our experience

anonymous asked:

wow another misinformed person who thinks that straight aces and aros are lgbt. why am i not surprised. not every one belongs everywhere. you can accept straight aces and aros, but do not tell them that they are lgbt because they 100% are not. lgbt spaces are for lgbt people case closed. maybe you should brush up on lgbt issues before you invite straight people to be a part of our community.

Please take a step back and listen to how you just conducted that sentence. I’m not quite sure where you’re coming from in life, but it sounds like you’ve been through quite a bit with your identity. So have I. And when I found myself a member of the LGBTQIA+ community, I finally found a huge group of people who accepted me and supported me. I hope the same happened for you. And if not, I hope it happens soon, because everyone deserves that.

Consider people who observe no sexual or romantic attraction, which are legitimate identities, who feel wrong for one way or another. They’re asexual and/or aromantic, regardless of gay or straight, and that still falls under the A in the acronym, but I keep hearing that one half’s not different enough. Not oppressed enough. I would first say, none of us know everyone’s story, and there’s no way we will, so we don’t know what everyone has gone through with their identity. And second, when did this community become solely about how oppressed we are? [EDIT: Upon reviewing this, I should specify it is important to note the group was founded because of systemic oppression, and that is VERY important. I mean that we are also a group of support and lifting ourselves up and being proud of who we are as a diverse community, as well as continuing to fight the systemic oppression that faces many of us]. If we, as a group, achieve what I hope we can achieve idealistically and not be oppressed, are we still not a group to be proud of? Why wouldn’t we want this group to be an absolute celebration of all legitimate varieties? A celebration of all our unique experiences and struggles? They’re all different and valid.

Is this demographic of people with a legitimate sexual and/or romantic identity to make their own little group? To be made to feel like outcasts in the real world as well as in this group? I feel that this just furthers the negative, unfriendly attitude that already greatly exists in this world and I don’t wanna promote that. I just would think something like excluding would be for those who make us feel unsafe and that would only be on a case-by-case basis, not for a whole demographic who feel out of place and just want to belong, right? I don’t wanna be that way to people the way the world was to me. They’re not lgbt, but they are A, and that’s part of the LGBTQIA+ community, right? And of course I can’t change what you believe. And you’re right, I can accept them! I shall, because acceptance in this community is what inspired me and helped me when I felt lost, and I want to be that for others. [EDIT: I also want to stress that, the bottom line here is that all I’d like is for us to take time, ALL of us, asexuals and aromantics included, to educate ourselves, try to understand and respect each other’s individual struggles/experiences/stories, because they ARE all different. Empathy and trust is key because this line of distrust does not seem to be going in a positive direction. It seems to be leading to negativity, divisiveness, and name-calling and I don’t like seeing that. That’s not what I think many of us are trying to achieve. Sorry for typing so much haha]

Wanted: other asexuals to join my new crime-fighting squad. Our slogan is “too bad I have an ace up my sleeve… or several,” and you all gotta emerge dramatically from the shadows every time I say it. Now accepting applications.

cis lesbians who insist that the term lesbian only apply to people who use she/her pronouns have a fundamental misunderstanding of what it means to be a lesbian to begin with like. lesbians have been out there for years, breaking gender roles and you act like you can police what is and what isn’t lesbian based on the gender binary alone? smh

Heat wave

AU in which Newt brought Credence along to look for creatures, and real!Graves is in recovery inside the case. Let everyone be happy today :’D  
This started out as a sketch when the first heatwaves hit and took way too long to finish haha
Art blog: questionartbox 
[Print available!]

