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Reasons why Parks and Rec deserved an Emmy

- Set in small-town Indiana, still manages to have 40% of it’s ensemble cast be POC, and not one of them is a token either

- 40% of the cast are women. ¾ are POC. All of them are badasses. 

- Every single fucking episode is funny. Seriously. 

- Perd fucking Hapley. I can’t even explain, you just have to watch 

- Pawnee citizens holy hell 

- The flawless political commentary behind the Langman’s and the Male Men 

- The scene in Comeback Kid where Get On Your Feet is playing and they’re all struggling to walk on ice 

- Chris Traeger and his mental illness. They worked it in so that it was comedic, but if it glorified anything, it was asking for help and accepting it. 

- Okay just Chris in general 

- Gary Jerry Larry Terry Gary Gergich Gengurch Gergich 

- Donna, the character who is exactly who she needs to be throughout her life. She acknowledges the need to change her behavior occasionally, but it doesn’t dent her confidence one bit. 

- Ann Meredith Perkins, you beautiful sun-ray nurse. The best friend everyone needs. Quirky and grounded and intelligent. 

- THE FUCKING SAPERSTEINS 

- ESPECIALLY JEAN-RALPHIO 

- Everything Tom Haverford has ever said 

- Ben fucking Wyatt. I can’t even elaborate without crying and combusting. Much better nerd than any weasel from The Big Bang Theory. Feminist. Best Husband Ever. 

- ANYTIME BEN OR LESLIE ARE DRUNK HOLY SHIT 

- Cones of Dunshire and Requiem for a Tuesday 

- FUCKING ICE TOWN 

- April Blart, Mall Cop 

- April’s character development *heart eyes* 

- Andy and April’s love 

- Mouse Rat and hits like The Pit, Catch Your Dream, and - 5000 CANDLES IN THE WIND 

- LIL SEBASTIAN 

- Bert Macklin, FBI 

- Johnny and Johnathan Karate 

- Andy Dwyer, secret genius 

- Ron Swanson, the manliest man to ever man, owner of the world’s best character development, hater of Canada and vegans, beautiful beautiful man 

- Duke fucking Silver 

- I dig your groovy tunes man

- Ben and Leslie’s healthy, realistic, and beautiful relationship 

- Benslie proposal 

- Benslie wedding 

- Ben’s triplets freakout 

- the BOX 

- Amy Poehler plays the most amazing woman to ever grace any screen. Leslie Knope, a socially inept but selfless woman who dedicates her life to public service, her family, and her friends. Deeply flawed main character that wasn’t made lovable by her unfortunate but relatable love of sugar and hatred of vegetables, but instead by her love for others and thoughtfulness and work ethic and optimism. Food habits aside, her character flaws were acknowledged by the writers, her loved ones, and her. No one is an enabler for Leslie Knope’s bad behavior. When she does something shitty, she gets called on it and apologizes. But at the end of the day, hard work and positivity make a difference, and she achieves her dreams. 

- Positivity. The people on this show like each other. They believe in and support each other. They apologize when they’re wrong. They forgive when they’ve been wronged. They go out of their way to make lives better. And it is still funny.

The cast of Parks and Recreation for Entertainment Weekly.

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December 1st 1955: Rosa Parks on the bus

On this day in 1955, Rosa Parks, a 42-year-old black seamstress from Alabama, refused to give up her seat on a bus for a white man. A member of the NAACP, Parks was returning home from a long day at work when the bus driver ordered her to give up her seat on the full bus for a white man. No stranger to civil rights activism, she was subsequently arrested for civil disobedience in defying the state’s Jim Crow racial segregation laws. Through this act of defiance, Parks sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, during which time African-Americans - under the leadership of a young, charismatic reverend called Martin Luther King Jr. - refused to use the city buses, arguing that they should be integrated per the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision. The boycott was successful in forcing Montgomery to end its discriminatory segregation laws, and marked the beginning of the main phase of what is now known as the Civil Rights Movement. From Montgomery, African-Americans across the United States went on to lead sit-ins, freedom rides, and political marches, in an attempt to bring an end to segregation laws which had oppressed their community for so long. These activists were all indebted to Rosa Parks - known as the ‘mother of the Civil Rights Movement’ - for her simple act of defiance, firmly asserting her humanity and her rights as an American citizen. As the movement grew, Parks remained an influential symbol and leader of the movement, which ultimately brought an end to legal segregation and forced Congress to pass the 1964 Civil Rights and 1965 Voting Rights Acts. As for Parks herself, the affair of her arrest and the subsequent boycott caused her to lose her job and made her a victim of harassment and threats. She moved to Detriot and in 1965 began to work in the office of Congressman John Conyers. In 1999, Rosa Parks was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal for her role in transforming American race relations, and upon her death in 2005 she lay in state at the U.S. Capitol. Today, 60 years on, we remember Rosa Parks’s personal bravery, the successes of the movement she inspired, and the steps yet to be taken as the struggle against systemic racism continues.

“People always say that I didn’t give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn’t true. I was not tired physically, or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day…No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in”

60 years ago today

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ACTUAL LONG-SUFFERING SINGLE DAD CHRISTOPHER PIKE