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french news vocabulary 🇫🇷
  • à la une   on the front page
  • les achats de précaution   panic buying
  • l'actualité, les actualités   news
  • affolé (adj)   panic-stricken
  • allégué (adj)   alleged
  • un appel   appeal, call
  • une arme   weapon, gun
  • une arme blanche   knife
  • les armes de destruction weapons of mass destruction
  • assassiner   to murder
  • un assaut attack
    un attentat   attack
  • un attentat-suicide   suicide bombing
  • l'avortement   abortion
  • la banlieue   suburb
  • un bilan   death toll
  • blanchir exonerate
  • blessé (adj)   injured, wounded
  • une bombe   bomb
  • un bouchon traffic jam
  • braquer to hold up, point a gun at
  • la canicule   heat wave
  • un cas de force majeure   disaster (natural or man-made)
  • les Casques bleus   UN peacekeeping forces
  • un casseur   rioter
  • une catastrophe aérienne   air disaster
  • une catastrophe écologique   environmental disaster
  • une catastrophe naturelle   natural disaster
  • censurer to censure
  • un cessez-le-feu   cease-fire
  • un cible - target
  • le chômage   unemployment
  • un collecte au profit des sinistrés   disaster fund
  • coupable guilty
  • un coup d'état   overthrow
  • une coupure de courant   power outage
  • le crime   crime
  • un criminel, une criminelle   criminal
  • une crise   crisis
  • un cyclone   cyclone, hurricane
  • se déclarer - to break out (eg. a fire) 
  • déclencher to launch 
  • décréter to declare 
  • des dégâts   damage
  • le deuil   bereavement, mourning
  • un désastre financier   financial disaster
  • un désastre politique   political disaster
  • les drogues (fem)   drugs
  • un éboulement   rockslide
  • une élection   election
  • une émeute   riot
  • une enquête   investigation
  • une épidémie   epidemic
  • extrader   to extradite
  • un feu   fire
  • un flic (informal)   cop
  • flotter le drapeau en berne to fly flag at half mast
  • la garde à vue   police custody
  • être mis/placé en garde à vue   to be kept in custody, held for questioning
  • le gaz lacrymogène   tear gas
  • un glissement de terrain   landslide
  • une grève (faire la grève)   strike (to be on strike)
  • la guerre   war
  • la grippe aviaire   bird flu
  • la grippe porcine   swine flu
  • hexagonal   French
  • l'Hexagone   France
  • un immigrant, un immigré   immigrant
  • les impôts (masc)   taxes
  • un incendie   fire
  • une inondation   flood
  • inonder   to flood
  • un insurgé   insurgent
  • des intempéries   bad weather
  • IVG   abortion 
  • le kamikaze   suicide bomber
  • la loi   law
  • la lutte (literal/figurative)   struggle, fight
  • une manifestation   demonstration
  • le meurtre   murder
  • la mondialisation   globalization
  • une navette spatiale   space shuttle
  • un obus   explosive shell
  • opération escargot   rolling blockade
  • un ouragan   hurricane
  • une panne d'électricité   blackout, power cut
  • la peine de mort   death penalty
  • la pénurie   shortage, lack
  • la police   police
  • un policier   police officer
  • la politique   politics, policy
  • le politique   politician
  • poursuivre en justice   to sue
  • le pouvoir d'achat   buying power
  • présumé (adj)   alleged
  • un procès   trial
  • le réchauffement de la planète   global warming
  • la région sinistrée   disaster area
  • une réplique   after-shock, counter-attack
  • la retraite   retirement
  • un scrutin   ballot, election
  • un séisme   earthquake, upheaval
  • selon (prep)   according to
  • un sinistré, une sinistrée   disaster victim
  • un soldat   soldier
  • un sommaire summary
  • un sondage   poll
  • soupçonner to suspect
  • le suicide assisté   assisted suicide
  • les suites aftermath
  • un syndicat   union
  • le système de santé publique   health care system
  • un témoin   witness
  • une tempête   storm
  • le terrorisme   terrorism
  • tirer (sur)   to shoot (at)
  • les titres   headlines, headline news
  • une tornade   tornado
  • les transports en commun   public transit
  • un tremblement de terre   earthquake
  • une trêve   truce
  • tuer   to kill
  • un vaccin   vaccine
  • une victime   victim  (Note that this word is always feminine, even when referring to a man)
  • viser  to target
  • voter   to vote
Bowie’s Top 100

The legend, David Bowie, passed away at the age of 69 after an eighteen-month battle with cancer. He will be greatly missed. To celebrate his life, listed below are his top 100 books. 

