p: samantha barks

8

thénardiers: they belonged to that bastard class formed of low people who have risen, and intelligent people who have fallen, which lies between the classes called middle and lower, and which unites some of the faults of the latter with nearly all the vices of the former, without possessing the generous impulses of the workman, or the respectability of the bourgeois. (VICTOR HUGO)

Flamme à Lunettes (Flames and Glasses)
Samantha Barks
Flamme à Lunettes (Flames and Glasses)

A new song featuring Samantha called “Flamme à Lunettes (Flames and Glasses)” from Jack and The Cuckoo Clock Heart. Lyrics below:

Miss Acacia:
My vision’s not quite right
But glasses make me look a sight
Enough to give the world a fright
Like a sprite wearing specs

Jack:
Oh fiery little sprite
Conflagration in the night
Don’t play games with your sight
If it leaves you in the dark

Miss Acacia:
I prefer, life all the blur
I forget to wear my glasses
When I sing I share caresses
It feels good to close my eyes

Jack:
Oh my pretty arsenist
Let me clasp you close to me
Or rip your clothes with my teeth
And tear them into confetti
To scatter as we kiss….

Miss Acacia:
Confetti?

Jack:
….On you and me

Miss Acacia:
All I see are stars
Suddenly some days
My eyes leave me astray
Faraway down the street
Until I can’t bare to steal
A glance at the sun
Or even look the sky straight in the eye
All I see are stars

Jack:
I won’t let you stray
I’ll be your only guide
Let me be your pair of eyes
You will be my special flame

Miss Acacia:
There’s one thing I must confess
Of five senses my hearing’s best
I’ll never recognize you by relying on my eyes

Jack:
Smoldering embers, alone in the dark
We’ll raise cascades of sparks
As the clock of my heart
Strikes midnight we’ll catch on fire
And blaze so bright you’ll see the light

Miss Acacia and Jack:
All I see are stars
Suddenly some days
My eyes leave me astray
Faraway down the street
Until I can’t bare to steal
A glance at the sun
Or even look the sky straight in the eye
All I see are stars

4

une rose dans la misère
singular fact, she had become more wretched and more beautiful, two steps which seemed impossible. she had accomplished a double progress towards the light, and towards distress. she was barefooted and in rags, as on the day when she had so resolutely entered his room, only her rags were two months older; the holes were larger, the tatters dirtier. it was the same rough voice, the same forehead tanned and wrinkled by exposure; the same free, wild, and wandering gaze. she had, in addition to her former expression, that mixture of fear and sorrow which the experience of a prison adds to misery. (VICTOR HUGO)