palaeontology

Section: “Turning points of the  century”

 

 

LEONARDO DA VINCI

Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci was an  Italian polymath whose areas of interest included invention, painting,  sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering,  literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and  cartography. He has been variously called the father of palaeontology,  ichnology, and architecture, and is widely considered one of the greatest  painters of all time. Sometimes credited with the inventions of the parachute,  helicopter and tank, he epitomised the Renaissance humanist ideal.

Many historians and scholars regard  Leonardo as the prime exemplar of the “Universal Genius” or  "Renaissance Man", an individual of “unquenchable  curiosity” and “feverishly inventive imagination”. According  to art historian Helen Gardner, the scope and depth of his interests were  without precedent in recorded history, and “his mind and personality  seem to us superhuman, while the man himself mysterious and remote”.  Marco Rosci notes that while there is much speculation regarding his life and  personality, his view of the world was logical rather than mysterious, and  that the empirical methods he employed were unorthodox for his time.

Born out of wedlock to a notary, Piero  da Vinci, and a peasant woman, Caterina, in Vinci in the region of Florence,  Leonardo was educated in the studio of the renowned Florentine painter Andrea  del Verrocchio. Much of his earlier working life was spent in the service of  Ludovico il Moro in Milan. He later worked in Rome, Bologna and Venice, and  he spent his last years in France at the home awarded to him by Francis I of  France.

anonymous asked:

ANSWER MY GODDAMN QUESTIONS YOU FUCK YOU KNOW WHO IT IS

FINE
55- I’m only mean when I’m being all dommy to my gf or someone I’m playing with. Otherwise I’m all mushy.
56 - I’ve fist fought a couple of people but only when I used to box.
57 - I’m a scientist so yes, true love is a thing, caused by an exponential increase in oxytocin in response to a specific stimulus.
60 - Yes! I wanna get married and have kids some day but maybe not yet 😂
62 - Palaeontology, all manner of needy things, my friends. That’s what makes me happy.
@skella-whore

aileenaison  asked:

share ten facts about yourself, then send this to your ten favourite followers (❁´◡`❁)*✲゚*

eee~ thank you!


1. I love drawing even tho I find it hard to get motivated lately
2. I have a cat named Loki he’s my best friend
3. I love Fantasia and The Lion King
4. I love dinosaurs and palaeontology
5. I’ve pet an African Serval (they’re real neat)
6. I have a tattoo of a fox
7. I still think charizard is the best and coolest Pokemon
8. I still think Izaya Orihara is cool asf
9. Im not very good at being social or at replies
10. I love my cousin idk where I’d be without her

STETHACANTHUS

Sharks have an extraordinary evolutionary record dating back over 400 million years. They have been an eyewitness to evolution in the seas and still patrol waters all over the globe today. 

Stethacanthus, otherwise known as the ‘ironing board shark’, first appeared around 380 million years ago during the Devonian period and continued to thrive for the next 60 million years. Stethacanthus mostly had an outline similar to modern sharks although they had a distinctive anvil-shaped dorsal fin with small sharp spikes covering the crest. The function of this odd fin is unknown but it is only present in males, so it most likely played a role in courtship and competition. 

Stethacanthus was a reasonable sized shark for its time, yet it was smaller in comparison to most modern sharks being around 70cm to a metre in length. Its size probably restricted its diet to fish, cephalopods and possibly even trilobites that inhabited the reefs. Stethacanthus also had other features uncommon in other sharks, the tail fin was almost symmetrical compared to most other sharks which have a larger upper lobe. They also had distinctive fin whips projecting from the pectoral fins. Once again the function of these fin whips is unknown as they are absent in modern sharks but they likely played a role in mating.
The small stature of this shark may give the impression that it was a agile, deadly swimmer but this is unlikely to be the case. The long fin whips and rough dorsal scales likely hindered streamlined locomotion through the water making them slow-moving.


Stethacathus is not only infamous for its strange morphology, but because a handle of fossils are so brilliantly preserved allowing us to confidently reconstruct the whole animal and even identify its sex. This is a rarity amongst sharks, usually only their teeth survive the tests of time as their bodies are composed mainly of cartilage which is quick to decompose after death.

anonymous asked:

Has work on Palaeos ceased, or is it merely taking its time? Apologies for any inconvenience.

It’s taking its time. I should note that once in a while, besides other preoccupations in life, some tasks take precedence as not attending to them impinges on my ability to do work for Palaeos.

Also my own apologies for the late reply, but as hinted at in the above linked post, Tumblr and my slow connection don’t deal well with each other.

  • Natsu: I JUST REALIZED WE DON’T EVEN KNOW WHAT DINOSAURS SOUND LIKE! THEY COULD’VE BEEN SPEAKING FLUENT GERMAN FOR ALL WE KNOW
  • Lucy: it’s too early for this shit
  • Natsu: GUTEN MORGEN HERR PTERODACTYL
  • Happy: WIE GEHTS FRAU MASTADON
  • Gray: Oh my god neither of those are dinosaurs and there’s 145 million years separating them both, this conversation is a palaeontological disaster
vimeo

(EXCERPT) shifting powers (scale), 2016
sarah züst, zürich ch
lecture performance, 10′
palaeontology museum, zürich ch



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