our century

anonymous asked:

The brothers realizing the women in our centuries have different clothes than their women. Instead of wearing pants while fighting as a Viking, but women wearing them all the time. Or having shorter skirts than back then. I could imagine the brothers looking or feeling up their skirts more than they did before.

Hvitserk and Ivar would deff get a slap or two for that. Ubbe I think would appreciate the view xD 

anonymous asked:

i am a heterophobe lol. i spread the gospel truth about the evil heterosexuals, the heterosexuals have invaded our gay lands for centuries, spread their propaganda in all of our medias, made korrasami and captain flint hetero but NO MORE. thanks to your blog! lmao girl you have a beautiful brain.

and today they tried to convince everyone suran’s new mv isn’t gay.. they really want to take everything from lgbt.. why..

Dear non-natives

The Plains warbonnet is not a Cherokee thing. It is not a Navajo thing. It is not an Indian thing. It is a Plains thing.

Stop calling every silly thing you draw that even vaguely resembles a native “Cherokee” or “Navajo” or “Aztec.”

Stop drawing the warbonnet everywhere as the apparently definitive native thing. It isn’t part of all of our 600+ cultures.

Same goes for the tipi, not part of every one of the 600+ indigenous cultures.

Stop thinking that if a native person doesn’t have dark, “mahogany” skin, that their heritage is invalid. Even without admixture, we actually do have varying skin tones.

Stop wearing crappy fake warbonnets.

Stop wearing redface.

Stop using us as your silly mascots. We are people.

Stop saying “spirit animal.” It’s derived from a New Age bastardization of a something that actually exists in some of our cultures.

Don’t smudge. Cleanse all you like, that’s fine, but don’t smudge.

Don’t call us “Indians.” “Native American” isn’t great either, it is not our name, but it’s slightly better than “Indian.” “Indigenous” is also fine.

Don’t use NDN/ndn. That is ours.

Step off about our hair. If you meet a long-haired native, admire it if you like, maybe even ask them about it (RESPECTFULLY), but do not touch. The same applies for someone with short hair, but additionally for those with short hair, don’t say things like “oh you’d look more native/Indian/etc if your hair was long.” We didn’t all traditionally have long, flowing hair. Believe it or not, there are actually different haircuts existing in our various cultures, and aside from that ultimately it’s a personal choice, one does not need to have long hair if they don’t want to. Doesn’t make them any less native to have short hair.

Don’t pray to our spirits/gods/energies. Native spiritualities are closed, they are not for outsiders.

Don’t say “The Native Americans believed…” Firstly, the past tense is silly, we still exist and do things. Secondly, we are NOT A MONOLITH. As I mentioned before, there are upwards of 600 different Native American cultures.

Don’t ask about someone’s “Indian name.” That’s not only insensitive, the name you are referring to in that instance is something sacred, and might not be something that person wants to share with you.

Don’t call yourself silly crap like “howling wolf” or “flying eagle.” That’s also racist and insensitive.

Regardless of whatever you might think you’re doing, or what your intentions may be, if a native person tells you that what you’re doing is disrespectful, STOP DOING IT.

You aren’t honoring us. You’re just mocking us further, demonstrating your continued ability to treat us like shit and get away with it even now, centuries after our colonization began. Your feelings are not more important than our history and survival.

To those doing your best as allies, thank you, keep doing what you do. HOWEVER, don’t let opportunities to educate others escape you. By letting them continue to be ignorant, you are failing. Spread the message.

There will be no “please.” It’s been more than 500 years, and we still are made to be invisible in our homelands. Still we are treated like less. Some even think we all died long ago.

We are still here

We will still be here

Treat us with respect.

There’s usually some stigma that the novels published in our current century aren’t as literary & thought-provoking than previous centuries’ novels. Here are some novels published from 2001-Present that are incredibly literary/outstanding!! Feel free to add on & enjoy!!

MAINSTREAM / WELL-KNOWN (these novels can also be critically acclaimed)

  • The Book Thief by Markus Zusak 
  • The Fault in Our Stars by John Green 
  • The Help by Kathryn Stockett 
  • Life of Pi by Yann Martel 
  • Room by Emma Donoghue
  • Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert
  • Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
  • Thriteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
  • Me Before you by Jojo Moyes
  • The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
  • The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

FICTION YOU MAY HAVE MISSED

  • A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled housseini
  • The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
  • The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
  • The Martian by Andy Weir
  • Atonement by Ian McEwan
  • The Road by Cormac McCarthy
  • Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen
  • Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
  • Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami
  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
  • All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
  • My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
  • Everything is Illuminated by Johnathan Foer
  • The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

LITERARY FICTION / CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED

  • The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
  • The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd
  • The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
  • The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
  • The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
  • The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
  • The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz

SERIES

  • The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling
  • The Hunger Games Series by Suzanne Collins
  • The Twilight Series
  • The Game of Thrones Series
  • The Divergent Series
  • The Percy Jackson Series
  • TheHeroes of Olympus Series
  • The American Gods Series

OTHER RESOURCES:

10

For centuries our families fought together against their common enemy. Despite their differences, together. We need to do the same if we’re going to survive – because the enemy is real. It’s always been real.

