our childhoods

when millennials were first heading into high school and college there was a huge trend in news stories about how stressed out our kids are, how their backs are getting messed up from carrying so many books, how they’re sleeping less and doing more school work, and how we should do more to help our kids have the childhoods we had because our kids are falling apart from stress and being forced to be more productive than kids should be. but then once millennials started hitting the workforce all the news was about how millennials are lazy and narcissistic and entitled lmao you were real concerned about us until you found out a 23 year old is more qualified to do your job than you

“Feminists are taking over Ghostbusters!”, men say. “They’re ruining our childhood!”

Meanwhile little girls everywhere can no longer safely Google My Little Pony.

I recently saw a video of a young woman talking about all of the reasons our generation, the Millennials, sucks and that’s she’s sorry for what we’ve become. Here is my, a fellow Millennial, response:

You say we’re just ‘existing’ and not ‘contributing anything to society.’ The oldest Millennial is 34, the youngest is 12, we haven’t had time to contribute anything yet. We’re trying to survive in a world that no other generation has had to grow up in, with a tanked economy and most of our childhood hearing nothing but war in the Middle East on the news while also being profoundly connected. We didn’t do that.

You say we’re no longer polite, we don’t say ‘no, sir’ or ‘no ma’am’ anymore and we no longer hold the door open for our elders or women. We also don’t expect low-paid workers to break their backs for us, or at yell at them when they make a mistake, like my 60-year-old grandfather does. We say ‘no problem’ when there’s a mistake in order, and politely stand by while the 40-something-year-old soccer mom huffs and rolls her eyes as the new girl struggles to punch in the correct code.

You say our music objectifies women and glorifies drugs and criminals. There has been no significant change from the songs that were once sung or the singers who sang them. Many of the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s performers were drug addicts, womanizers, and criminals in their own right. Elvis Presley was child abuser, John Lennon raped his many girlfriends and most of the music I grew up listening, which was 80’s rock, were performed by habitual drug abusers. Let’s not pretend like human nature took a drastic turn when 1983 rolled around.

You say we cuss to prove a point. We, as a generation, have learned it’s not the words we fucking use, it’s the passion in them that we care about. As a generation, we’ve become more interested in politics and the world around us, cursing is minor problem when we consider the political climate the older generation has plunged us into.

You say we use ‘bae’ to describe the ones we love. Bae, originally, means ‘before anyone else’ which is incredibly romantic in my opinion. Bae is also hardly ever taken seriously, it’s a jokey way to talk about someone you love. Language changes, I doubt people were happy when we changed ‘wherefore’ into ‘why.’ The greatest injustice we can do to our language and culture is not allow it to evolve and grow with us.

You say we idolize people like Kim Kardashian and shame people like Tim Tebow. Kim Kardashian is a business woman who had a private video she made with a lover illegally revealed. Instead of fading into obscurity, she stood tall and did not let the sexual shaming she endured stop her and now runs a multi-million dollar industry, is married to one of the richest men in the world, and had two beautiful children. Tim Tebow is a Christian who was criticized by a few people for praying in an open stadium while most people just wanted to see a game.

You say we’re lazy and entitled, we want to make a lot of money and get a free education but we’re not willing to put in the work. We are not lazy. I cannot tell you how many people I meet who have gone to school full time while working a part or even full-time job just to make ends meet. We’re not entitled, we’re bitter. In the 70’s, you could work a part time job over the summer and pay your way through four years of school because tuition was $400, now just to walk in the door of your local community college you need to drop $14,000. We have kids who aren’t even old enough to drink, yet are already $20,000 deep in debt. Debt that won’t go away because even filing for bankruptcy won’t erase it. And even with that education, there’s no guarantee you’ll find something in your field. I have a friend who has a degree in microbiology and she’s making $9 an hour selling $15 candles. I have another friend who has a masters in Sport Psychology and Counseling. She’s a bartender. My parents bought a three bedroom house in the suburbs in the late 90’s while my generation is imagining apartments with breezy windows and trying to get enough money to get food while we scrounge up less than $8 a week.

You say we spend more time online making friends and less time building relationships and our relationship’s appearance on Facebook is more important than building the foundation that relationship is based on. We are a generation that is profoundly connected and no other generation has seen this before. We have more opportunities to meet people from all over the world and better chances to understand other worldviews and lifestyles. Being able to stay home and talk to people over the internet is cheaper and more relaxing than having to force yourself to interact with people in public settings after a long day of minimum wage labor. The people I talk to more over the internet are people I have been friends with for years. It’s easier to talk about the day’s events over Skype or Facebook Messenger than arrange a day to meet in person when you have conflicting schedules. I truly don’t believe most people care what others think of their friendship or how their relationships ‘look’ on social media. Most often what you are calling ‘our relationship’s appearance on Facebook’ are documented and searchable memories.

