outline work

Ways to un-stick a stuck story
  • Do an outline, whatever way works best. Get yourself out of the word soup and know where the story is headed.
  • Conflicts and obstacles. Hurt the protagonist, put things in their way, this keeps the story interesting. An easy journey makes the story boring and boring is hard to write.
  • Change the POV. Sometimes all it takes to untangle a knotted story is to look at it through different eyes, be it through the sidekick, the antagonist, a minor character, whatever.
  • Know the characters. You can’t write a story if the characters are strangers to you. Know their likes, dislikes, fears, and most importantly, their motivation. This makes the path clearer.
  • Fill in holes. Writing doesn’t have to be linear; you can always go back and fill in plotholes, and add content and context.
  • Have flashbacks, hallucinations, dream sequences or foreshadowing events. These stir the story up, deviations from the expected course add a feeling of urgency and uncertainty to the narrative.
  • Introduce a new mystery. If there’s something that just doesn’t add up, a big question mark, the story becomes more compelling. Beware: this can also cause you to sink further into the mire.
  • Take something from your protagonist. A weapon, asset, ally or loved one. Force him to operate without it, it can reinvigorate a stale story.
  • Twists and betrayal. Maybe someone isn’t who they say they are or the protagonist is betrayed by someone he thought he could trust. This can shake the story up and get it rolling again.
  • Secrets. If someone has a deep, dark secret that they’re forced to lie about, it’s a good way to stir up some fresh conflict. New lies to cover up the old ones, the secret being revealed, and all the resulting chaos.
  • Kill someone. Make a character death that is productive to the plot, but not “just because”. If done well, it affects all the characters, stirs up the story and gets it moving.
  • Ill-advised character actions. Tension is created when a character we love does something we hate. Identify the thing the readers don’t want to happen, then engineer it so it happens worse than they imagined.
  • Create cliff-hangers. Keep the readers’ attention by putting the characters into new problems and make them wait for you to write your way out of it. This challenge can really bring out your creativity.
  • Raise the stakes. Make the consequences of failure worse, make the journey harder. Suddenly the protagonist’s goal is more than he expected, or he has to make an important choice.
  • Make the hero active. You can’t always wait for external influences on the characters, sometimes you have to make the hero take actions himself. Not necessarily to be successful, but active and complicit in the narrative.
  • Different threat levels. Make the conflicts on a physical level (“I’m about to be killed by a demon”), an emotional level (“But that demon was my true love”) and a philosophical level (“If I’m forced to kill my true love before they kill me, how can love ever succeed in the face of evil?”).
  • Figure out an ending. If you know where the story is going to end, it helps get the ball rolling towards that end, even if it’s not the same ending that you actually end up writing.
  • What if? What if the hero kills the antagonist now, gets captured, or goes insane? When you write down different questions like these, the answer to how to continue the story will present itself.
  • Start fresh or skip ahead. Delete the last five thousand words and try again. It’s terrifying at first, but frees you up for a fresh start to find a proper path. Or you can skip the part that’s putting you on edge – forget about that fidgety crap, you can do it later – and write the next scene. Whatever was in-between will come with time.
5

Maybe my dreams were too big,
                      Or my love too strong,
                              ‘Cause, after all, we get what we d e s e r v e.
                                                                         don’t we?

2

hard times 💗💜💙
gonna make you wonder why you even try ✨

anonymous asked:

Dialogue prompts: 9, 37, or 47. Love your writing!

Thank you so much lovely anon! Dialogue prompts were  “You’re in love with her.” + “Lie to me then.” 47: “Why are you whispering?” Set in season 6, around Arcadia. 

“What is he doing here?” That’s the first thing Bill Scully says, or spits rather, when he opens the door. He doesn’t look at his sister, who he hasn’t seen in months, but only at her partner. The spooky man who is followed by doom and therefore has no right to be here, at his house, with his family; at least that’s how Mulder interprets Bill Scully’s current expression. Mulder tightens his grip on to the plate with the huge cake neatly tucked into too much tinfoil that Scully pushed into his arms moments ago.

“He was invited.” Scully rushes past her brother, leaving Mulder outside in the cold, fending for himself. When she’s angry she can forget him, sometimes. They’re similar in that way. He knows this. Mulder offers the cake like a peace offering. Or something. Bill stares at it. Then back at Mulder. His eyes narrow and for once they’re in agreement: they both wish Mulder wasn’t here.

“No one told me you were invited.” Mulder isn’t surprised.