i’m sure this has all been said before but it’s so fucking tiring to read article after article and post after post by straight (or even just non-lesbian) feminists waxing poetic about the bechdel test. like yeah, obviously it’s indicative of a massive issue w the representation of women in media and a useful tool to gauge the failings of hollywood and big time show writers or whatever

but that wasn’t what it was fucking intended for. it was never about all women, it was about the lesbian experience. it was about the overwhelming loneliness of the lesbian identity and how far removed you feel from media. i feel this every day, and i have for the last decade that i’ve been out

it’s infuriating to watch straight women talk about the bechdel test at all (“my show is different – even though they’re talking about men, the story is about their friendship. it’s like turning the bechdel test on its head”) and even MORESO when they’re fucking criticizing it (“the bechdel test isn’t the end all be all… films can still be feminist and not pass it. films that don’t pass can be even more feminist than films that do!”)

it’s like…. the name of the fucking strip has the word “dyke” in it. have you all ever considered once that the original comic wasn’t ever meant for your consumption at all? have you ever thought about the fact that alison bechdel was writing as a lesbian about her lesbian experiences and that maybe, just maybe, this isn’t some generic feminist concept but instead a description of a lesbian-specific experience?

and the thing is that the liberal feminist application of the bechdel test has been criticized for not being intersectional – which it isn’t! movies about gay men and men of color are still incredibly groundbreaking and significant to our culture even though they “fail” the bechdel test

and that is LITERALLY BECAUSE the bechdel test wasn’t ever fucking MEANT to be the Generic Feminism Test Of Diversity And Equality – it was commentary specific to the lesbian experience when engaging with media

straight feminists historically hated and excluded lesbian feminists (and many do to this day lmao) but still, as always, want to co-opt and misappropriate our writing, concepts, and experiences to suit their needs

Lesbians are not, and will never be, imitating straight people. Any analysis of lesbian gender or experience that tries to draw parallels between lesbians and straights is inherently flawed. 

Femmes aren’t “lesbians who look straight.” Trans & butch lesbians aren’t “basically straight men.” Lesbian relationships aren’t “heteronormative.”  

Nothing lesbians do is replicating straightness. We live for ourselves, and our experiences, relationships, and identities are unique and genuine. 

consider yuri being incredibly obnoxious bc of his crush on otabek

for the first few months of him realizing he’s in love he literally will not shut up about him. all attempts of conversation immediately go to otabek

“yurio hows your quad loop” “beka can do a quad loop perfectly katsudon did you know that” “yes yura i know”

his twitter is filled with vague tweets that leave all of the yuri’s angels dying

his password on his phone is ‘beka’ in numbers (”2352″)

if mila hears the word “beka” come out of yuri’s mouth she just sighs and clears up her schedule for the next two hours bc god knows yuri will not let her go until she knows all about what otabek did last week

eventually everyone realizes who exactly yuri likes from his vague tweets and the next time theyre in competition and beka says “davai!” to yuri the crowd LOSES THEIR SHIT

and yuri is incredibly embarrassed

but he doesnt stop

(especially when he founds out otabek likes him too, and that his PDA is even worse than yuri’s)

sometimes i think gay (& bisexual) men need to dial back on how willing they are to let straight cis women in our spaces

and like, that’s a loaded phrase – this obviously isn’t all gay men, and i know that at the end of the day a handful of straight girls being at a gay bar isn’t the worst thing that could possibly happen… but as a lesbian i feel a lot of painful emotions about cishet women being in my spaces, especially when they’re sometimes chosen before women like me.

the other day i was on a social media site (that isn’t tumblr) and a straight woman made a post about how she felt included and wanted to be a good ally but felt left out and worried that she’d be “ruining the gay atmosphere” or what have you by being in gay social circles and being straight. lots of gay men responded with things like “you belong here!!!” and “we’ll take care of you!”

and man, i couldn’t help but feel a little burned. i know the idea that straight women and gay men get along famously (because of their “shared” love of men) is in large part a big heterosexual scam by the media to make straight women more accepting towards gay culture, but i really do see things like this happen sometimes and it can really fucking sting

i mean, i would imagine any lesbian, bi, or trans woman being passed over in favor of the company of cishet women would be hurt because we’re actually a PART of the lgbt community, and that’s an obvious factor here – but the thing that really hurts is how gay men so rarely consider our feelings about the matter anyways.