-Interviews with Francis Bacon by David Sylvester

-Billy Liar by Keith Waterhouse

-Room At The Top by John Braine

-On Having No Head by Douglas Harding

-Kafka Was The Rage by Anatole Broyard

-A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

-City of Night by John Rechy

-The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz

-Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

-Iliad by Homer

-As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

-Tadanori Yokoo by Tadanori Yokoo

-Berlin Alexanderplatz by Alfred Döblin

-Inside The Whale And Other Essays by George Orwell

-Mr. Norris Changes Trains by Christopher Isherwood

-Halls Dictionary of Subjects And Symbols In Art by James A. Hall

-David Bomberg by Richard Cork

-Blast by Wyndham Lewis

-Passing by Nella Larson

-Beyond The Brillo Box by Arthur C. Danto

-The Origin of Consciousness In The Breakdown Of The Bicameral Mind by Julian Jaynes

-In Bluebird’s Castle by George Steiner

-Hawksmoor by Peter Ackroyd

-The Divided Self by R.D. Laing

-The Stranger by Albert Camus

-Infants Of The Spring by Wallace Thurman

-The Quest For Christa T by Christa Wolf

-The Songlines by Bruce Chatwin

-Nights At The Circus by Angela Carter

-The Master And Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov

-The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark

-Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

-Herzog by Saul Bellow

-Puckoon by Spike Milligan

-Black Boy by Richard Wright

-The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald

-The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With The Sea by Yukio Mishima

-Darkness At Noon by Arthur Koestler

-The Waste Land by T.S. Elliot

-McTeague by Frank Norris

-Money by Martin Amis

-The Outsider by Colin Wilson

-Strange People by Frank Edwards

-English Journey by J.B. Priestley

-A Confederacy Of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole

-The Day Of The Locust by Nathanael West

-1984 by George Orwell

-The Life And Times Of Little Richard by Charles White

-Aopbopaloobop Alopbamboom: The Golden Age of Rock by Nik Cohn

-Mystery Train by Greil Marcus

-Beano (comics, 1950s)

-Raw (comics, 1980s)

-White Noise by Don DeLillo

-Sweat Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom by Peter Guralnick

-Silence: Lectures and Writing by John Cage

-Writers At Work: The Paris Review Interviews edited by Malcolm Cowley

-The Sound of the City: The Rise of Rock and Roll by Charlie Gillete

-Octobriana and the Russian Underground by Peter Sadecky

-The Street by Ann Petry

-Wonder Boys by Michael Chabon

-Last Exit to Brooklyn by Hubert Selby, Jr.

-A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn

-The Age of American Unreason by Susan Jacoby

-Metropolitan Life by Fran Lebowitz

-The Coast of Utopia by Tom Stoppard

-The Bridge by Hart Crane

-All The Emperor’s Horses by David Kidd

-Fingersmith by Sarah Waters

-Earthly Powers by Anthony Burgess

-The 42nd Parallel by John Dos Passos

-Tales of Beatnik Glory by Ed Saunders

-The Bird Artist by Howard Norman

-Nowhere To Run: The Story of Soul Music by Gerri Hirshey

-Before the Deluge by Otto Friedrich

-Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence From Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson by Camille Paglia

-The American Way of Death by Jessica Mitford

-In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

-Lady Chatterly’s Lover by D.H. Lawrence

-Teenage by Jon Savage

-Vile Bodies by Evelyn Waugh

-The Hidden Persuaders by Vance Packard

-The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin

-Viz (comics, early 1980s)

-Private Eye (satirical magazine, 1960s-1980s)

-Selected Poems by Frank O’Hara

-The Trial of Henry Kissinger by Christopher Hitchens

-Flaubert’s Parrot by Julian Barnes

-Maldodor by Comte de Lautréamont

-On The Road by Jack Kerouac

-Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonders by Lawrence Weschler

-Zanoni by Edward Bulwer-Lytton

-Transcendental Magic, Its Doctrine and Ritual by Eliphas Lévi

-The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels

-The Leopard by Giusseppe Di Lampedusa

-Inferno by Dante Alighieri

-A Grave For A Dolphin by Alberto Denti di Pirajno

-The Insult by Rupert Thomson

-In Between The Sheets by Ian McEwan

-A People’s Tragedy by Orlando Figes

-Journey Into The Whirlwind by Eugenia Ginzburg


“The truth is of course is that there is no journey. We are arriving and departing all at the same time.” -David Bowie

anonymous asked:

The issue with discussing editing the Bible is rather ironic because that's exactly what the Council of Nicea did when they created the Bible canon! They decide which books were 'divinely inspired' and what was not. Manuscripts of the Gospels have shown to be altered and in some cases forged. How does one decide what book is from God? Is Apocrypha considered too? What about Gnostic texts? Looking into how the Bible came to be really is fascinating. There was clearly never a 'one true version'.

There’s this myth in Christianity that a sqaud of dudes got together in a darkened room and made isolated executive decisions about which books to canonize, but the choices made at Nicea were motivated much more by which books were already in widespread use in Christian churches, and which books were considered useful and truthful by the standards of the surviving memory and oral tradition about the teachings of Jesus. Also there are Christian churches out there who don’t adhere to all of the Nicean council’s choices. Some Christians consider the Apocrypha canon, or semi canon, and the Catholic church has preserved a long tradition of recognizing it. There are Christians who consider themselves Gnostic in some way or study the Ghostic gospels, like the awesome scholar Elaine Pagels, who has a lot of great books of Gnosticism out. Bringing in issues of translation and reception history problematize the canon even more. A classic Seminary Asshole Move is to respond to someone referencing the Bible with “which Bible”? It wont win you friends and I don’t recommend it but hey, it’s not wrong.

So the canon is really more of a best-guess scenario motivated by a sincere desire for Christian unity, orthodoxy, and clear teaching. However, I think the messiness of the Christian canon should always steer us clear of biblioidolatry, and remind us that knowledge of God can never be reduced to a single book. It should also always keep up hungry for new information while nurturing our ability to be discerning about various truth claims we hear on a daily basis. Biblical engagement has never been a passive game. You’ve got to be willing to put your back into it and get your hands dirty.  

-S