“I was told you were fine with it.” He replies; he really should have known better. Bill yanks the plate out of his hands, the only outlet for his anger, and leaves the door open so Mulder can enter. He’s not welcome here, that much is clear, but Bill Scully Jr. is not going to let him rot outside. Mulder closes the door quietly behind him, taking a deep breath. He should have said no when Scully asked him to come with her to San Diego. He should have insisted. He had, if he remembers correctly. Until that moment when Maggie Scully herself called him and told him to be there or else.

Right now he thinks or else would have been the better choice.

“Fox!” Maggie Scully downright squeals when he enters the kitchen as discreetly as he can muster. Several heads turn; he recognizes Tara Scully, his very own Scully, and a woman he has never seen before, who looks almost as uncomfortable as he feels.

“Hello Mrs. Scully.” She grabs him and engulfs him in a tight hug.

“I’m glad you came,” she wipes at his cheek, a motherly automatism, “I wasn’t sure.” She adds more quietly glancing at her son, who is busy trying to free the cake from the tinfoil.

“You remember Tara, don’t you?” Bill Scully’s wife offers him a warm smile and a strong handshake.

“Nice to see you again, Fox. Oh, you prefer Mulder, don’t you? Dana always calls you Mulder!” She laughs uncomfortably and blushes deeply.

“I’m fine with either.” He assures her and he is certain he can hear Scully huff.

“And this is my other daughter-in-law, Sandra. She’s Charlie’s wife.” Mulder and Sandra exchange a handshake and a nod that seems to say I’d rather be somewhere else right now.

“Is Charlie here? I’ve never met him before.”

“He’s expected later tonight.” Maggie Scully tells him and he watches Sandra’s expression soften, just thinking about her husband getting here, saving her from the rest of his family. Mulder turns around to look at Scully. She’s leaning against the counter, her arms crossed in front of her. Not even she wants him here. He can’t blame her, not really. They might have the x-files back, might be back together professionally, but the ramifications of the last months are still painfully palpable. Diana, he thinks bitterly, swallowing her name and the thought. Things that were said that shouldn’t have been said. Things done. He stares at her, bites his lip, and she turns away from him, nudging her brother and helping him get the tinfoil off the cake. Mulder is convinced that no one will eat it anyway.

Maggie Scully shoos them all out of the kitchen when it becomes apparent that neither of them is any help. Tara and Sandra are talking about babies; little Matthew is upstairs sleeping. Sandra and Charlie, apparently, are trying. Mulder tries to catch Scully’s attention, but she’s either willfully ignoring him, or truly lost in her own world. He feels anger well up in him. If she really doesn’t want him here then why didn’t she just say so? He is sure she could have come up with an excuse for him. Her brother hates him already, what’s a few more Scullys? He could have taken it.

“Can I talk to you a moment?” Bill Scully’s voice is harsh and it’s way too close for Mulder’s liking. He nods, swallows hard. He follows the other man, wherever they’re going, and now Scully looks at him. Mulder wants to ask her to save him, please, but his mouth is dry, his mind empty. Which is why he doesn’t first notice that Bill Scully is leading him outside. Once there, he towers over him, his hands on his hips, his face dark. He’s going to punch me, Mulder thinks, or worse.

“You’re in love with her.” Of all the things Mulder expected Bill Scully to throw at him this is not it.

“Excuse me?”

“You are, aren’t you? You’re in love with Dana.” It’s not even a question.

“You sure you want to know the answer to that?” Stupid, Mulder. Stupid, stupid. He doesn’t want to make Bill even angrier. He just doesn’t want him to know before he’s had a chance to tell Scully. Well, he has told her. And she didn’t take him seriously. Oh brother, indeed.

“Lie to me then. Make me try to understand why my mother – my own mother – invited you here. If you love her…if you are in love with her… I still couldn’t stand you, but. I saw the way you just looked at her, Mulder.” He used to look at her a million different ways, or so he thought. Depending on the time of day, on her mood, and mostly his. On where they were, or why. On what she was wearing. In the end he realized it wasn’t true. There might still be a million different ways he looks at her now. Except they all mean the same.

“I’m not going to lie to you, Bill,” Mulder begins, “I do love her. I am in love with her. We’re not… we’re not together though, if that’s what you mean. But yes. I’m in love with her. Have been for a long time. She doesn’t feel the same way. Not like… she’s not in the same place. I came here because your mother invited me. If… if Dana doesn’t want me here either, I’ll just leave. I’ll just… leave.” As if on cue, the front door opens and Scully steps out.

“You’re not making him leave, Bill.” She tells her big brother and Mulder knows that tone all too well. It means business. He’s been on the receiving end of it often enough.

