pan animates

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Update Again!

Pride Bees Post 1

Row 1 - transgender pride, asexual pride, bisexual pride
Row 2 - rainbow/gay pride, lipstick lesbian pride, lesbian pride
Row 3 - pansexual pride, genderfluid pride, non-binary pride

Pride Bees Post 2—-> here.

The bee with the axe is based on one of the lesbian pride flag designs.  Yes, sometimes TERFs use this flag design, but I have also gotten many messages from lesbians that use the flag and are not TERFs. More about that —->  here.

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op:I have no idea if anyone feels the need for more pride flag colored bees, but here is a few more.

UPDATE: i guess there was a need so MORE BEES.

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Happy Pride!

These designs are available as stickers, coffee mugs, tshirts, and all kinds of other stuff in my shop!

Follow for more pride galaxies and other 8bit space art.

[ace, trans, bisexual, genderflux, genderqueer, demiboy, demigirl, lesbian, rainbow, queer, pansexual, agender]

  • Me: Oh coochie coochie coo, waneenee. Who's a good boy? Who's a good boy, c'mere my smol baby. Awe look at those eyes and those cheeks, such strong teeth. You're a really beautiful color, did you know?
  • Crocodile: *stares intently at me*
2

“I remember hearing Milt Kahl lecture about animation one time, and he said that one of the real challenges for him was animating weightlessness. Animating a character who is sort of floating in mid-air. Not flying, but just sort of floating. It’s details like that that we in the audience are not supposed to think about, of course we shouldn’t. We’re involved in the story.” - Leonard Maltin, film critic and historian

PSA PLEASE READ

Hey everyone! Just wanted to let you guys know, i you have Amazon Prime, you should watch the heck out of an animated series called Danger & Eggs. Its so inclusive! There are casual characters of all races, religions, and even genders. Take for example Milo from the episode Finding Cheryl;TheTrio. They didn’t even mention it or make it a big deal, but Milo used they/them pronouns. Thats a huge deal! And even adding on to that, ilo is a non binary person of color! Like??? Thats so big! And guess what else? The Mayor od their town? A strong, smart, black woman. There even a person of color in a hijab in one episode!! Like just take these screen grabs from an episode:

LOOK AT ALL THE QUEER CHARACTERS. And no, this isn’t even at a pride parade. Look, there’s a trans person, a pan person, someone in a hijab, someone in a rainbow shirt?? THIS SHOW IS AMAZING. Another example is in the episode Morning Routine;The Lost & Found. Phillip is reading off what the rule is when someone doesn’t claim their item from the lost and found. He basically says, if someone doesn’t claim their item, the person in charge of the lost and found could Dispose of it however “he/she/they” deem fit. He used THEY. Guys you need to get people to watch this show, its inclusive, and it doesn’t make all of the queer characters like a plot point?? They’re just there! You have to spread this around, this show hasn’t been renewed for a second season!! We need representation like this in the media! Its and amazon prime original show and its amazing! And on top of all that, it teaches super important lessons to people!! But it needs more people to watch it. It starts Aidy Bryant (from snl) and Eric Knobel. Please please please spread this around! Everyone needs to watch it!! Its free if you just sign up for amazon prime and go watch it!! 

The reasons why I think lions would be great mascots for the LGBT+ community:

  • Their sexual dimorphism is similar to humans so it is easy to project onto them. 
  • Lions have been known to be homosexual, bisexual, asexual, trans and non-binary, which is possibly more variation in sexuality and gender than any other higher animal that isn’t human.
  • Pride
youtube

My animation is out, go check it out, your dickk will be blown out hommie.

Pizza Party Podcast Animated -   Pan is left alone.

@pan-pizza @izzyraeart @hernyart 

Submission: As a queer, nonbinary person and an animal educator, I’ve thought a lot about the issues recently being discussed on this blog and I wanted to share some of that here. I’ve tried to be as calm and clear as possible, but this is an emotional issue for me so it might be a bit emphatic.

Serveral people in this discussion have mentioned already the problems with questioning the existence of bi/pan/trans/ace/aro animals, but not questioning the existance of straight, cis animals. You’ve made passing mentions to this, but I think it’s actually really important to step back and reframe the entire discussion in this context, if you want to be fair and accurate both to the animals and to the people emotionally affected by this issue.

In particular, this passage: “However, the animal science world uses gendered pronouns to denote physical sex in an animal, because that is how efficient and accurate communication about the animal is ensured” raises some massive red flags for me. Yes, it’s important to clearly communicate with your vet about the body parts an animal does and doesn’t have, for ease of treatment. However, pronouns are far from the only way to do this, and definitely not the most efficient. The pronoun “she” doesn’t tell you if a dog is unaltered, spayed, in heat, pregnant, or menopausal - information your vet definitely needs to know.
It’s the work of half a moment to state “my dog is a spayed female” at the start of an appointment, regardless of what pronouns you use after that. In fact, many trans* people have already learned to talk with their doctors in specific terms about their hormone levels and organs they do or don’t have, and cis people need to catch up. Part of the reason this is such an emotional issue for trans people is that the argument, “your doctor needs to know the gender you were assigned at birth! Therefore everyone you meet needs to know, and it should be on your ID, in case you get in an accident and we have to tell the doctor!” is often invoked. (I wish that was an exaggeration. It’s not. This is in spite of the fact that, as a trans* person, knowing the gender you were assigned at birth is more likely to lead to false assumptions about your health and biology than true ones.) So yes, your doctor needs to know about your biology and your vet needs to know about your pet’s, but gender pronouns really aren’t the way to do it.