10

for centuries our families fought together,
against their common enemy. 
despite their differences. together. 
we need to do the same if we’re gonna survive. 
because the enemy is real.

anonymous asked:

I often have ideas for a scene or a character but there is no plot. How can I expand these ideas into stories? I just don't know what to do with my ideas to get a story out of them. Most plotting tips require that I know at least the beginning and the end of my story. But I don't even have that.

Hi Anonymous,

I’ve heard of other writers having this same problem, so you are not alone! Here are some ideas that come to mind when I think about this.

Coming up with a Plot (from scratch)

First off, you have ideas for characters or scenes, and that’s a starting point, and you probably (I’m assuming, because it wasn’t that long ago) saw my post, What to Outline When Starting a Story, which can give some guidance on what to consider. However, if you have no idea where to even come up with a concept for your plot that post can only be so much help.

Conflict out of Story Elements

Since you have some ideas about character and scene, I’d try building off that. In some cases, you might need to flesh those out a bit more to continue (I don’t know, since I don’t know how much you have those figured out).New York Times best-selling author David Farland points out in his book Million Dollar Outlines that characters grow out of their setting. We are all influenced by our setting–where we live, where we spend our time, what century we’re part of, etc.

Setting –> Character

Farland goes on to say that out of character (and setting) comes conflict:

Setting + Character –> Conflict

Plot obviously comes from some sort of conflict, the character reacting to and trying to solve that conflict or conflicts. But let’s finish out the diagram/equation.

Setting –> Character –> Conflict –> Theme

How conflicts are dealt with in the story create the theme.

It should be noted though that this diagram may not be helpful to everyone, and it’s also possible to work backwards from it. For example, I personally don’t like the idea of starting with the setting–although, realistically, pretty much all stories start there, if only to the most basic degrees (time period, real world vs. fantasy world, Earth vs. space, etc.). I often like to start with character. But as you work on your character, at some point, you are going to be looking back at what kind of life he grew out of and where he came from, and where he is now. Other people may like to start with conflict, and work back into character and setting. So, it doesn’t have to be linear.

But let’s look at the conflict part. You need some form of conflict to have plot. As I mentioned a few weeks ago in my post Are Your Conflicts Significant? the conflict should either be broad (far-reaching) or personal to the character. If it’s not either, it’s probably not that significant. However, it should be noted that you can make almost any conflict broad, or personal.

But how do you even get to that point? If you like Farland’s diagram, what I would suggest would be looking at those characters and setting. Brainstorm conflicts by asking yourself questions.

  • What conflict can come out of this setting?

For example, in some stories, major conflicts come straight out of the setting. Most if not all dystopians, like The Hunger Games fall into this category. You can even look at movies like Interstellar, which deals largely with space travel. The major conflict came out of a setting (Earth will soon be inhabitable). In a fantasy story, conflicts can come out of the world and worldbuilding (setting), whether it’s the magic system or the world itself. In Lord of the Rings, the major conflicts often come from the setting (Frodo has to make it to Mount Doom) and magic (the One Ring is a magical object that must be destroyed). In historical fiction, it can come out of setting–what are some of the conflicts the world was dealing with during WWII?

But what about something more small-scale than Panem, outer space, and Middle-earth? Setting can play a role there too. What kind of conflicts can come out of attending high school in 2017? What conflicts might be present there? What conflicts might come out of trying to start a career as a woman centuries ago? The story doesn’t have to be epic for this sort of brainstorming to work.

Les Miserableis a good example of how setting can play into conflicts, whether it’s being a struggling young mother, a convict, or participating in politics.

  • What conflict can come out of this character?

Once you have your character, you can try brainstorming conflicts for her. Now, there are sort of two ways to approach this.

One, you look at your character–her personality, strengths, weaknesses–and ask yourself, what would this character want? Figuring out what your character wants is often vital to a good story. In some stories, it can be more simple, basic, or straightforward. Maybe your character just wants money. In other cases, it might be bigger. Maybe your character wants to defeat an evil ruler. It can be somewhat philosophical. Maybe your character dreams of ridding the universe of a false god, like in His Dark Materials.

