Sundance Film Festival; July 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A (60 grades)

2. Ida (Film Page), directed by Pawel Pawlikowski (2013 Telluride Film Festival; May 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A (30 grades)

3. Only Lovers Left Alive (Film Page), directed by Jim Jarmusch (2013 Cannes Film Festival; April 2014 theatrical release) 
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (71 grades)

4. The Grand Budapest Hotel (Film Page), directed by Wes Anderson (2014 Berlin International Film Festival; March 2014 theatrical release) 
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (64 grades)

4. Under the Skin (Film Page), directed by Jonathan Glazer (2013 Telluride Film Festival; April 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (64 grades)

6. Blue Ruin (Film Page), directed by Jeremy Saulnier (2013 Cannes Film Festival; April 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (51 grades)

6. The Wind Rises (Film Page), directed by Hayao Miyazaki (2013 Venice Film Festival; February 2014 theatrical release) 
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (51 grades)

8. Stranger by the Lake (Film Page), directed by Alain Guiraudie (2013 Cannes Film Festival; January 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (46 grades)

9. Life Itself (Film Page), directed by Steve James (2014 Sundance Film Festival; July 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (44 grades)

10. Nymphomaniac, Vol. 1 (Film Page), directed by Lars von Trier (2014 Berlin International Film Festival; March 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (43 grades)

11. Gloria (Film Page), directed by Sebastián Lelio (2013 Berlin International Film Festival; January 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (38 grades)

11. Like Father, Like Son (Film Page), directed by Hirokazu Kore-eda (2013 Cannes Film Festival; January 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (38 grades)

13. Tim’s Vermeer (Film Page), directed by Teller (2013 Toronto International Film Festival; January 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (33 grades)

14. Obvious Child (Film Page), directed by Gillian Robespierre (2014 Sundance Film Festival; June 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (31 grades)

15. Closed Curtain (Film Page), directed by Jafar Panahi & Kambuzia Partovi (2013 Berlin International Film Festival; July 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (26 grades)

16. We are the Best! (Film Page), directed by Lukas Moodysson (2013 Toronto International Film Festival; May 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (25 grades)

17. Cheap Thrills (Film Page), directed by E.L. Katz (2013 SXSW Film Festival; March 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (24 grades)

18. Ernest and Celestine (Film Page), directed by Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar and Benjamin Renner (2012 Cannes Film Festival; February 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (22 grades)

19. Manakamana (Film Page), directed by Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez (2013 Locarno Film Festival; April 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (21 grades)

20. The Missing Picture (Film Page), directed by Rithy Panh (2013 Cannes Film Festival; March 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (19 grades)

21. Finding Vivian Maier (Film Page), directed by John Maloof and Charlie Siskel (2013 Toronto International Film Festival; March 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (18 grades)

22. The Last of the Unjust (Film Page), directed by Claude Lanzmann (2013 Cannes Film Festival; February 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (17 grades)

23. Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me (Film Page), directed by Chiemi Karasawa (2013 Tribeca Film Festival; February 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (15 grades)

24. The Strange Little Cat (Film Page), directed by Ramon Zürcher (2013 Berlin International Film Festival; August 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: A- (15 grades)

25. The Immigrant (Film Page), directed by James Gray (2013 Cannes Film Festival; May 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (47 grades)

26. The Raid 2: Berandal (Film Page), directed by Gareth Evans (2014 Sundance Film Festival; March 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (39 grades)

26. Snowpiercer (Film Page), directed by Bong Joon-ho (2013 Korean premiere; June 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (39 grades)

28. The Double (Film Page), directed by Richard Ayoade (2013 Toronto International Film Festival; May 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (37 grades)

29. Jodorowsky’s Dune (Film Page), directed by Frank Pavich (2013 Cannes Film Festival; March 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (32 grades)

29. Cold in July (Film Page), directed by Jim Mickle (2014 Sundance Film Festival; May 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (31 grades)

29. The Unknown Known: The Life and Times of Donald Rumsfeld (Film Page), directed by Errol Morris (2013 Telluride Film Festival; April 2014 release date)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (31 grades)

31. Joe (Film Page), directed by David Gordon Green (2013 Venice Film Festival; April 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (30 grades)

32. Enemy (Film Page), directed by Denis Villeneuve (2013 Toronto International Film Festival; March 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (29 grades)

