pair bond

That thing about how cats think humans are big kittens is a myth, y’know.

It’s basically born of false assumptions; folks were trying to explain how a naturally solitary animal could form such complex social bonds with humans, and the explanation they settled on is “it’s a displaced parent/child bond”.

The trouble is, cats aren’t naturally solitary. We just assumed they were based on observations of European wildcats - but housecats aren’t descended from European wildcats. They’re descended from African wildcats, which are known to hunt in bonded pairs and family groupings, and that social tendency is even stronger in their domesticated relatives. The natural social unit of the housecat is a colony: a loose affiliation of cats centred around a shared territory held by alliance of dominant females, who raise all of the colony’s kittens communally.

It’s often remarked that dogs understand that humans are different, while cats just think humans are big, clumsy cats, and that’s totally true - but they regard us as adult colonymates, not as kittens, and all of their social behaviour toward us makes a lot more sense through that lens.

They like to cuddle because communal grooming is how cats bond with colonymates - it establishes a shared scent-identity for the colony and helps clean spots that they can’t easily reach on their own.

They bring us dead animals because cats transport surplus kills back to the colony’s shared territory for consumption by pregnant, nursing, or sick colonymates who can’t easily hunt on their own. Indeed, that’s why they kill so much more than they individually need - it’s not for fun, but to generate enough surplus kills to sustain the colony’s non-hunting members.

They’re okay with us messing with their kittens because communal parenting is the norm in a colony setting, and us being colonymates in their minds automatically makes us co-parents.

It’s even why many cats are so much more tolerant toward very small children, as long as those children are related to one of their regular humans: they can tell the difference between human adults and human “kittens”, and your kittens are their kittens.

Basically, you’re going to have a much easier time getting a handle on why your cat does why your cat does if you remember that the natural mode of social organisation for cats is not as isolated solitary hunters, but as a big communal catpile - and for that purpose, you count as a cat.

When people say all straight pairings are boring and forced as hell, then this means they obviously have never watched FMA Brotherhood to witness one of the most beautiful and most perfect ships ever:

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Can we talk about the concept of humans adopting other sentient aliens as equal members of their families?

Like, in the posts I’ve seen so far, there’s mostly talks of humans adopting dangerous alien critters as pets but what about humans adopting sentient aliens?

“Human-George, just leave that be, they’re just a runt.” - “… No.” - “Human-George, you can’t - put them down! What are you doing?” - “Krlunk, I’m not leaving a child behind on this forsaken moon to die.” - “But they’re just a runt, not worth raising. The broodbirther and the feeders must have left it behind when they migrated 5 sols ago.” - “Are they going to come back?” - “No, Human-George, Twargs migrate for long periods of time, and we can’t spare the time to go after them.” - “Then I’ll take them with me.” “- “What?” - “I’ll take this little champion here with me and I will raise them as my own.” - “You- you can’t just do that! You can’t just spill your pack-bonding instincts- Human George!!! Get back here!” - “Don’t listen to Krlunk, kid, I won’t leave you here alone. Doesn’t matter how many appendages you have. You hungry? Thought so, let’s go get you some grub.” - (in the distance) “Human-George! The extra rations are coming out of your pay!!!” - “See if I care, Krlunk. Go eat paperwork or so.”

Imagine human patchwork families with little aliens raised and loved alonside their own, imagine some human trying to explain to crewmates how they have a Twarg sibling and a Sh’ilean sister even though their parents look very much human, imagine humans parents trying their very best to provide their alien child with the best possible care.

Also imagine it the other way around. Humans getting adopted by aliens and bonding with them just as much as they would with their own kind, either through deeds or just love. Humans building their own families in a wild mix of colours and number of appendages or eyes.

“So this is my human side of the family, see, these are my human parents.” - “Is that your larval form in their arms, Hooman-Cassandra?” - “Sort of, yeah, and this is my Gran’hroo mother and all of her children.” - “How can you have a Gran’hoo relative? I thought your kind could only come from a bonded pair of hoomans?” - “Oh, I used to live on the same mining colony as her when I was a child and I’d play with her children, spent most of my days in their house and one day I called her ‘Acraï’ - ‘mother’ in Gran’hoo language - by accident. It kind of stuck. She took me in when my parents temporarily left for another space station and I wanted to finish my education where I’d started it. When I left for my first space journey, she gave a clan insignia and called me her daughter so yeah… this is my Mom, my Dad, and my Acraï and they’re all my parents.”

anonymous asked:

Why are birds so amazing?