“I wasn’t going to make him leave.” Bill mumbles and stomps past Mulder. He stops in front of Dana and for a moment the siblings stare at each other, then suddenly, they’re hugging and grinning. “Glad you could make it, sis.” With that he disappears inside. Scully walks towards Mulder and he watches her, wondering what she’s thinking. But he’s always wondering.

“What makes you think I don’t want you here?” Her voice is soft, as are her eyes.

“I thought… I don’t know, Scully. We haven’t talked much lately, have we?” She shakes her head no, takes a step closer. They’re almost touching. The urge to take her into his arms is almost unbearable.

“But just so you know, I do want you here. I’m glad you’re here.” Her voice is barely above a whisper now and Mulder lowers his head to hers, just to hear her better. He tells himself that’s the only reason, anyway.

“I’m glad to be here, too.”

“You’re not the only person in that place, Mulder.”

“Hm?”

“You said I’m not in the same place you are. But I am, Mulder. I am.” She’s lost him. He stares at her, not understanding a word she’s saying. She watches him, hoping he’ll catch up, which he doesn’t, and takes his face into her hands.

“I’m in love with you, too, Mulder. You’re not the only person in that place.” With that, she puts her lips on his softly, just a test, merely a tease. Her hands remain where they are, her thumbs gently caressing his cheeks.

“You are?” He’s whispering now, too, too scared to say it out loud. She nods, grinning. “Why are you whispering? Wait, no, how do you even know what I said?”

“We could all hear you and Bill,” Scully tells him, still whispering, “the baby monitor.” She points at the colorful monitor sitting there in the grass. “Tara forgot to bring it inside after playing with Matthew. I’m glad she did.”

“Oh, so am I.”  

*Posts picture to Twitter* I wonder if Liam will like this one.

*Within a minute* Liam: MOVE I NEED TO LIKE THIS IMAGE IMMEDIATELY.

3

“It’s not too late to set things right.”

I’mmm still real messed up over little Caligosto here…I do wonder what his younger self would think about his grown up self’s actions….and I wanted him to interact more with Raz, since Cali’s sanity seems to be the most intact in his childhood; you do find his moral compass there, after all. Also I just wanted to get that poor kid a hug in some way aaaa

I think it’s interesting (in the most bitter, horrible way possible) that with Mr. and Mrs. Loboto trying to get rid of a “monster”, they really just ended up creating one. :T World’s worst parents everyone!

Outlining your novel scene by scene (Part 1)

Did you ever feel bored midway writing a scene? Or lukewarm? Do you feel like readers will jump full chunks of text?

Well, I used to feel that all the time.

I disliked outline with a passion. I thought it stole the magic away from creation. I thought it would trap my story in a box. Whenever I tried, I had no idea where to start, so I blamed outlining all over again. I would just write the first scene and allow my story to unfold itself. Although it is fun to let your story take the lead, it’s also chaotic.

I realized the importance of outlining on my third book. After months and months of hard work, my story turned out just… boring. Weak characters. A plot full of holes. No defined theme. Useless scenes. And a story that started with a goal, but changed so many times along the pages and accomplished almost nothing. Slow. Tedious. I was frustrated. I had to delete more than half to make it work. Even after rewriting, I wasn’t happy. That project was a major fail.

Originally posted by failworldblog

And failing was good, because, on my next project, I outlined. 

I listed all arcs and, within the arcs, all scenes. I was mad. I wanted control. I wanted power. And I only sat down to write when I knew exactly what was going to happen from start to finish. I never wrote something that fast and effortlessly in my life. It didn’t take away the magic of writing, it simply gave me a sense of direction.

Outline is a map. And when you have a map, you have a journey to make.

Originally posted by artymissk

If, like me, you are a bit lost, here’s how you can create the map for your next novel, or how to outline your book scene by scene. I’ll share with you three techniques, but will divide them into three posts. This is the part one. Or the Map Technique.

I advice you to grab pen and paper, and move away from the computer. Find a comfortable spot, maybe a coffee shop, or by your window. And let’s work!

Originally posted by sashabloodsoup

Before outlining, write down your storyline in one phrase. I’ll be using an example to help you understand this technique. So, my storyline is:

Masked twins fight against a violent dictatorship.

Now, let’s start.

In every journey, we need a departure point and an arrival point. This is essential for a map. And, if it’s essential for a map, it’s essential for our outline. So, create the start (departure) and the end (arrival) of your story. With my example, it goes:

  • Twins have their lives destroyed by the government (departure)
  • They destroy the government (arrival)

Amazing!! Our map is taking form. 