32. Locke (Film Page), directed by Steven Knight (2013 Venice Film Festival; April 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (29 grades)

32. Omar (Film Page), directed by Hany Abu-Assad (2013 Cannes Film Festival; February 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (29 grades)

35. The Lunchbox (Film Page), directed by Ritesh Batra (2013 Cannes Film Festival; February 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (25 grades)

36. A Most Wanted Man (Film Page), directed by Anton Corbijn (2014 Sundance Film Festival; July 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (24 grades)

36. Le Week-End (Film Page), directed by Roger Michell (2013 Toronto International Film Festival; March 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (24 grades)

38. Chef (Film Page), directed by Jon Favreau (2014 SXSW Film Festival; May 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (23 grades)

38. Vic + Flo Saw a Bear (Film Page), directed by Denis Côté (2013 Berlin International Film Festival; February 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (23 grades)

40. Calvary (Film Page), directed by John Michael McDonagh (2014 Sundance Film Festival; August 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (20 grades)

40. Child’s Pose (Film Page), directed by Calin Peter Netzer (2013 Berlin International Film Festival; February 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (20 grades)

42. It Felt Like Love (Film Page), directed by Eliza Hittman (2013 Sundance Film Festival; March 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (18 grades)

43. The Dance of Reality (Film Page), directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky (2013 Cannes Film Festival; May 2014 theatrical release)
Average Criticwire Rating: B+ (17 grades)

6

No matter where you live, being a 15-year-old girl can be tough. For some girls, it’s a fight for independence, the fight to be first in class, or even the fight to win a boy’s heart.

For others, it’s a fight to stay safe from deadly gang violence, the fight against being trapped in an early marriage, or the fight to play sports considered off limits for girls.

During the month of October, NPR Goats and Soda is on a mission to capture the collective experience of being 15 around the world through social media. This action is part of #15Girls, a series about girls who take risks, break rules and defy stereotypes to create a better life for themselves. The objective: Connect you, our audience, with these girls by sharing your own stories.

Read all the #15Girls stories here

We’re asking you to post a photo of yourself as a teen, with the answer to this question: What was the hardest thing about being 15?

We welcome submissions from everyone. No answer is too big or too small — everyone has a story to tell.

Share your answers on Twitter or Instagram by tagging @NPR with the hashtag #15Girls. Make sure to include your name, location and current age, and if you’re posting a group photo, tell us which person you are.

Share Your Story: What Was The Hardest Thing About Being 15?

Photos: Courtesy of Yasmine San Pedro, Malaka Gharib, Vesta Partovi, Khadija Ahmad, Raliya Nura, Encarni Pindado for NPR

The Deal With Tumblr

If you’re reading this, you probably use Tumblr. Congrats! You’re one of over 420 million users. I am too. I’ve been using the microblogging website actively for over five years now. That’s just one year less than NPR has (thanks for keeping us on top of the game, Wright).

Tumblr is my favorite social platform. (If you need convincing as to why it’s relevant: it’s also the fastest growing one, according to Global Web Index research from last year). I like it because it helps me discover stuff I care about — be it information, art, ideas, writing, cute mammals. I’ve also learned a lot of things from Tumblr, things I arguably should have learned about first in school. No, I did not rely on the Internet for my bachelor’s degree. But it would also be wrong to say it didn’t play a definitive role in shaping my interests, feeding my intellect and sparking my passion for civic engagement. I know my sister (who’s what they’re now calling Gen Z), as well as my similarly generationed friends, would agree. Tumblr rocks. It’s beneficial and fun. Like your really cool friend who’s always on top of things and makes you think and laugh a ton.

So why am I going on about this? Wright asked me to give some thought to the future of our main NPR Tumblr. Also, I got in a tiff with another intern last month about the legitimacy of social media as a news source. Our consensus: it’s requisite and relevant for the general news consumer, but ~serious journalists~ will, as they should, be skeptical first and confirm information via reliable sources.

Like a mega creeper, I spent last month looking at competitors and thinking about what we should be doing with our Tumblr moving forward. Here’s what I came up with.

What NPR does now:

We push our great digital content. We mix it up with

They’re mixed pretty evenly between all npr.org topics.

We reblog NPR shows/desks and member station content.