This is a tough question, and a very big question. Since it’s just about impossible to objectively explain why birds are amazing (they are, btw), maybe I can explain why birds amaze me and why they’re the focus of both my career and a significant portion of my recreational time.

1. Birds are dinosaurs that you can hold today.

Flashback to 2010, a time when little Redstart was thinking about applying to college. For a while I was convinced I would pursue animation and go be some awesome art director of nifty animated films starring animals. Then I realized that a) I wasn’t good enough or motivated enough to make it, and b) having art as a career would ruin creating art for me. So, then it was back to my other passion: paleontology.

I literally applied to college planning to be a geology/biology double major with a long-term career goal of being a professor of paleobiology. I doggedly pursued this game until my sophomore year of college, when I discovered birds.

Birds are dinosaurs. Just about everyone knows this now (thank goodness). The big, significant realization here is that you can study dinosaurs today. Think about the magnificent breadth and depth of scientific questions you can ask about an animal when it’s right in front of you, instead of turned into rock and shattered into a million fragments! Don’t get me wrong; paleontology is an awesome field. But instead of dedicating my life to recreating the world of millions of years ago, I decided to work on unraveling the mysteries of today’s dinosaurs.

2. Birds are Pokémon.

Stay with me, now! As a wee youth I was obsessed with Pokémon. Wait, I’m still obsessed with Pokémon. Well, it turns out that birding and bird banding are just about the closest thing you can get in real life to filling out the Pokédex.

Birds have the Goldilocks number of species, which makes them incredibly appealing to pursue, study, identify, and watch. Think about it! Mammals, while are certainly *~*~*charismatic*~*~*, are mostly nocturnal. There are also like 10 of them in the world (yes, that’s an undersell). Lame! Insects and other invertebrates are amazing, but there are too goddamn many for many laypeople to really get into (side note: my alternate field would probably be malacology because I love Mollusca). Fish have some good numbers and variety, but require getting into this whole aquatic sphere– a different world entirely and one that is not readily accessible to those of us who matured in NYC.

So there’s the numbers game and their incredible charisma at play here. Humans have trained their companion psittacids and cacatuids to speak, to understand; as intelligent social animals, we can feel a mysterious connection with birds in the same way that most humans feel an inherent connection with your typical charismatic megafauna, such as wolves and lions (*eyeroll*).

3. Birds are diverse.

Cassowaries are three-toed behemoths that can communicate in rumbling infrasound like elephants and kick a grown man to death. Woodcocks can see in 360 degrees without a single turn of the head. The booted racket-tail is a hummingbird about the size of a quarter with a tail three times its body length that goes torpid every night after its daily frenzy of foraging for nectar. The Chiroxiphia manakins coordinate sexual display in an incredible show of teamwork, after which only one male gets to mate. The bowerbirds build ornate structures that rival some human creations, and then dance and sing in front of them for a mate.

Albatross can maintain a pair bond for decades, and once their chicks fledge they may not touch solid ground for three years. Steller’s eiders from both North America and Russia winter together on the sea ice of the Bering Strait, where they fish for molluscs in the cold. Bar-headed geese fly over the Himalayas. Arctic terns breed as far north as the Arctic circle and winter all the way south in Antarctica, in the longest migration known to the animal kingdom. Martial eagles kill and eat small antelope by flying them up high and dropping them to the ground. Starlings and mimids can imitate hundreds of sounds. Numerous seabirds can go their entire life without a single drink of freshwater due to their advanced salt glands. 

…And so on. The breadth of the bird world is absolutely incredible. With roughly 10,000 species worldwide existing on every continent (something that cannot be boasted by many other taxonomic classes), birds have evolved to occupy so many amazing niches.

4. Birds matter.

Now, this isn’t to imply that other animals don’t matter! It is incredibly vital that we keep a steady stream of funding to all biological sciences,  but I must say that in my work with birds I have always felt that the research I’ve been doing plays its part in the greater scheme of things.

Birds are an easily seen indicator species; their high sensitivity can be informative about how the world at large is doing. As climate changes and anthropogenic disturbance increases, we can see bird populations shifting their range and phenology from year to year.