You say our idea of what we believe in is going on Facebook and posting a status on Facebook. Not everyone can join in with the crowds of protesters. It’s easy to see what others have to say through the comments and argue back without the threat of violence. And when this generation does organize events to stand up for ourselves, it’s met with childish name-calling or being reduced to a ‘riot.’

You say we believe the number of follows we have reflects who we are as a person. It’s nice knowing there’s 20 or 50 or maybe even 100 people who care what you have to say or think. We live in an age where we can and will be heard.

You say we don’t respect our elders, that we don’t respect our country. Our elders grew up in one of the greatest economic booms in history and in turn made it the worst economic situation since the 1930’s all while blaming kids who were only five at the time for it. We stand on our flag because it means nothing, it’s a pretty banner for an ugly lie. We’re a country that says you can make it if you just work hard enough while, in the end, that will almost never happen. We’re a country that becomes irate at the idea of 20-something college kids standing on some canvas dyed red, white, and blue but seem to shrug off the millions of homeless, disabled veterans.

You say we’re more divided than ever before. Ever before what? When black folk couldn’t drink from the same fountain as white folk? When women couldn’t vote? When white southerners fought for the idea that they could keep black people as slaves? We’re a generation that is done with injustice and when you fight for social change, you will divide people.

You say everything that was frowned up is celebrated. What does that mean? We frowned up gay marriage. We frowned upon wives being able to say no to sex with their husbands. We frowned up interracial marriage. We frowned up black folk being allowed to go to school with white folk. We frowned upon women being allowed to vote. Are those things not worth celebrating?

You say nothing has value in our generation, that we take advantage of everything. We value friendship more, we value the fists of change, we value social justice and family and the right to marry those we love. We value the right to be yourself, wholly and fully. We value the right to choose and we value the idea of fighting what you believe in, even when everyone older than you is telling you you’re what’s wrong with the country.

You say we have more opportunities to succeed than those before but we don’t ‘appreciate’ them. We are a bitter generation. You can finance a boat for 3.9% but you have to pay back college tuition plus 8.9%. We may have more opportunities but those opportunities cost money we don’t have.

You say you can see why we’re called ‘Generation,’ but we’re not Generation Y, we’re Millennials and we do feel entitled. We were promised a strong economy and inexpensive education. We had the world in our hands and we were going to make it better. And it was ripped away from us because of incompetent rulers, illegal wars, and greedy corporations and we get blamed for it. Crime has gone down, abortion and unintended pregnancy has lowered, people are living longer, people are more educated, people are less likely to die from violent crime or diseases, yet my generation is touted as the worst generation and for what? Crimes that we’re accused of that happened before we could even wipe our own ass? We were raised better, and we were raised in a society that treated, and continues to treat, us like garbage. And we are done. We are not sorry, we did nothing wrong.

“Emotionally abusive or manipulative parents often make a practice of constantly questioning their child’s reality and experiences. Our childhoods were full of moments of being told that problematic parental behavior “never happened,” that a problem our parent created doesn’t matter because they “did the best they could,” or that an event that traumatized us “didn’t happen like that.” -Gabrielle Moss (Why You Shouldn’t Feel Bad About Not Talking to Your Toxic Parent)

So let me get this straight:

-Samurai Jack has come back to television 13 years after it ended in 2004

-Ducktales is getting a reboot which will air this summer (it looks awesome by the way)

-A spiritual successor to Banjo-Kazooie, Yooka-Laylee, is coming in April

-The new Power Rangers Movie is coming on March 24

-MST3K is being revived

-Captain Underpants will be getting a movie

-Also Parappa the Rapper will be re-released remastered the beginning of next month

-Same with Patapon and Loco Roco at a later date

-Not to mention that the first three games of Crash Bandicoot is getting the remastered treatment

-It was recently announced that Invader Zim is coming back to TV

-Rocko’s Modern Life will return with a special next year

-Animaniacs is getting rebooted with Steven Spielberg being involved in the project

-And Hey Arnold will return in the fall

People, I think 2017 is going to be considered the year where our childhood comes back to us.

“My mother wasn’t the best person in the world.  She was hooked on heroin for most of my life.  She sold our childhood home for drug money.  She left me alone to raise my brother and disabled nephew.  I used to wake up every night to feed him and change his diapers.  I supported us all on the $5.15 an hour that I earned from the grocery store.  My mother passed away a few months ago, and I think I’m just now coming to terms with how awful she made my life.  This is the most stable I’ve ever been.  I have a permanent address.  I have someone who legitimately loves me.  But my anxiety has never been worse.  I’ve been having panic attacks recently.  I think I’ve never had to deal with the trauma because things were always coming at me.  And now I’m not sure how to handle the quiet.”