  • This  supports our intra-Tumblr community**
  • It’s also great for cross-promotion between shows/desks that have large followings in and of themselves. (skunkbearfresh air — looking at you)

** This could potentially be a bad thing, however, if we have too many NPR-related Tumblrs. It could spread our brand too thin, making us seem clunky and difficult to keep track of.

We reblog other Tumblrs we follow.

  • It’s where we source most of what I’m going to call “fun stuff,” which is a big part of Tumblr.
  • We always sign our reblogs to keep us — the curators — human, accountable (and hopefully hilarious).

What we don’t do as much, and I think should be done more:

We should reblog and engage with our followers.

(Here, they’ve reblogged a follower’s reblog of their post, because it was funny. This is the greatest nod of acknowledgement to the follower. Tumblr is all about reblogging. Also, I really dig their Overheard at the Washington Post series.)

That brings me to,

We should tap more into gifs, memes, and TTT (Tumblr trending things) —all important parts of the culture of Tumblr.


  • We can incorporate these into our reblogs and engagements.

(This GIF-off is an A+ example of this. If we’re doing it on Facebook, we should do it on Tumblr!)

We should have more fun, without losing our integrity.

  • This is pretty self explanatory. We don’t want our followers to think we aren’t a ~serious news blog~. People expect a certain approach from us and we want to remain true to that identity. That being said, each social platform is different and we should definitely adapt our voice and presence to each one. I think it would do us well to make our Tumblr a bit more Tumblr-y. We’re always going to have npr.org and Facebook for straight pushes of our content. If we play our cards right and tailor appropriately, I suspect the Tumblr community will love us even more than they already do.

- Vesta

I was fascinated by this 'low-tech' concept

Steve Jobs was a low-tech parent

While many parents allow their children to bathe in the glow of tablets, smartphones and computers day and night, Steve Jobs limited the time his kids spent on gadgets at home.

Talk time: Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.

When Steve Jobs was running Apple, he was known to call journalists to either pat them on the back for a recent article or, more often than not, explain how they got it wrong. I was on the receiving end of a few of those calls. But nothing shocked me more than something Jobs said to me in late 2010 after he had finished chewing me out for something I had written about an iPad shortcoming.

“So, your kids must love the iPad?” I asked Jobs, trying to change the subject. The company’s first tablet was just hitting the shelves.

“They haven’t used it,” he told me. “We limit how much technology our kids use at home.”

I’m sure I responded with a gasp and dumbfounded silence. I had imagined the Jobs’ household was like a nerd’s paradise: that the walls were giant touch screens, the dining table was made from tiles of iPads and that iPods were handed out to guests like chocolates on a pillow.

Nope, Jobs told me, not even close.

Since then, I’ve met a number of technology chief executives and venture

Digital dangers: Apple co founder Steve Jobs restricted his children from using the company’s gadgets at home. Photo: (Photo Illustration by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

capitalists who say similar things: They strictly limit their children’s screen time, often banning all gadgets on school nights and allocating ascetic time limits on weekends.

I was perplexed by this parenting style. After all, most parents seem to take the opposite approach, letting their children bathe in the glow of tablets, smartphones and computers, day and night.

Yet these tech CEO’s seem to know something the rest of us don’t.

Chris Anderson, the former editor of Wired and now chief executive of 3D Robotics, a drone-maker, has instituted time limits and parental controls on every device in his home.

“My kids accuse me and my wife of being fascists and overly concerned about tech, and they say that none of their friends have the same rules,” he said of his five children, age 6-17. “That’s because we have seen the dangers of technology firsthand. I’ve seen it in myself, I don’t want to see that happen to my kids.”

The dangers he is referring to include exposure to harmful content like pornography, bullying from other kids, and perhaps worst of all, becoming addicted to their devices, just like their parents.

Alex Constantinople, the chief executive of the OutCast Agency, a tech-focused communications and marketing firm, said her youngest son, who is 5, is never allowed to use gadgets during the week, and her older children, 10-13, are allowed only 30 minutes a day on school nights.

Evan Williams, a founder of Blogger, Twitter and Medium, and his wife, Sara Williams, said that in lieu of iPads, their two young boys have hundreds of books (yes, physical ones) that they can pick up and read anytime.