i think a lot of gay and bisexual men don’t understand the complex relationship between lgbt women and straight cis women. i don’t think they understand that our relationships with cishet women can absolutely be as traumatizing as their relationships with cishet men.

this cishet woman came into a gay space to wax poetic about being an ally and how she worried she didn’t belong – and all i could think of was the hundreds of times i’ve been in HER spaces feeling like i didn’t belong. and spaces for cishet women are everywhere – i feel out of place at the hair salon and the clothing store and the mall and the straight bar and the movie theaters full of straight movies.

for lgbt women cishet women are our mothers, sisters, aunts, grandmothers, and even children. we have spent our whole lives carrying the weight of knowing we are not like them. i don’t even think it’s entirely the fault of gay & bisexual men that they don’t understand the depth of our oppression or our experiences with cishet women and the damage it’s done to our womanhood – there isn’t a lot of media that has bothered to explore it. the average person doesn’t understand the volumes of unspoken pain cishet women have caused lgbt women, even if they are completely aware of the damage cishet men do

a part of me really believes that this behavior isn’t so much gay & bisexual men choosing to side with and throw their lot in with straight women as it is a fundamental lack of understanding of the women in their own community. and it hurts.

A Total Solar Eclipse Revealed Solar Storms 100 Years Before Satellites

Just days from now, on Aug. 21, 2017, the Moon will pass between the Sun and Earth, casting its shadow down on Earth and giving all of North America the chance to see a solar eclipse. Remember that it is never safe to look at the partially eclipsed or uneclipsed Sun, so make sure you use a solar filter or indirect viewing method if you plan to watch the eclipse.

Eclipses set the stage for historic science. Past eclipses enabled scientists to study the Sun’s structure, find the first proof of Einstein’s theory of general relativity, and discover the element helium — 30 years before it was found on Earth..

We’re taking advantage of the Aug. 21 eclipse by funding 11 ground-based scientific studies. As our scientists prepare their experiments for next week, we’re looking back to an historic 1860 total solar eclipse, which many think gave humanity our first glimpse of solar storms — called coronal mass ejections — 100 years before scientists first understood what they were.  

Coronal mass ejections, or CMEs, are massive eruptions made up of hot gas, plasma and magnetic fields. Bursting from the Sun’s surface, these giant clouds of solar material speed into space up to a million miles per hour and carry enough energy to power the world for 10,000 years if we could harness it. Sometimes, when they’re directed towards Earth, CMEs can affect Earth’s space environment, creating space weather: including triggering auroras, affecting satellites, and – in extreme cases – even straining power grids.

Scientists observed these eruptions in the 1970s during the beginning of the modern satellite era, when satellites in space were able to capture thousands of images of solar activity that had never been seen before.

But in hindsight, scientists realized their satellite images might not be the first record of these solar storms. Hand-drawn records of an 1860 total solar eclipse bore surprising resemblance to these groundbreaking satellite images.

On July 18, 1860, the Moon’s shadow swept across North America, Spain and North Africa. Because it passed over so much populated land, this eclipse was particularly well-observed, resulting in a wealth of scientific observations.  

Drawings from across the path of the 1860 eclipse show large, white finger-like projections in the Sun’s atmosphere—called the corona—as well as a distinctive, bubble-shaped structure. But the observations weren’t uniform – only about two-thirds of the 1860 eclipse sketches showed this bubble, setting off heated debate about what this feature could have been.

Sketches from the total solar eclipse of July 1860.

One hundred years later, with the onset of space-based satellite imagery, scientists got another piece of the puzzle. Those illustrations from the 1860 eclipse looked very similar to satellite imagery showing CMEs – meaning 1860 may have been humanity’s first glimpse at these solar storms, even though we didn’t understand what we were seeing.

While satellites provide most of the data for CME research, total solar eclipses seen from the ground still play an important role in understanding our star. During an eclipse, observers on the ground are treated to unique views of the innermost corona, the region of the solar atmosphere that triggers CMEs.