What else a journey must have? Milestones. Without milestones, we don’t know how far we are from the arrival. They are essential as well. But how can we put milestones in an outline? Easy. Between departure and arrival, you will list every important arc (or event, or key scene, or plot point) that must happen in order to take the plot from start to end. More or less like this:

  • Twins have their lives destroyed by the government (departure)
    • Their family is destroyed
    • They are taken in by their uncle
    • Uncle and twins plan their revenge
    • Twins find their mask
    • Twins perform small acts of justice
    • They gain the respect of the citizens
    • Government sees them as threat
    • Government tries to erase them
    • Twins perform huge acts of justice
    • They are almost killed 
    • Uncle is killed
    • They perform one last act of justice by killing the dictator
    • Citizens claim for democracy
    • Democracy is installed
    • The twins destroy their masks 
  • They destroy the government (arrival)

All milestones are placed, nothing too fancy, just a description of what we’ll be seeing along the journey. Good. 

From milestone to milestone, we have roads, or sequences of roads. Between arcs, write down sequences of scenes that must happen to move the plot forward. For example: 

  • Twins have their lives destroyed by the government (departure)
    • Their family is destroyed
      • Twins live with their father (who is an important journalist)
      • Father is abducted by the government
      • Social worker takes them to lonely uncle
    • They are taken in by their uncle
      • Twins and uncle can’t adjust to new life
      • They are all filled with grief
      • Uncle comes up with revenge plan
    • Uncle and twins plan their revenge
      • Twins trains while uncle perfects his plan
      • Twins and uncle adjust to new life
      • They become a family
    • Twins find their mask
      • Getting ready for their first step
    • Twins perform small acts of justice
      • They destroy factory that uses slave force
      • They kill politician who closed hospitals
      • They kill a famous torturer for the government party
      • They find their father’s file
      • Discover that father was tortured and killed
    • They gain the respect of the citizens

We are almost there… 

Because, in every mile of the road, we have landscapes. Scenes are landscapes. And we need hundreds of different landscapes along the journey, beautiful ones, strange ones, unexpected ones… we need scenes. To every sequence, create as many scenes as you need:

  • Twins have their lives destroyed by the government (departure)
    • Their family is destroyed
      • Twins live with their father (who is an important journalist)
        • Father receives a journalism award
        • Twins enjoy the party
        • It’s time to go
        • Father drives them home
      • Father is abducted by the government
        • In isolated street, the car is stoped
        • Two man attacks them and abducts their father
        • One of the twins receive a scar on their face
        • Twins are left alone in deserted street
      • Social worker takes them to lonely uncle
        • Social worker takes them from the hospital
        • Drives them to poor area
        • Leaves them with unknown uncle
    • They are taken in by their uncle
      • Twins and uncle can’t adjust to new life
        • Twins can’t eat
        • Twins won’t leave the house
        • Uncle tries to get information on what happened to his brother, but fails
        • It’s believed that their father died
      • They are all filled with grief
        • Uncle and twins have a sincere talk about father, they tell past stories, they laugh, they cry
        • For the first time, they have dinner together
      • Uncle comes up with revenge plan

You can almost see the story playing inside your head like a movie. That’s the magic of a scene by scene outline. :D

This last step is optional. But it’s a great exercise to trim the rough edges. Under each scene, catalog which character(s) you’ll need, what place(s) will be used, what does the scene accomplishes and ways it can unfold. Example:

  • Father receives a journalism award
    • Characters: Father, twins, father’s coworkers, VIPs
    • Place: Banquet hall 
    • Accomplishment: To show that father is a famous journalist that gives no chills for what the dictator says
    • Possibilities: 
      • Father is announced as the award winner
      • Speech against the dictator
      • Ends speech by showing his love for his son/daughter(s)
      • Twins are proud (and kind of embarrassed as well)
      • Applause, applause
      • Nice food
      • Beautiful dresses
      • It’s the twins birthday
      • Or it’s Christmas
      • Open hall with garden
      • Fireworks
      • Rich people

Takes time, but, now, you have the most detailed map a traveller can possess. It’s easy to depart, just take a seat and enjoy the ride.

Originally posted by mr-nikolo

I hope it helps somehow. Next time I’ll show you a different technique. 

anonymous asked:

๐Ÿ”Š๐Ÿ”Š๐Ÿ”Š๐Ÿ—ฃ๐Ÿ—ฃ๐Ÿ—ฃ!!!!JIN CALLING JUNGKOOK BABY, FRICK YES!!!!๐Ÿ—ฃ๐Ÿ—ฃ๐Ÿ—ฃ๐Ÿ”Š๐Ÿ”Š๐Ÿ”Š

Jungkook: asdfdgeaef– 

Is it time for autumn? My pulse is feeling it.