Since they are so prominent, birds have also been among the numerous species to face untimely extinction; take the story of the magnificent great auk, for example, which was rapidly hunted into oblivion due to its flightlessness and colonial breeding strategy. Carolina parakeet, passenger pigeon, Bachman’s warbler, ivory-billed woodpecker, Labrador duck: these are all species that used to be seen in North America that are nowhere to be found today. 

And it’s through some well-timed intervention spear-headed by biologists and conservationists that we have avoided the loss of other amazing bird species. The National Audubon Society keeps an egret in their logo, a nod to the birds that were almost destroyed in the hat trade. The Atlantic Puffin was completely extirpated from the Gulf of Maine until it was successfully reintroduced on Eastern Egg Rock. And remember the shitshow that was DDT? It was birds that let us know how much of a threat that pesticide was; brown pelicans, bald eagles, peregrine falcons, osprey, and more faced steep declines thanks to the substance.

These reasons just brush the surface of why birds are amazing– and yes, why I am constantly amazed by birds even though I look at them every day in my backyard or as part of my work. We haven’t even mentioned feathers, or vocalizationtheir incredible physiology, or the way they have inspired artists for centuries.

Getting into birds literally changed my life; it was a turning point for my career, for my mental health, and for my outlook on this incredible world that we live in. I want others to have similar realizations about the natural world! That’s why I run this blog, and that’s why I’ll never stop birding.

Submission: As a queer, nonbinary person and an animal educator, I’ve thought a lot about the issues recently being discussed on this blog and I wanted to share some of that here. I’ve tried to be as calm and clear as possible, but this is an emotional issue for me so it might be a bit emphatic.

Serveral people in this discussion have mentioned already the problems with questioning the existence of bi/pan/trans/ace/aro animals, but not questioning the existance of straight, cis animals. You’ve made passing mentions to this, but I think it’s actually really important to step back and reframe the entire discussion in this context, if you want to be fair and accurate both to the animals and to the people emotionally affected by this issue.

In particular, this passage: “However, the animal science world uses gendered pronouns to denote physical sex in an animal, because that is how efficient and accurate communication about the animal is ensured” raises some massive red flags for me. Yes, it’s important to clearly communicate with your vet about the body parts an animal does and doesn’t have, for ease of treatment. However, pronouns are far from the only way to do this, and definitely not the most efficient. The pronoun “she” doesn’t tell you if a dog is unaltered, spayed, in heat, pregnant, or menopausal - information your vet definitely needs to know.
It’s the work of half a moment to state “my dog is a spayed female” at the start of an appointment, regardless of what pronouns you use after that. In fact, many trans* people have already learned to talk with their doctors in specific terms about their hormone levels and organs they do or don’t have, and cis people need to catch up. Part of the reason this is such an emotional issue for trans people is that the argument, “your doctor needs to know the gender you were assigned at birth! Therefore everyone you meet needs to know, and it should be on your ID, in case you get in an accident and we have to tell the doctor!” is often invoked. (I wish that was an exaggeration. It’s not. This is in spite of the fact that, as a trans* person, knowing the gender you were assigned at birth is more likely to lead to false assumptions about your health and biology than true ones.) So yes, your doctor needs to know about your biology and your vet needs to know about your pet’s, but gender pronouns really aren’t the way to do it.

Outside the vet’s office, insisting on cisgender-equivalent pronouns for your pet leads to a world of problems. I volunteer at an animal shelter, and I see people misinterpret animal’s actions through their percieved, anthropomorphic gender roles constantly. They’re more eager to read aggression from a male animal and affection from a female, which has the potential to lead to massive problems, since both of those behaviors can be dangerous to misinterpret. I would personally argue for the stance that people would be more able to accurately interpret the behavior of animals if we refered to all non-human animals with gender-neutral pronouns, to more accurately reflect the fact that animals do not have gender. Even in social animals that do have sex-differentied social roles, those are completely different from human gender roles and should not be confused with them by the use of human gendered pronouns. If the biological sex of an animal matters in a particular context, you can mention it in that context, rather than applying it all the time as though it was part of their identity.

I do understand that some people find it reassuring to observe that the social roles of biologically male or female animals are different from those of humans, and that they too can be as nurturing as a male penguin or as fierce as a female hyena. So I understand that sometimes people will want to refer to those animals as male or female, in the same way that I want to refer to a cuttlefish as genderfluid because it makes me feel happy and validated. I just want cis people to understand that those interpretations are exactly equivalent.