When I go see Beauty and the Beast today...
  • Me: (holing my ticket outside the theater) I want adventure in the great wide somewhere...
  • 6 year old behind me: Excuse me.
  • Me: (more dramatic)I want it more than I can tell!
  • 6 year old: Lady come on, could you move?
  • Me: And for once it might be grand, to have someone understand....
  • 6 year old now pushing by: Freak

i almost took you to a park and we almost sat under a blue sky and talked about our childhood memories. we almost lay next to each other and ate strawberries and made puns. we almost spent most of the day just looking at each other and blowing dandelion seeds and talking about if we’d be good at herbology in hogwarts. we almost watched clouds until the sun went down. i almost kissed you only when it was quiet, my hands shaking, standing on your doorstep. i almost met your dad as your girlfriend. we almost go to holidays together wearing matching sweaters. on thursdays we eat pasta and on fridays we eat fries with honey. i  almost show you the parts of me that are put into my attic. i help you clean the parts of you that are bleeding. we feed each other cake with our fingers and drink wine out of bottles and play loud music to clean. almost. almost. it’s just that it rained today. it’s just that i never get the nerve up to ask you to stay.

Ya know what’s sad? 


That we were the generation that was fortunate enough to grow up with AMAZING shows with AMAZING characters that we could look up to.

Originally posted by zeroraws

These characters weren’t grown ups. 

Originally posted by mtv

There was no corny humor.

Originally posted by luciddrreaming

 Okay, a tiny bit.

 But we were provided with well thought-out scripts, with excellent stories that had great casting from kids that loved to act and were passionate about what they did. 

Originally posted by teendotcom

Also, they didn’t just play their part, they became that character that still lives on in our hearts to this day from our childhood, and I’m thankful for that. 

Originally posted by disneychannel2000

I want kids to grow up with shows and movies that can inspire them to create-to want to become those characters when they’re outside playing with their friends or writing a story that can come from that world. 

Originally posted by peteneems

For the kids to inspired and to be grateful for the hard work those people did to create a show that helped them get through school, or a hard time in their life. 

Originally posted by butchhartman

Because maybe one day, one of those kids will make a story, and it will be because of those characters that they grew up with, that contributed to creating a new story to tell to a new generation of kids, yearning to hear, look and listen to what the world has to provide to them. 

That’s just how amazing these shows can be. 

Originally posted by fuckyeahnineteennineties

My sister and I grew up without extended family nearby, but we had these two bachelor cats who kind of took on that role for us.  We like to say that they were our gay uncles.  I finally drew them as the humans they were to us … 

The truth is that I’m afraid to dive into someone new. How can I not be? I’m still emptying my lungs from the last time I fell into someone’s waters and explored the depths of them. It’ll be years before I’m done wringing the wetness out of my hair, before I stop smelling the salt of their oceans on my skin. Learning someone new is frightening now. It’s not the adventure it was before. I’m no longer bitter for my heartbreak. My reluctance isn’t a decision I made with a sour mouth. I’m just exhausted by the idea of feeling for someone new. Of treading water with small talk and stories about our childhoods. When I think of him, I am afraid of sinking so deeply into someone again that I am lost to them. In that, I realize I am most afraid that I won’t sink at all. That I’ll always be treading water with anyone that isn’t him. That anyone after him will only know how to meet me at the surface.
—  pardis alia.
9

“It was a challenge, because we wanted to take what was absolute, 100 percent accurate for the period and kind of turn up the volume on it, and amplify it. In part that was to get a freshness, a crispness, a contemporary vibrancy, but also to depict it in the way kids see it. We were talking about how, in our own childhoods, you see everything as bigger, as more colorful then it actually kind of was. You’re seeing [the times] through the kids’ eyes.” 

-  Jeriana San Juan  (co-custume designer for The Get Down) (x)

the Batfamily in the McDonalds Drive Thru

it would be a fucking mess. Picture them, crammed into the back of some luxury minivan Bruce picked up:

Damian, cranky, in the backseat. “I don’t understand why we have to consume processed fats, it’s horrendously unhealthy.”

Tim: “Your face is horrendously unhealthy. Also, Bruce, can I get like, three frappes?”

Dick: “Can I have a happy meal?”

Jason: “You’re literally 25. Why the hell do you want a kid’s meal?”

Dick: “Some of us want to remember our childhoods–oh. Oh, Jay, I didn’t mea–”

Jason: “No, no, no. Continue. You were gonna say some of us want to remember our childhoods, right? Well mine was cut short on account of me dying–”

Tim: “Damian, give it back!”

Damian: “It’s a pen, what use do you have for it?”

Tim: “It’s not a pen, it’s a laser box cutter!”

Stephanie: “When did you have time to make a laser box cutter?”

Tim: “Last night–”

Stephanie: “You told me you went to bed.”

Tim: “I did say that, didn’t I?”

Cassandra: “I would like apple slices, please.”

Bruce: *turns to Alfred with wide eyes* 

Bruce: “Everyone’s getting chicken nuggets. I don’t care if they complain. Hello? Yes? 17 6-piece chicken nugget meals please. Yes, I’m serious, 17–”