paper graphics

4

tv aesthetic → the office

I’m not superstitious, but… I am a little stitious.
2

and when the lights start flashing like a photobooth
and the stars exploding
we’ll be fireproof

—troye sivan “youth” / © hoshi majoo

It’s time to present on what I’ve been working on the past 5 months. In my final semester I wrote my own Pen-&-Paper-Roleplay “Frostlauf”. Adventurers need a thick coat and even thicker shoes, it’s an arctic fantasy setting with snowy mountains and dark caves to explore! 

It was one hell of a work. World building, writing rules and game mechanics, writing a first campaign, test playing and making the entire book from scratch within 1 ½ months taught me a valuable lesson in time management. It’s far away from being perfect but I am nevertheless happy to have a physical copy of my brain child in my hands.

This book is not even my thesis but rather the foundation for what I’ve been working on the two months after: A concept art book with illustrations for this Pen-&-Paper-Roleplay. I am going to share the pieces with you very soon. 

Lots of stuff happend (of mostly troublesome nature, I really had some bad karma going on) but also some good news: I was accepted for the master degree course and will soon work on exciting subjects with an emphasis on creating information graphics and instructional design stuff for your future learning pleasure. :) 

So! I hope you’ll like what you’ll see very soon and thank you for sticking with me an my art in the past and in the future, I really appreciate your support (and I will always stalk every single reblog for your tags, hah!) You guys are awesome!

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Plates from Vol. 2 of Fantaisies Florales by Jean Pilters, published in the first decade of the 20th century in Jersey City, New Jersey by H.C. Perleberg

Jean Pilters was a little-known French ornamentist. Apart from publishing several pattern books in France and Jersey City, he also contributed to the publication Dekorative Vorbilder published from 1889-1929 in Stuttgart by Julius Hoffmann.

This volume is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Watson Library. These images are my own personal scans of the book.