As for how this perspective affects the emotions of humans impacted by this issue: claiming that gendered pronouns are a form of scientific terminology that accurately reflects the biological sex of an animal is, intentionally or not, supporting the idea that there are biologically and scientifically two genders. It gives fuel to people who try to force that mindset onto humans, and believe me, they use it. I’ve met many people who become enraged if I use the wrong pronouns for their dog, but refuse to respect my identity and pronouns. The attatchment of gendered pronouns to biological sex in non-humans is absolutely reflected back into humans by most of the public, whether that is your intention as an educator or not.

Using gender pronouns as scientific terminology also muddies issues significantly as soon as you leave the field of mammals, where it quickly becomes clear that a male/female dichotomy is far from absolute. Do I use female pronouns for the hermaphroditic flatworm who lost the penis-fencing match and is now carrying eggs? Will those pronouns still apply after the eggs have hatched? What if they win the penis-fencing match next time and contribute sperm instead?
How about a worker bee, who is genetically female but has not developed reproductive organs and plays no reproductive role?
Do I use male pronouns for a fish who was born genetically male, but isn’t able to engage in sexual behavior and fulfill the male sexual role until mating is initiated by the supermale? How about for the supermale, who is genetically female and used to be reproductively female but has since morphed to be reproductively male due to being the largest fish in the school? Is it even accurate to say “genetically female” of a species where both major reproductive roles are carried out by the same genetic category of animals, and those born “biologically” male only reproduce at all by swimming into the middle of the mating dance, ejaculating, and hoping for the best?

A similar issue exists with the assumption that animals are straight. I’ve seen some cringe-worthy anthropomorphization of male/female pairs of animals, including calling them “married,” referring to them as being “in love,” and a lot of analogies to human married-couple behavior, but I’ve never seen this criticized or significantly discussed as an issue of anthropomorphization. But every time I see a post about lesbian birds or trans fish, this issue comes up. I don’t think that animal educators are doing this on purpose, but I do think it is an indicator that many animal educators have not sufficiently deeply challenged the cultural narrative that straight and cis are “normal” but queer and trans* are “debatable” and should be challenged and argued about. 

Science is an ever-changing field, and scientific terminology becomes outdated and is changed as we realize that it reflects our social assumptions more accurately than in reflects reality. The terms we use to discuss sex, gender, pair-bonding, and mating behavior are all deeply intertwined with human social assumptions of cisgender, heterosexual, monogamous life-time bonds that are simultaneously romantic/affectionate and sexual in nature. Scientific communication would be improved by dropping those assumptions and the terminology that comes with them.

I don’t think I have much to add to this - it’s really well thought out and well said - so I’m going to boost it as is as part of the continued discussion. 

Scientific communication would absolutely be improved by changing the terminology to something more accurate. I don’t know if it’s something that would currently be feasible - because of a myriad of things that make attempting that type of change across so many cultures and languages and historical/social contexts difficult - but I definitely support the idea. 

my brain - the reason that Keith/Lance always stand so close together is because they’re in voltron formation and thats the shows brand, alongside the fact that they’re usually partners because they’re the right side of Voltron 

the same goes for Shiro/Allura often being paired off together in offical works and promos because they’re supposed to be the responsible leaders of the team and often work off one another

my heart - the aliens wanna stand with their boyfriends lmaooooo 

When new people visit Jim and Spock’s apartment they assume all the pets are Jim’s doing. They are dead wrong.

The first cat happened because Spock came across a stray kitten on his way home from work.

The second cat happened because Spock passed a shelter that was shutting down and it took a bit more convincing before Jim accepted it.

The third cat happened because Spock started volunteering at a shelter and this grouchy old cat had been there for a while and it took a lot more convincing but Jim just can’t say no to his husband.

The two dogs happened because Jim visited Spock while he was working at the shelter and met a bonded pair of yorkie mixes that he couldn’t leave behind.

Karmic Synastry

Okay so those of you that have been following me for a long time know that compatibility is my least favourite part of astrology, but I do happen to love karmic astrology so I made some kind of a compromise, you’re welcome.

*Not strictly romantic synastry, can be interpreted platonically. 

Outer planets forming relationships with inner planets in synastry are known to be karmic ties between the souls of the two people. It’s common for the two to have some kind of conflict or tension until the karma is settled.

