outer space base

Humans are Space Orcs - Injuries

I have been loving this tag so much for so long, I think about it all the time. I especially love ones where aliens react to humans getting injuries that the humans are super chill about. What if a human on an alien crew did something and ended up getting a huge smack to the head? Like black and purple bruises, eye swollen shut, the works


Captain Kar’rim scuttled down the corridor as fast as he could. He had just got word that Kate, one of the three humans on the crew, had sustained major head injuries. 

From the brief report he had been sent, Human Kate, as well as one of the other humans, Vincent, had been spending their allotted recreation time playing what they called “baseball.” It was something they often did. It consisted of the two of them throwing a small white ball back and forth at each other at high velocity. It didn’t see like it was much of a game, but the humans assured Kar’rim that an actual game of this baseball was a favorite past-time among their kind.

Typical that such a dangerous activity would be considered a human past-time, he thought, clicking his mandibles in a mixture of annoyance and anxiety.

According to the report, there had been a slight miscalculation on Kate’s part of the trajectory of the ball. Instead of landing in her glove, it hit her in her face. HER FACE! Kar’rim had not yet lost a member of his crew on any voyage. A fact he was very proud of. He was not going to lose that record because of a human game of all things!

Kar’rim reached the medical bay. He spotted Demfar, the crew’s medic trying, unsuccessfully trying to use whatever tentacles could be spared to shoo an effyn and two humans away from a hospital bed.

“Demfar, how is she?” He could see the answer to his question as soon as he asked it. Human Kate lay on the bed, her face looked almost unrecognizable. Her cheekbone and brow were so swollen, he couldn’t even see her left eye. Alarming shades of blue and purple were spreading across the left side of her face. Demfar passed a small bag of ice to Kate, who moved it slowly across her injury.

“By all things bright and…Human Kate! Stay with us, you’re going to pull through!” Kar’rim wasn’t really sure about that last part, but it seemed like the right thing to say. It was positive. Reassuring. To both Kate and himself. It was a lie, nonetheless. He looked at Demfar, who was applying a copious amount of pungent oils to the human’s darkening skin. 

How long does she have left to live? Kar’rim tried to send the question to Demfar silently, mentally willing the question to the medic’s brain. He didn’t want to ask aloud. It was rude to speak about death in front of the dying.

Neither Kar’rim nor Demfar possessed telepathic abilities, but Demfar seemed to pick up the question anyway.

“The humans have explained the situation to me. Human Kate will make a full recovery. As soon as I am finished checking for signs of a concussion, I will mend a few of the ruptured capillaries, and she will be free to go. The contusions and swelling should be gone in a day or two.” Having finished applying the oils, Demfar used a free tentacle to replace the lids to the oil vials and placed them in Kate’s hands. “Apply more of this whenever you get a chance until the ‘bruises’ fade.”

Kar’rim wasn’t sure if he heard the medic correctly. A day or two? Full recovery? Free to go? Had Demfar LOOKED at the patient?! He knew humans were hardy, but surely… these wounds?! The head trauma!? The report said the ball the humans had been “playing” with had been traveling an estimated 86 glatts per segment. An injury like that would have killed most species!

“What… what about her eye? Will she be able to see out of it again?”

“Ha, if not, it probably won’t affect her game any!” Laughed Vincent. Kar’rim turned toward him with surprise. “What happened to you being the starting catcher back home? You can’t even keep your eye on the ball!”

“You shouldn’t have thrown it if I wasn’t looking, ya’ chucklehead!” complained Kate as Demfar held a small humming machine up to the darkest part of her face. “I was distracted, Bett was on fire!”

“Bett is a booka, they’re almost always on fire,” laughed Vincent. 

Demfar finished with the humming machine and straightened up. The darkest parts of Kate’s face were considerably lighter now. “You check out, you’re free to go.” Kate sat up and threw her legs over the side of the bed and stood up. “Don’t forget to apply the oils.”

“No prob, thanks Doc!” Kate called back as she left with her group. Kar’rim watched as they went, amazed. He knew humans were tough, their reputation was what had led him to eventually hire three onto his crew. What would have been a traumatic, life-threatening injury to many, humans seemed to see as just an inconvenience. With a sigh of relief, he muttered a phrase which had become very popular since the humans had joined the Galactic Alliance, “I’m glad they’re on our side.”

Eclipse 2017 From Space

On Aug. 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse passed over North America. People throughout the continent captured incredible images of this celestial phenomenon. We and our partner agencies had a unique vantage point on the eclipse from space. Here are a few highlights from our fleet of satellites that observe the Sun, the Moon and Earth.

Our Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which watches the Sun nearly 24/7 from its orbit 3,000 miles above Earth, saw a partial eclipse on Aug. 21.

SDO sees the Moon cross in front of the Sun several times a year. However, these lunar transits don’t usually correspond to an eclipse here on Earth, and an eclipse on the ground doesn’t guarantee that SDO will see anything out of the ordinary. In this case, on Aug. 21, SDO did see the Moon briefly pass in front of the Sun at the same time that the Moon’s shadow passed over the eastern United States. From its view in space, SDO only saw 14 percent of the Sun blocked by the Moon, while most U.S. residents saw 60 percent blockage or more.

