p&p

honestly besides the romance my favorite part of pride and prejudice has to be how much of a complete Disaster the bennet family is,,,,,,,like mr bennet is sarcastic af and never tells his family anything until like the hour before it happens (“btw ur cousin that you’ve never even met before and who could throw ur asses out on the streets one day is coming for dinner at 4”),,,,,mrs bennet is the total Can I Speak To The Manager mom who always threatens to pass out even if she’s never passed out once in her entire life,,,,lydia practically stalks military men and was once voted most likely to run away from home forever for a laugh,,,,,kitty would probably burn the house down if lydia told her it was a good idea,,,,,mary is the epitome of that one person who memorizes only six lines from a textbook and says “knowledge is power” for three days after,,,,,,,,jane would practically apologize to someone who was stabbing her,,,,and im almost 1000% sure that elizabeth has at least once stood up on the dining room table and yelled at her family “fight me then” when she’s angry,,,,,,literally the original sitcom family

idk who u are or where i am. if you diss pride and prejudice im comin for ur ungrateful ass. we could be standing at the alter abt to say ‘i do’ and if you say ‘ugh i hate pride and prejudice’ id fcking leave you. id walk out of my own wedding. i could be under anesthesia about to have major surgery and hear my doctor say ‘i never liked austen novels’ and id wake up just to request a different doctor. u could be the president of the united states and say ‘they’re just love stories’ and id deck you right there, right in front of secret service. im waiting and im ready to fight

anonymous asked:

pride and prejudice wasn't written as a resistance to the patriarchy djdjfhdhsj what

i mean i’ve been staring at this message for a solid minute now pondering how to reply, trying to figure out how ro reply, but honestly it boils down to one question: have you read it?

because literally the prevalent theme of pride & prejudice as well as other works of Austen—perhaps most visibly, sense & sensibility—is the ironic social commentary on the degraded role of women, as subjected and dependent on the way of whether they would marry well as they used to be?

like, honestly, what did you think it was about? sure it has a romance in it, but it’s probably one of the the most politically designed and carried out romantical arcs in literature, as it relies not so much on mutual affection, but rather darcy aknowledging his fault of diminishing elizabeth as an intelligent human being. at first, we see him as quite obviously set upon taking her for granted and applying stereotypes; startled with her outspoken attitude and clueless as to why she would reject him. because it IS surprising, that’s the point, given the context of Austen’s novel, the commonly praised choice would be to accept not only darcy, but mr collins without another thought. what do you think is the reason mrs bennet was so distraught all the time? there was no way of securing the future of her daughters other than marriage, we hear it being repeated over and over again—they cannot inherit their father’s fortune.

and—good grief. that’s the romantic ‘main plot’ concerning darcy and elizabeth alone, because the whole point is that he changes his beliefs and acknowledges elizabeth as an equal in the end. darcy isn’t exceptional for being surly and broody, he’s exceptional because he listens and learns.

but all the rest? the whole arc of charlotte, and her unhappy and dull marriage to mr collins, and the stark contrast with elizabeth. charlotte is not WRONG, she does the only thing she knows for certain will allow her to live in a respectful way without becoming ‘a burden to her parents’. the arc of lydia, basing off her portrayal against wickham? even with all his debt, infamy and faults, wickham’s opinion is at no point more blemished than lydia’s. that’s the point, that’s reiteraring the original notion of the disparity between men and women in regency England. the radiating, stinging paternalistic attitude of mr collins towards elizabeth when he marries charlotte and TELLS her that she would probably get no better chance. his absolute belief—corresponding with darcy’s, and contrasted with the latter’s rehabilitation later on—that elizabeth has no choice but accept him.

and elizabeth herself—for all the composition and impeccable manners, she IS a controversial figure in the novel. take the scene when she’s bashed by lady catherine de bourgh, the ongoing commentary on her being too forward with her opinions, the continuous bashing coming from her mother—the lingering threat that lizzy’s ‘stubbornness’ will cause her much trouble and, above all, prevent her from securing both her and the other sisters from absolute poverty when their father dies.

and, just … of course it’s written subtly, it’s conveyed in elizabeth’s wit, in austen’s slightly ironic narrative. the problem with the situation of women is not EXPLICITLY named and stated. it’s not modern times where we’re accustomed to forward addressing of feminist issues. no: it’s shown. it is not only the consistent theme in her works, it’s the prevalent theme of them. i mean, come on, there’s tonnes and tonnes of books that were NOT written with a purpose of targeting partiarchy. fuck, there are much MORE of such books than there is of the latter kind. But to choose Pride & Prejudice specifically, a novel which became one of the most famous books in the world, renowned for e x a c t l y t h i s … i cannot comprehend. please, at least consider this: do you really think the purpose of austen writing p&p was writing a romance? really? why would it become so much of a literature landmark, then?

i don’t mean to be nasty and honestly, go and have your opinion, you’re perfectly entitled to it, but it does make me sad that a novel that is a witty, outsanding and one of a kind social commentary on the plight of women in a specific time period written by a woman IN the time period is turned into something as common as a novel with a romantic plot. that’s all.

  • Fitzwilliam: remember that when you propose to Elizabeth Bennet today that you mention how much you love her and all the qualities that you adore the most about her, just like we rehearsed Darcy
  • Darcy: Elizabeth I just want you to know that I love and admire you so much that I'm willing to ignore the fact that you're completely broke and that your family is really embarrassing and has nothing to offer me
  • Fitzwilliam: So not at all like we rehearsed then