Saturn in synastry

  • Saturn in general is known to be a karmic planet, as it shows us where we need to work on ourselves in this life. He is the great teacher and will present us with lessons that are based on our previous experiences. 
  • When Saturn comes into contact with personal planets in synastry, there is often a debt to be repaid from the previous life, the planet person being indebted to the Saturn person. 
  • The nature of the planet that is aspect will be the nature of the debt to be repaid.The houses that the Saturn and personal planet fall into will indicate the areas of life that need to be focused on when settling this debt.

Uranus in synastry

  • Uranus in synastry will show a karmic relationship between two people regarding the pull and push between independence and dependency.
  • When Uranus comes into contact with a personal planet, the planet person will feel dependent on the Uranus person in some way or another (the nature of the dependency will depend on the planet)
  • The Uranus person, who in a past life may have been left dependent on this person, will seek freedom and independence in this life.
  • There will be a push and pull relationship here that may seem chaotic until a balance is found and the karma is settled

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Crash

@talortut​ asked:  Hi! I love your blog <3 If you’re still taking requests, I would love to see some sick/hurt/exhausted/whatever Lance with the line “You’re gonna crash" from the starters. :)

((Thank you for the prompt SOMEHOW THIS TURNED INTO A 2400K LANGST/ KLANCE FIC BUT LMAO))

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Moonlight

Pairings: Alpha!Werewolf!Sam x Omega!Werewolf!Reader

Word Count: 3500+

Summary: You’re a bonded pair with three children and all Sam can think about is having more.

My twist on a/b/o dynamics. There’s a little fluff in here too, I swear it.

Kink Prompts: Mating/Breeding & Were-animal sex

Warnings: Breastfeeding(non-sexual, baby related), knotting, dominance, claiming, fingering, oral, unprotected sex (obvi), biting, dirty talk, rough sex, some dom/sub overtones.

A/N: Written for @impalaimagining‘s Smut-entine’s Day Challenge


Sam comes home late, just after two in the morning, shutting the front door carefully, cautious of waking you or his children. He’s a sore, bleeding and a little drunk but it’s been a good night.

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inkdropfox  asked:

As a trans guy who works in zoos and very much enjoys your blog, I might have to disagree with your current discussion just a little? While it IS very important to separate gender/sex and animals/humans, I think it's important to let the LGBT community find solace in animals displaying LGBT-representational behavior. Especially when many anti-LGBT people use the excuse "it's not natural" or "you have a disorder", it's very nice to be able to point to animals as "examples" or for our comfort?

(This ask is in response to this post on if animals can be bi). I’ve taken forever responding to this because I wanted to sit down with a trans friend who does activism/education on LGBT issues and hash out a) am I being shitty about this and b) if no, how do I actually say what I mean because getting myself out of science lingo when things cross over into social issues is something I struggle with. 

(I am very specifically not addressing trans/intersex animals in this post. I need to do more research and chat with people about that topic to get the wording correct first).

You’re absolutely right. It’s really important to say yes, in nature, there are animals that have sex / pair bond with / go through courtship behavior with animals of the same sex, or both sexes, or are uninterested in sex. This is absolutely a thing that occurs in nature, and while there are some species for which this is not species-typical behavior there are also species in which it is totally inherent in the normal behavioral repertoire. In terms of representation, yeah, it exists all over the animal kingdom and that’s absolutely worth acknowledging. 

I feel like there’s an important differentiation, though, between talking about is  ‘this animal’s existence is similar to / analogous to mine’ and projecting a human experience of that state of existence onto those animals. That’s where discussions about bi/gay animals start getting frustrating for me, as someone whose goal as an educator is to teach accurate behavioral science and remove anthropomorphism from how people think about animals. 

The really important parts of how people experience identity or how society reacts to someone’s identity (sexual attraction, isolation for not being heteronormative, for example) are too fundamentally tied up in being human to be correct for other taxa. We don’t know if animals have a sense of gender, or if they experience sexual attraction to conspecifics in any way other than an instinctual preference for specific indicators of fertility and quality, and I don’t think I’ve ever heard of an animal that was treated any differently by conspecifics as a result of who it tried to have sex with. When we assume animals experience being bi/gay/ace the way humans do, we basically invalidate all the ways their species-specific experiences and internal states would affect how they perceive and interact with the world. 