When you know what your character wants, you can start brainstorming conflicts by considering what could stop her from getting what she wants. In Lord of the Rings, Frodo volunteers to destroy the Ring, but there are literal obstacles in his way. Space, for one thing. He has to travel for miles and miles and miles. Then there are other people and creatures: orcs, Shelob, Sauron, even his own companions–these people are in conflict with him. He has to deal with getting hurt, wounded, and fatigued. All these things are keeping Frodo from his goal. And of course, his ultimate want is to return to the Shire, but he has to destroy the Ring first.

If your character wants to be in a relationship with someone, there are obstacles too. Maybe the love interest doesn’t know he exists. Maybe there is a family feud, like in Romeo and Juliet. Maybe there is a love triangle. Whatever your character wants, you start brainstorming what could keep him from getting it.

A second approach to brainstorming conflicts with character is to look at your character and consider what kind of situations would be difficult for them, what would make them grow. In some cases, they might be the reluctant hero. Love him or hate him, as I mentioned a few weeks ago, Edward Cullen is a good example of this sort of thing. He’s a “vegetarian” vampire living his life, and then out of nowhere, a girl shows up that is basically his personal brand of cocaine. How is he supposed to deal with this? Worse. He has feelings for her. Immediately, Edward is in conflict.

Now, you can combine both methods. And in reality, both those examples have both. Sure, Frodo volunteered to take the Ring, but he was basically the only person who could. But look at him. He’s just a humble hobbit. He doesn’t do magic, he doesn’t know warfare, and he knows very little about the world. But he’s thrown into a situation where those characteristics will be tested. Similarly, Edward is thrown into a situation, but he ends up having wants too. He wants to be in a relationship with Bella. But the fact he is a vampire and she has potent blood is a conflict that impedes that.

So you can brainstorm conflicts from setting and character.

Plot out of Conflict Types

Let’s look at this another way.

There are five types of conflict.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Why do people always get mad when Black women only want to claim monoracial Black women? Black women are tired of being erased. How come other races of people are not expected to claim biracial people?

Because we’re not supposed to have autonomy over our own image. Because the world wants to mold black womanhood into what they think it should be and what it should look like. Every other group of people are allowed to practice self-preservation, but because the world (including the black community) sees our womanhood as a nuisance and deems our humanity a “mistake”, they literally do everything they can to try to erase us and to convince us that our image isn’t adequate unless we accept the versions of black womanhood that they have planned for us.

The fact that people honestly think that a black woman is supposed to allow the face of her womanhood, to be someone who only possesses half of her lineage, is asinine. And it is asinine, because like you said, no one else does that. Everyone else (including black males) understand the dynamic of race, interracial couplings, and their offsprings. Everyone else knows that the one drop rule is old, ignorant, and played out. Yet, whenever a black woman wants to create solidarity amongst other monoracial black women, it’s a problem? This shit is sinister, and it’s rooted in an ancient disdain for black women and all that we encompass.

They’ve been wanting to scribble out our image for centuries and replace it with more *ahem* “diluted” phenotypes.

Prime example (Trigger Warning):


That’s the reason why Rachel Dolezal, Rubia Black, and Martina Big can receive thousands of supporters (many from the black community), yet we can’t even get motherfuckers to care about the 64,000 REAL black women that are missing currently. Everyone loves our features. Everyone loves our bodies and our attitudes, our hair, our hips, asses, strength…just as long as it’s not actually on us. Hence the reason why any black woman that pushes back against her erasure gets met with vitriol.

Either black women can get their heads out the clouds and start practicing self-preservation, or before you know it, the only requirements you’ll need to be a black woman is a black great grandpa and some melanin shots. 

2

Newt Gingrich says America can’t “be multicultural and still be a single country”

  • Newt Gingrich went on Hannity Wednesday night to discuss the London attack. The discussion veered into America’s so-called “issues with refugees and migrants,” as host Sean Hannity described them.
  • Gingrich replied that Americans needed to get over the “mythology” that people from different cultures can coexist peacefully in the same country:
  • “[Part] of it is when people come here, we need to go back to teaching people how to be American — to assimilating them into an American civilization,” Gingrich said. “We absorb lots of people from lots of places. We can do it again, but part of that requires that we defeat this left-wing mythology that you can be multicultural and still be a single country.”
  • Gingrich assumes that there is one monolithic “American” culture — implying one centered on white Americans — that all others must conform to in order for the U.S to function properly.
    He frames the idea of different cultures living in harmony as a “myth” compounded by immigrants unwillingness to assimilate.
  • Yet it seems not to have occurred to Gingrich that maybe he is the problem, not immigrants. The U.S. has certainly had trouble getting people from different races to coexist peacefully. 
  • But most of that can be attributed to our centuries-long history of white supremacy. Read more (3/23/17 11 AM)

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