This region of the Sun’s atmosphere can’t be measured at any other time, since human-made instruments that create artificial eclipses must block out much of the Sun’s atmosphere—as well as its bright face—in order to produce clear images. Yet scientists think this important region is responsible for accelerating CMEs, as well as heating the entire corona to extraordinarily high temperatures.

When the path of an eclipse falls on land, scientists take advantage of these rare chances to collect unique data. With each new total solar eclipse, there’s the possibility of new information and research—and maybe, the chance to reveal something as astronomical as the first solar storm.

Learn all about the Aug. 21 eclipse at eclipse2017.nasa.gov, and follow @NASASun on Twitter and NASA Sun Science on Facebook for more. Watch the eclipse through the eyes of NASA at nasa.gov/eclipselive starting at 12 PM ET on Aug. 21.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

And honestly to white people making fun of poc for being terrified of Trump being president, to white people who say shit like “racism is over”, or when confronted with racism say “I don’t see race/color”, like fuck you. Just because racism never affected you doesn’t mean you ever had a right to tell us that our experiences are invalid or undermine our fears of trump becoming president. People are literally marching in the streets telling us that we don’t belong in this country, that the color of our skin or our religion offends them so much that they want us dead. And for any white person who’s gonna try to say this is “freedom of speech” or equate this to blm or the women’s march then just fuck of …please. People of color and jewish people have every right to be terrified at this moment, don’t try to invalidate our fears.

PSA

Allosexual = Person that does not ID as ace-spec

Alloromantic = Person that does not ID as aro-spec

IOW, they assume nothing about anyone’s sexuality or romantic life, they only assume a person does not ID on the ace or aro spectrum.

That’s it, that’s all, the end.

They harm literally no one.

#BoostAceVoices #BoostAroVoices

why some teens believe everything the light of their internet-capable device touches is their kingdom

(‘what about that shadowy place over there?’

‘that’s pornhub, simba. you must never go there.’)

we all see plenty of posts about how adults on the internet need to remember that ‘kids’ (read: teens) are around and we must bear that in mind. and these posts are not entirely without merit. It’s important to keep conversations being held with teens carefully teen-friendly and appropriately distant. but the entirety of tumblr and twitter aren’t designed to cater to the safety of minors, and all the adult self-policing in the world won’t make all the kid-unfriendly content go away.

not all teens believe the internet should have gutter bumpers for them, either. but those that do have mystified me for a while … until I started to understand just how pervasive ‘helicopter parenting’ is in parts of American (and UK) culture, and how that affects the adolescents and young adults of today.

anonymous asked:

a thing worth noting re anyone who pulls the ‘you can’t blacklist on mobile, minors can still see it’ thing to say even tagged content isn’t okay: even if washboard didn’t exist, the tumblr app is rated 17/18+ in app stores. if people under that age get on the app and see things they shouldn’t, that’s on them and their parents/guardians, because they shouldn’t actually have been using the app in the first place.

agreed.

Honestly, though, the argument has moved past this in some ways. It’s not so much about whether or not teenagers are allowed to see this thing or that thing; it’s a well-known fact that most teenagers will break rules if it suits them and they can get away with it, and internet time is a prime space wherein they can do so.

What’s happened is that some adolescents - teens with parents that are overly protective and crowd their schedules with supervised activities, usually - have been taught by their life experience that:

  • all adults in their vicinity are there to protect them. and no wonder: the large majority of their contact with adults will have been as supervisors. Teachers, teacher assistants, instructors, daycare employees, and coaches are all adults who are paid to watch their activity and will be held responsible for the teen’s wellbeing by their guardians. when have they ever spent time with adults who aren’t in charge of making sure they’re safe?
  • any space they are in will be designed and maintained with their safety and comfort in mind (no matter how they obtained access). all spaces they enter are specifically meant to revolve around them: schools, sports, playgrounds, etc. The few occasions that they have to enter spaces not meant specifically for them (stores, etc) they are closely watched by adults and any harm they experience will be blamed on adults as a result.
  • if they can get access, it must be a space that’s safe for them. Having spent very little of their lives unsupervised, they have always been actively prevented from entering spaces that are not meant for them. They’ve never had to learn to set boundaries for themselves, so they naturally reason that if a boundary is not actively enforced, it must actually be a space they’re meant to enter.
  • they are not responsible for themselves. adults around them are responsible for them. if they come to harm, it’s because an adult wasn’t doing their job properly.

for teens of this mindset, ‘18+ ONLY’ warnings are merely a suggestion. Nobody is stopping them, after all, and it has never been their job to stop themselves. and if they can get access, the space is now theirs - because all spaces they are in are theirs. they couldn’t get there unless it was meant for them; that’s how it works, right?

This is why some teens are utterly flabbergasted by the idea that adults on the internet want to interact with fellow adults on an adult level in a space the teen can access. They’re here! That means the space is specifically meant to cater to them! The adults are automatically tasked with their safety! If teens do get into trouble, it’s because the adults weren’t responsible enough! that’s how this has always worked.

And when adults say ‘no, I do not take responsibility for your actions, the internet is full of things that may frighten or harm you and you must set your own boundaries,’ it’s distressing and scary all at once.

(no wonder so many people in their late teens/early 20′s want to still be considered as children.)

EDIT (10/9/2017, 4 days after originally posting): if you’re seeing this post in its original form, I hope you’ll read some of the excellent reblogs disagreeing with it. I think that this post kind of misses the point, which is: some of it may be emotionally invaded teens, but some is just that teens who grew up around this kind of behavior from their parents and adults have learned that they can use their minor status as a kind of power play and thus stand up to demand coddling in fandom spaces.

the culprit that I still maintain is the heart of the problem is the structure of sites like tumblr and twitter, which knocked down all barriers and moderation in fandom and made fandom feel chaotic and uncontrollable. we’re all looking for ways to control our experience in an environment of this kind; some find it by demanding others change what they produce, and others do it by curating what what they see of the production of others. this post doesn’t reflect that well, however, and I apologize for talking down to teenagers who have the agency to think for themselves no matter how their parents behaved. 

The History of the Photoelectric Effect

In 1905, Albert Einstein gained world fame for supposedly being the first to propose that light has a nature of both a wave and a particle. This theory lead to the development of “photons,” or photo-electrons, which describe light with a wave-particle duality. In 1921, Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his theoretical physics and his explanation of the photoelectric effect. A theory that even today is still accepted as a certainty.

In 1887, Heinrich Hertz discovered the photoelectric effect, but it is a fact that Nikola Tesla was the first to explain the effect. Einstein was a very intelligent scientist, but he lacked wisdom. Unlike Einstein, Nikola Tesla wasn’t just a theoretical physicist who based all his theories off other scientists’ work (like James Clerk Maxwell and Heinrich Hertz), but was an experimental physicist as well, who based all his theories off experimental research and data from which he himself conducted and recorded.

In 1896, with experiments with radiant energy and high-vacuum tubes, Nikola Tesla was the first to publicize that light had both particle-like and wave-like properties–predating Einstein and other quantum physicists by nine years. With his high-vacuum tubes, or cathode ray tubes, Tesla shot cathode rays at different metals noting the differences in reflection the streams made upon the metals. Initially, he noticed the streams, being shot at the metals like bullets, broke into smaller particles, and or, vibrations of extremely high frequencies (technically, this would be the first demonstration of breaking electrons into subatomic particles), but upon further investigation he proved that they were indeed just waves. This lead to his conclusion that light is merely a transverse, longitudinal disturbance in the ether, involving alternate compressions and rarefactions, or in his words, "light can be nothing else than a sound wave in the ether.” Tesla would go on to file a patent based off these experiments titled, “Apparatus of the Utilization of Radiant Energy,” published in 1901.