Tl;dr, bi/gay/ace animals definitely exist in a social/behavioral sense, but it’s really important to not assume that they have the same experience as a bi/gay/ace human. 

What do you do when you’re a pair of young cats, who have been waiting to be adopted since you were young kittens? Every day you stare at the door, hoping against hope that some special person will walk in and love you forever.

Shelter Pet Project peeps: YOUR reblogs can make it happen!

We’re brothers Lance and JC, and we recently turned one. We’ve been waiting for homes at East Lake Pet Orphanage (ELPO) in Dallas almost our entire lives.

Our friends here say we’re so snuggly and calming with each other, we should be adopted together.

Lance, he’s shy. An introvert’s cat. Because really, who needs a party-all-night guy anyway? He appreciates a soft word, a slow hand, then he’s your everything.

JC’s more outgoing, prancing around the room to say hello to the other kitties before settling into a spot to watch the action. He does find a good chin scratch irresistible, though.

Speaking of irresistible, if you want to know more or set up a meeting, call 214-342-3100 or email elpo@welovepets.net!

Love,

Lance and JC
#StartAStoryAdopt

A History of Violence

Alpha!Werewolf!Sam x Omega!Werewolf!Reader - A/B/O

(part one of two)

Summary: You and Sam are a bonded pair with four children. You’re both interrogated by the police who are convinced that Sam and Dean are running a criminal enterprise.

This falls into the same AU as The Brown Bottle, Moonlight and The Derby

Warnings: Language, violence, murder, dom/sub overtones. mentions of: knotting, breeding, claiming, giving birth

Words: 3800+

Beta: The always wonderful @saxxxology

Your name: submit What is this?



The Raid

It’s just after one in the afternoon and you’re cutting the crust from a peanut butter sandwich. “Liam, you want jelly on yours?”

You son looks up from up his sea of building blocks with a grimace on his face. “No!”

“Alright, no jelly,” you confirm. His cheeks are pink, hair stuck to his forehead. The air conditioning broke two days ago and Sam promised to have one of his guys come by to look at it by tonight. “You look hot buddy, why don’t you come in here.”

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In case someone still doesn’t get it:

headcanon ≠ canon

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A History of Violence - Part Two (completed)

Alpha!Werewolf!Sam x Omega!Werewolf!Reader - A/B/O

Part One Here

Summary: You and Sam are a bonded pair with four children. You’re both interrogated by the police who are convinced that Sam and Dean are running a criminal enterprise.

This falls into the same AU as The Brown Bottle, Moonlight and The Derby

Warnings: Language, violence, dom/sub overtones. mentions of: knotting, breeding, claiming, giving birth, assault, mention of rape

Words: 4600+

Betas: @saxxxology & @moonlitskinwalker

Your name: submit What is this?


Interrogation: Sam


Sam sits on a tiny chair in a small room, wrists in handcuffs resting on the table in front of him. He’s been waiting for the better part of three hours without so much as a hello from anyone. He’s got a pretty good idea of what’s happening, at least the basics. He can’t say he wasn’t expecting to be brought in for questioning, he was, however, unprepared for the SWAT team knocking down the door to the mobile office at their construction site.

He takes a deep breath, running his hands through his hair. While he’s not new to being on this side of the law, he’s never been left to sweat in the box for this long.

He gets it, they’re proving a point.

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My two domesticated clowns, Bonne-Chance and Pigeon. They’re a domestic bonded pair!

Bonne-Chance: Male Whiteface, Purebred French Pierrot. He’s not exactly show-quality because of the off-coloring stockings, but he’s still classically trained in pantomime and very healthy, with lovely markings and a pleasingly complex personality. Make sure to properly research geneology with purebred clowns. I sourced Bonne-Chance responsibly. Pierrots are usually very well-behaved, and Bonne-Chance is a particularly sweet one that doesn’t lose himself in the stereotypical bouts of Pierrot melancholy.

Pigeon: Male mutt, mixed wildtype European Tramp and American Landrace Circus/Rodeo Auguste cross. Messy markings, but he’s talented at stunts, mimicry, tricks and pranks, and a very skilled buffoon. And he was a rescue! He adapted well with no behavioral issues, very endearing and sweet- anyone who says adopted shelter clowns can’t adjust to a home life is wrong. Pigeon tends towards very upbeat play and keeps from being too rowdy, but sometimes shows some distinct Sad Clown display, which is normal and healthy as long as it isn’t too excessive.