Six people saw the eclipse from the International Space Station. Viewing the eclipse from orbit were NASA’s Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, the European Space Agency’s Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles.

From a million miles out in space, our Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera, or EPIC, instrument captured 12 natural color images of the Moon’s shadow crossing over North America. EPIC is aboard NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, where it photographs the full sunlit side of Earth every day, giving it a unique view of the shadow from total solar eclipses. EPIC normally takes about 20 to 22 images of Earth per day, so this animation appears to speed up the progression of the eclipse.

A ground-based image of the total solar eclipse – which looks like a gray ring – is superimposed over a red-toned image of the Sun’s atmosphere, called the corona. This view of the corona was captured by the European Space Agency and our Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO. At center is an orange-toned image of the Sun’s surface as seen by our Solar Dynamics Observatory in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths of light.

During a total solar eclipse, ground-based telescopes can observe the lowest part of the solar corona in a way that can’t be done at any other time, as the Sun’s dim corona is normally obscured by the Sun’s bright light. The structure in the ground-based corona image — defined by giant magnetic fields sweeping out from the Sun’s surface — can clearly be seen extending into the outer image from the space-based telescope. The more scientists understand about the lower corona, the more they can understand what causes the constant outward stream of material called the solar wind, as well as occasional giant eruptions called coronal mass ejections.

As millions of Americans watched the total solar eclipse that crossed the continental United States, the international Hinode solar observation satellite captured its own images of the awe-inspiring natural phenomenon. The images were taken with Hinode’s X-ray telescope, or XRT, as it flew above the Pacific Ocean, off the west coast of the United States, at an altitude of approximately 422 miles. Hinode is a joint endeavor by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, the European Space Agency, the United Kingdom Space Agency and NASA.

During the total solar eclipse our Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, in orbit around the Moon, turned one of its instruments towards Earth to capture an image of the Moon’s shadow over a large region of the United States.

As LRO crossed the lunar south pole heading north at 3,579 mph, the shadow of the Moon was racing across the United States at 1,500 mph. A few minutes later, LRO began a slow 180-degree turn to look back at Earth, capturing an image of the eclipse very near the location where totality lasted the longest. The spacecraft’s Narrow Angle Camera began scanning Earth at 2:25:30 p.m. EDT and completed the image 18 seconds later.

Sensors on the polar-orbiting Terra and Suomi NPP satellites gathered data and imagery in swaths thousands of miles wide. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS, sensor on Terra and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite, or VIIRS, on Suomi NPP captured the data used to make this animation that alternates between two mosaics. Each mosaic is made with data from different overpasses that was collected at different times.

This full-disk geocolor image from NOAA/NASA’s GOES-16 shows the shadow of the Moon covering a large portion of the northwestern U.S. during the eclipse.

Our Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS, mission captured this view of the Moon passing in front of the Sun on Aug. 21.  

Check out nasa.gov/eclipse to learn more about the Aug. 21, 2017, eclipse along with future eclipses, and follow us on Twitter for more satellite images like these: @NASASun, @NASAMoon, and @NASAEarth.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

Box Office: ‘Thor: Ragnarok’ Is Marvel’s Most Risk-Free Movie

We are now one month out from the release of Thor: Ragnarok ― well, the domestic release, anyway. The 17th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe opens on Nov. 3 in North America, but it’ll start its overseas roll-out (as does every MCU movie) in advance of its domestic debut. In this case, we’re two and a half weeks away.

Obviously, I haven’t seen the film quite yet and have no idea about its quality. It’s no secret that I’ve adored the trailers, both in terms of its 1980s video game/Star Wars rip-off visuals and its quirky humor, although once again I must remind you that both prior Thor films were pretty funny as well. It occurred to me that this 17th movie, eight and a half years into this gonzo MCU enterprise, is arguably the least risky movie ever in the MCU.

By that, I mean essentially nothing is at stake, and there’s nothing to prove with the Taika Waititi-directed fantasy adventure movie. Putting aside the whole “It’s probably going to do just fine!” argument for a moment, this is the first time, at least since The Incredible Hulk, that a new MCU movie hasn’t been, if not “risky,” then at least in the position of proving that X, Y or Z could bring about an MCU hit. From Iron Man to Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, there was almost always some burning question to be answered by the film’s financial reception. But this time out? Yeah, Thor: Ragnarok could pull a Good Dinosaur, and it really wouldn’t mean a damn thing. Let’s dive in, shall we?

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anonymous asked:

About your ep 7 spec and the pic of Becca crying. I think they witness the end of the world and humanity. They are in space and see how the bombs went off. You can see it in their faces… there is no hope left… and I think Becca will made it down to earth with the Polaris pod and the second AI

oooo that would fit the bill! I like that! I think that that scene is from the ‘outer-space base’ lab (Polaris), or it is on earth and is the ‘homebase’ (Polis Tower) during a ‘human trial’. I’m leaning now towards this scene being on Polaris, due to the lighting that makes it look like it is on a space station. ALIE released the bombs and she sees the bombs destroying Earth from space. It is possible that Chris might be on the intercom saying that ALIE got the codes. 

And yes, i do believe that Lexa’s tattoo is depicting Rebecca’s pod coming down to earth.