So how do tech moms and dads determine the proper boundary for their children? In general, it is set by age.

Children under 10 seem to be most susceptible to becoming addicted, so these parents draw the line at not allowing any gadgets during the week. On weekends, there are limits of 30 minutes to two hours on iPad and smartphone use. And 10- to 14-year-olds are allowed to use computers on school nights, but only for homework.

“We have a strict no-screen-time-during-the-week rule for our kids,” said Lesley Gold, founder and chief executive of the SutherlandGold Group, a tech media relations and analytics company. “But you have to make allowances as they get older and need a computer for school.”

Some parents also forbid teenagers to use social networks, except for services like Snapchat, which deletes messages after they have been sent. This way they don’t have to worry about saying something online that will haunt them later in life, one executive told me.

Although some nontech parents I know give smartphones to children as young as 8, many who work in tech wait until their child is 14. While these teenagers can make calls and text, they are not given a data plan until 16. But there is one rule that is universal among the tech parents I polled.

“This is rule No. 1: There are no screens in the bedroom. Period. Ever,” Anderson said.

While some tech parents assign limits based on time, others are much stricter about what their children are allowed to do with screens.

Ali Partovi, a founder of iLike and adviser to Facebook, Dropbox and Zappos, said there should be a strong distinction between time spent “consuming,” like watching YouTube or playing video games, and time spent “creating” on screens.

“Just as I wouldn’t dream of limiting how much time a kid can spend with her paintbrushes, or playing her piano, or writing, I think it’s absurd to limit her time spent creating computer art, editing video, or computer programming,” he said.

Others said that outright bans could backfire and create a digital monster.

Dick Costolo, chief executive of Twitter, told me he and his wife approved of unlimited gadget use as long as their two teenage children were in the living room. They believe that too many time limits could have adverse effects on their children.

“When I was at the University of Michigan, there was this guy who lived in the dorm next to me, and he had cases and cases of Coca-Cola and other sodas in his room,” Costolo said. “I later found out that it was because his parents had never let him have soda when he was growing up. If you don’t let your kids have some exposure to this stuff, what problems does it cause later?”

I never asked Jobs what his children did instead of using the gadgets he built, so I reached out to Walter Isaacson, the author of Steve Jobs, who spent a lot of time at their home.

“Every evening, Steve made a point of having dinner at the big, long table in their kitchen, discussing books and history and a variety of things,” he said. “No one ever pulled out an iPad or computer. The kids did not seem addicted at all to devices.”

taylorgetsedgy  asked:

Can anyone watch the hour of code videos when they're streaming live on YouTube? There's a few I really want to see but I'm not part of a school signed up for the program, and I'm not sure if that makes a difference.

Yes, anyone can watch them live on Youtube. Here are all the links (and the ones that already happened are up for you the watch in archive):

TUESDAY, December 9 
10:00 AM PST - Lyndsey Scott 
12:00 PM PST - Jack Dorsey 
3:00 PM PST - Ashton Kutcher 

WEDNESDAY, December 10 
7:30 AM PST - Cory Booker 
10:00 AM PST - JR Hildebrand 
11:00 AM PST - Clara Shih 
12:00 PM PST - Jessica Alba 

THURSDAY, December 11 
5:30 AM PST - Karlie Kloss 
9 AM PST - David Karp 
10 AM PST - Jess Lee 
11 AM PST - Usher 

FRIDAY, December 12 
10:00 AM PST - Hadi Partovi

Watch live Hour of Code chats next week with some pretty awesome people

Tune into the live chats, or watch the video archives:

TUESDAY, December 9 
10:00 AM PST - Lyndsey Scott 
12:00 PM PST - Jack Dorsey 
3:00 PM PST - Ashton Kutcher 

WEDNESDAY, December 10 
7:30 AM PST - Cory Booker 
10:00 AM PST - JR Hildebrand 
11:00 AM PST - Clara Shih 
12:00 PM PST - Jessica Alba 

THURSDAY, December 11 
5:30 AM PST - Karlie Kloss 
9 AM PST - David Karp 
10 AM PST - Jess Lee 
11 AM PST - Usher 

FRIDAY, December 12 
10:00 AM PST - Hadi Partovi

*Recordings of Bill Gates and Sheryl Sandberg chats will be available on our YouTube channel