Outside the vet’s office, insisting on cisgender-equivalent pronouns for your pet leads to a world of problems. I volunteer at an animal shelter, and I see people misinterpret animal’s actions through their percieved, anthropomorphic gender roles constantly. They’re more eager to read aggression from a male animal and affection from a female, which has the potential to lead to massive problems, since both of those behaviors can be dangerous to misinterpret. I would personally argue for the stance that people would be more able to accurately interpret the behavior of animals if we refered to all non-human animals with gender-neutral pronouns, to more accurately reflect the fact that animals do not have gender. Even in social animals that do have sex-differentied social roles, those are completely different from human gender roles and should not be confused with them by the use of human gendered pronouns. If the biological sex of an animal matters in a particular context, you can mention it in that context, rather than applying it all the time as though it was part of their identity.

I do understand that some people find it reassuring to observe that the social roles of biologically male or female animals are different from those of humans, and that they too can be as nurturing as a male penguin or as fierce as a female hyena. So I understand that sometimes people will want to refer to those animals as male or female, in the same way that I want to refer to a cuttlefish as genderfluid because it makes me feel happy and validated. I just want cis people to understand that those interpretations are exactly equivalent.

As for how this perspective affects the emotions of humans impacted by this issue: claiming that gendered pronouns are a form of scientific terminology that accurately reflects the biological sex of an animal is, intentionally or not, supporting the idea that there are biologically and scientifically two genders. It gives fuel to people who try to force that mindset onto humans, and believe me, they use it. I’ve met many people who become enraged if I use the wrong pronouns for their dog, but refuse to respect my identity and pronouns. The attatchment of gendered pronouns to biological sex in non-humans is absolutely reflected back into humans by most of the public, whether that is your intention as an educator or not.

Using gender pronouns as scientific terminology also muddies issues significantly as soon as you leave the field of mammals, where it quickly becomes clear that a male/female dichotomy is far from absolute. Do I use female pronouns for the hermaphroditic flatworm who lost the penis-fencing match and is now carrying eggs? Will those pronouns still apply after the eggs have hatched? What if they win the penis-fencing match next time and contribute sperm instead?
How about a worker bee, who is genetically female but has not developed reproductive organs and plays no reproductive role?
Do I use male pronouns for a fish who was born genetically male, but isn’t able to engage in sexual behavior and fulfill the male sexual role until mating is initiated by the supermale? How about for the supermale, who is genetically female and used to be reproductively female but has since morphed to be reproductively male due to being the largest fish in the school? Is it even accurate to say “genetically female” of a species where both major reproductive roles are carried out by the same genetic category of animals, and those born “biologically” male only reproduce at all by swimming into the middle of the mating dance, ejaculating, and hoping for the best?

A similar issue exists with the assumption that animals are straight. I’ve seen some cringe-worthy anthropomorphization of male/female pairs of animals, including calling them “married,” referring to them as being “in love,” and a lot of analogies to human married-couple behavior, but I’ve never seen this criticized or significantly discussed as an issue of anthropomorphization. But every time I see a post about lesbian birds or trans fish, this issue comes up. I don’t think that animal educators are doing this on purpose, but I do think it is an indicator that many animal educators have not sufficiently deeply challenged the cultural narrative that straight and cis are “normal” but queer and trans* are “debatable” and should be challenged and argued about. 

Science is an ever-changing field, and scientific terminology becomes outdated and is changed as we realize that it reflects our social assumptions more accurately than in reflects reality. The terms we use to discuss sex, gender, pair-bonding, and mating behavior are all deeply intertwined with human social assumptions of cisgender, heterosexual, monogamous life-time bonds that are simultaneously romantic/affectionate and sexual in nature. Scientific communication would be improved by dropping those assumptions and the terminology that comes with them.

I don’t think I have much to add to this - it’s really well thought out and well said - so I’m going to boost it as is as part of the continued discussion. 

Scientific communication would absolutely be improved by changing the terminology to something more accurate. I don’t know if it’s something that would currently be feasible - because of a myriad of things that make attempting that type of change across so many cultures and languages and historical/social contexts difficult - but I definitely support the idea. 

Getting stuck in my Once upon a Time and Descendants phase at the same time might not’ve been the best idea, but oh well. This song just screamed Pan to me, so I really couldn’t help myself. This also might’ve turned out a bit Captain Pan-y, but it’s not like I mind~