Tesla’s conclusions would obviously get ignored by main stream science, but it seems that today’s technology, which seemingly works off Albert Einstein’s theories, are in reality, working off Tesla’s.

We are not simply the sum of our life experiences – we are fundamentally who we choose to be. While it is true that every person we have met and every place we have been has played their part in shaping who we are – it is us and us alone that decides how we allow them to shape us. That is what defines us… because life will bring great pain and sadness, that is one of its only certainties… but it also has the potential for so much love and happiness if you keep your heart open to others despite your pain.
I have been hurt. I have been hurt more times than I can count in ways you cannot even imagine, and yet the only hate I have within me is of the notion of inflicting what I have experienced onto someone else… the only spite I am capable of is to carry on peacefully in spite of all that has befallen me. The energy we hold within us flows through our bodies and out of our fingertips like tendrils into all that surrounds us… We can choose to spread love or we can choose to spread pain… The pain I bury. I bury it deep within me where I know it can never hurt another and feel content in the knowledge that when I die – it dies with me; I never passed it on to someone else because I knew exactly how it felt and could not bear the thought of another person ever feeling it. And it is love that gives me that strength. It is love that enables me to control my pain and give only my love to others…
And if love can keep pain like that under control… then surely love is the greater force.
little archaeology things
  • this stratigraphy is sexy
  • fucking piece of fucking mortar bullshit fuck
  • who decided to keep this tiny ass piece of glass for us to label?? this is a direct challenge to my skillset and i WILL label it
  • is this bone, pottery or a rock
  • lick it just lick it man
  • it’s a rock dude
  • also, who fucking included all this rock in the artifact bin?? 
  • FUCK THE HARRIS MATRIX 
  • i know exactly what lot this stain of dirt on my pants came from
  • who stole my trowel
  • i think i can draw a profile of the layers of dirt on my arms
  • who keeps messing with my level line we’re drawing the profile here dude
  • staying up until 2am writing a field report and drinking with the lads
  • staying up until 5am writing a field report and just pounding lukewarm coffee
  • guys look at this pottery piece i found its so pretty
  • BONE
  • WORM
  • drink enough water guys/take a fucking sip babes/ cracking open a cold one with the lads 
  • calling each other lads
  • bonding over how much we hate the field report and harris matrix
  • getting really excited about artifacts we find
  • dude that’s a beautiful piece of pottery/button/buckle/bone shard!
  • bonding over how much we fucking hate all the damn ass forged iron nails we find
  • is it sandy loam or loamy sand
  • is this 10YR 4/3 or 10YR 4/2 ? 
  • “hey professor is this anything?” “oh yeah man that’s an indian sex stone” “really?” “no its another damn rock”
  • where the hell is that elevation point again?
  • random song singalongs 

Another thing about the “acecourse” is that it doesn’t only stop aroace people from entering the LGBTQ+ community, it also completely destroys all chances for us to build a separate community (which many of y'all have told us that we should).

The acecourse, exclusionists, and other types of aphobes and similar, actively stop us from talking about issues affecting us. Some examples of this is “aphobia isn’t real”, “that doesn’t actually happen to ace people”, and “minors can’t be ace”/“asexuality is a modifier, not a sexual orientation”. Some of y'all go as far as hunting down kids posting selfies and making stimboards etc for their sexuality.

Many ace people, myself included, completely stopped talking about being ace, stopped sharing problems and experiences, and stopped reaching out to help questioning youth etc. It was only recently that I was able to stand up again and be proud of being asexual, something you people have beaten out of most of us during the past few years. You have ingrained fear and shame into an entire group of people. Let that sink in.

How are we to develop and grow as a community (in the LGBTQ+ or separate), as people, and in our terminology and identities, when you people continuously keep on invalidating our experiences, changing the meaning of our terminology, and attacking us (especially kids) for expressing ourselves through art, jokes, labels, and just sharing experiences?