panthera-pardus

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Paw with reflection by Cloudtail the Snow Leopard
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Amur Leopard Cub by Anne-Marie Kalus
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Young Leopard Washing - Sabi Sands, Greater Kruger, South Africa by Anne-Marie Kalus

Creepypasta #1040: The Anglerfish

Length: Long

I am beautiful in ways men shouldn’t be.

Pretty boy, lovely boy, with his flaxen curls framing a sweet face and big blue eyes with big black lashes. My mother, when she was in our run-down trailer and not at the bar, would say such looks were wasted on a boy and that she wished I was born a girl. I’m certain she wished I had never been born at all.

School was hellish from the start. Girls viewed me as a living doll to play dress-up with, and boys hated me because I made them confused. My third grade teacher once made a comment about my cherry red mouth, the gym coach complimented my porcelain skin. The computer teacher got fired after cornering me alone. I did not understand it – I wore run down charity store clothes, spent most of my time with my nose buried in a book, and barely brushed my hair. And yet, here was the whole school bearing down on me.

Puberty made it worse. All my classmates grew and stretched, flushed with hormones and lust. I grew some, yet no straggly hairs or bright red pimples popped on my china doll face. Instead, the star quarterback would torment me so he could grope at my long legs and graceful hips. My teachers would compliment my academic achievements and then mention that someone like me being so aloof was a shame. The theater teacher asked if I was “interested in boys” in hushed, hopeful whispers.

I was not gay or straight. I was Uninterested. Why would I waste time chasing after shallow and petty girls who were jealous of my appearance? Why would I let one of those testosterone-hopped jocks paw at my body and call me a faggot afterwards? Why would I want my fat, balding English teacher to bend me over for an easy A? They called me frigid, uptight, bitchy, rude, prudish. I wore it with pride all the way to the top of my class.

I left my little Midwest town for a college in the big city. I thought it would be easier there, full of beautiful people to blend into. Towards the end of November, my roommate tried to roofie my water bottle, and the double room became a single room very quickly. For sophomore year, I got a studio apartment on my own.

That fall quarter was beautiful, the trees like brilliant fire throughout campus, and I took a communications class required for my major. It was about giving presentations and speeches, and the school website said Professor O'Malley was to teach it – classmates had described him as a jolly old man, a little longwinded but excellent at teaching discourse and rhetoric.

I sat towards the front, my empty notebook neatly dated, and my classmates chattered all around me. I paid them no heed, eyes casted downwards, but I looked up when the door to the lecture hall opened right before class was to begin. The man who strode in was not Professor O'Malley.

He burnt white hot, reality dimming around his gravity. Everyone seemed so tarnished compared to him, dark-haired bronze-skinned Adonis among the gray and listless dead. Square-jawed and towering, his presence was so thick it was sweltering, smothering, suffocating. My classmates all gasped as his eyes swept across the class.

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Black leopard, Khan by Katie Li
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powtothenuts  asked:

hi, do you have any tips on identifying jaguars from leopards? i know there's several differences ofc but i usually have a hard time telling, personally. also, nice blog !

Thank you! Also, truth be told, you should be easily able to tell them apart from one another in time- even the melanistic ones and the cubs. Either way, jaguars have much rounder heads that are also larger in comparison to the body, much shorter limbs, much smaller ears and eyes and a richer coat colour, with of course the markings being the most well known difference between the two. Jaguars are also much more muscular than leopards are, with a ‘’hill-y’’ back in comparison to the leopard’s curvy one, seeing as how they are ambush predators while leopards are build for the chase.

Here are some pictures to help you along the way:

A jaguar:

A leopard:

A melanistic jaguar:

A melanistic leopard:

A jaguar cub:

A leopard cub:

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Black Panther

A black panther is the melanistic color variant of any Panthera species. Black panthers in Asia and Africa are leopards (Panthera pardus) and black panthers in the Americas are black jaguars (Panthera onca)


Melanism in the jaguar (Panthera onca) is conferred by a dominant allele, and in the leopard (Panthera pardus) by are recessive allele. Close examination of the color of these black cats will show that the typical markings are still present, but are hidden by the excess black pigment melanin, giving an effect similar to that of printed silk. This is called “ghost striping”. Melanistic and non-melanistic animals can be littermates. It is thought that melanism may confer a selective advantage under certain conditions since it is more common in regions of dense forest, where light levels are lower. Recently, preliminary studies also suggest that melanism might be linked to beneficial mutations in the immune system.


The Javan leopard was initially described as being black with dark black spots and silver-grey eyes.

Black leopards are common in the equatorial rainforest of Malaya and the tropical rainforest on the slopes of some African mountains such as Mount Kenya. They are also common in Java, and are reported from densely forested areas in southwestern China, Myanmar, Assam and Nepal, from Travancore and other parts of southern India where they may be more numerous than spotted leopards. One was recorded in the equatorial forest of Cameroon.