ozu film

20 Favourite New-to-Me Films of 2016

That is, my 20 favourite films I saw for the first time in 2016 (in no particular order):

  • Duelle (une quarantaine) | Jacques Rivette | 1976
  • Dante’s Inferno | Ken Russell | 1967
  • Hiroshima Mon Amour | Alain Resnais | 1959
  • Les rendez-vous d'Anna | Chantal Akerman | 1978
  • Exhibition | Joanna Hogg | 2013
  • Horse Money | Pedro Costa | 2014
  • Dekalog | Krzysztof Kieslowski | 1989-1990
  • The Forbidden Room | Guy Maddin / Evan Johnson | 2015
  • The Duke of Burgundy | Peter Strickland | 2014
  • Ivan’s Childhood | Andrei Tarkovsky | 1962
  • Good Bye, Dragon Inn | Tsai Ming-liang | 2003
  • The White Dove | Frantisek Vlácil | 1960
  • Tokyo Drifter | Seijun Suzuki | 1966
  • The Terrorizers | Edward Yang | 1986
  • The Lobster | Yorgos Lanthimos | 2015
  • Buddha Collapsed Out of Shame | Hana Makhmalbaf | 2007
  • Certain Women | Kelly Reichardt | 2016
  • Nights of Cabiria | Federico Fellini | 1957
  • Come and See | Elem Klimov | 1985
  • Opening Night | John Cassavetes | 1977

As usual I’ve done the “only one film per director” thing, (so Duelle just beat OUT 1 for example…)

In Yasujiro Ozu’s Dragnet Girl (1933), the influence of American gangster films is spelled out, literally, in the English movie posters, signs, and handbills that paper the sets, as well as in the pulsing spectacle of jazz bands, dance halls, boxing gyms, fedoras, pin-stripe suits, and bias-cut evening gowns. Ozu both acknowledges his own debt to Hollywood and suggests the way his characters’ lives, their hearts and minds, have been infiltrated by western pop culture. Dazzlingly stylized, spirited and kinetic, Dragnet Girl is also an intimate, compassionate study of young people caught in the cultural cross fire. For all its snappy and whimsical homages to Warner Brothers gangster flicks, this is still an Ozu film, ending not with gunshots or kisses but with a still life in an empty room.

Dark Passages: Exile at Home