¿Es hora de otoño? Mi pulso lo está sintiendo.

anonymous asked:

Since you brought up the sort of myths with fandom vs what you've seen in tv... I'm sure you've seen in probably all fandoms, there comes a time when a collective comes together to say that something is/isn't happening because of "X movie company" or "management". So my question is - from behind the scenes, how much of that is actually true? Like are there people really holding the strings like that? Or are we going crazy? ๐Ÿ˜ณ

The answer is it’s complicated.

Also, you’re not crazy.

Let me start by comparing TV writing to book writing. I just wrote a book, and I only got creative notes from one person, my editor. She does two rounds of notes with me (a general edit and a line edit) and then passes me off to the copyeditor, who gives me grammar and spelling and continuity notes. Then it goes to print! Easy peasy! (Well, not easy at all, it’s a lot of work, but very straightforward.)

Compare that process to the TV writing process. Every Rdale script is broken (meaning: figured out) in the writer’s room, where there are 11 writers plus Roberto, our fair boss and Showrunner. We all chime in with ideas and suggestions and Roberto decides what direction he likes best and chooses the pitches that work best until we have a working outline. Then we put the scenes onto notecards, moving them around, re-breaking, rejiggering, until the story works. That’s a lot of hands stirring the pot so far, but we have one head chef: Roberto.

Then we write an outline, which gets notes from the producers, the studio (Warner Brothers), and the network (CW). Then we adjust based on those notes, which come from a few of the execs at each company, who are smart and very good at their jobs, which involves reading and analyzing TV scripts from many shows and deciding what works well for them. They’re drawing on their whole careers-worth of experience doing this on lots of different shows to figure out how to guide the direction of Rdale.

Then we go to script. The writer of that episode takes the very detailed outline and starts writing scenes. Sometimes s/he might farm out some scenes to other people in the writers room, or sometimes the room will move on to the next episode and leave that writer to write solo.

Then the completed script goes to Roberto, who does a pass on it to make it sound like his vision for the show, and feel like the characters he has in his head.

Then, when he’s happy, he brings it back to the writers room and we all read it and go through it page by page together to revise it and give notes. At this point, Roberto has the script open on a computer in front of him, and he changes dialogue, action lines, scenes, etc. live as we give feedback.

Then, the script goes back to the producers, the studio, and the network, to get notes from them. Sometimes those notes are minimal, and sometimes they’re major, it all depends. The writer and Roberto make revisions based on those notes. Sometimes we have to go back to the room and rebreak as a group, but usually not.

Somewhere along the way, someone at Archie Comics reads it to make sure we’re taking care of the characters they’ve had and loved for 75 years.

At some point, someone in a legal department reads it for clearance, which means sometimes we can’t use certain brand names in dialogue or else we’ll get sued, and we can’t use certain people’s names unless they’re in the public eye.

Also someone in some department reads it to make sure we aren’t swearing too much or referring to something too vulgar or the FCC will fine us.

Then the script is sent up to Vancouver where production reads it and starts pre-production. Sometimes there are changes to the script at that point because we can’t get a location or we can’t get an actor because he’s booked on another series, or the weather won’t allow us to shoot somewhere, or we have to move an outdoor scene indoors, or a night scene to day for budget reasons. Revisions are made here. The actors read it, and occasionally they’ll have notes which require revisions.

Then it gets shot. Then the footage is sent to post-production, who starts to edit it. In the edit, frequently we’ll learn that our episodes are several (maybe many) minutes over, and we’ll have to cut lines, jokes, moments, sometimes whole scenes for time.

Then those rough cuts get sent to the producers, the studio, the network for notes.

You get the idea yet? There are lots and LOTS of hands in the pie here. Hundreds, maybe a thousand. If a certain idea isn’t making it through from initial pitch to the final screen, it could be any one of the people along the way raising a red flag. Usually there’s no grand conspiracy – there’s too many people with competing interests for that. If you find that you’re less than satisfied with something on your screen, it could be for the devious reason you suspect or it could be for a completely benign reason like budget or schedule. There’s no one grand puppetmaster holding the strings, but there are lots of people making changes along the way.

tldr: There are too many companies and too many people for any kind of grand conspiracy, but that doesn’t mean that a bunch of people giving tiny notes couldn’t add up to something bigger.

2

03.27.17  |  24/100 Days of Productivity

Setting the mood for some essay writing 😎. I finished annotations for my sources. Now I need to firm up a thesis and an outline. Work, work, work.