our century

Dear non-natives

The Plains warbonnet is not a Cherokee thing. It is not a Navajo thing. It is not an Indian thing. It is a Plains thing.

Stop calling every silly thing you draw that even vaguely resembles a native “Cherokee” or “Navajo” or “Aztec.”

Stop drawing the warbonnet everywhere as the apparently definitive native thing. It isn’t part of all of our 600+ cultures.

Same goes for the tipi, not part of every one of the 600+ indigenous cultures.

Stop thinking that if a native person doesn’t have dark, “mahogany” skin, that their heritage is invalid. Even without admixture, we actually do have varying skin tones.

Stop wearing crappy fake warbonnets.

Stop wearing redface.

Stop using us as your silly mascots. We are people.

Stop saying “spirit animal.” It’s derived from a New Age bastardization of a something that actually exists in some of our cultures.

Don’t smudge. Cleanse all you like, that’s fine, but don’t smudge.

Don’t call us “Indians.” “Native American” isn’t great either, it is not our name, but it’s slightly better than “Indian.” “Indigenous” is also fine.

Don’t use NDN/ndn. That is ours.

Step off about our hair. If you meet a long-haired native, admire it if you like, maybe even ask them about it (RESPECTFULLY), but do not touch. The same applies for someone with short hair, but additionally for those with short hair, don’t say things like “oh you’d look more native/Indian/etc if your hair was long.” We didn’t all traditionally have long, flowing hair. Believe it or not, there are actually different haircuts existing in our various cultures, and aside from that ultimately it’s a personal choice, one does not need to have long hair if they don’t want to. Doesn’t make them any less native to have short hair.

Don’t pray to our spirits/gods/energies. Native spiritualities are closed, they are not for outsiders.

Don’t say “The Native Americans believed…” Firstly, the past tense is silly, we still exist and do things. Secondly, we are NOT A MONOLITH. As I mentioned before, there are upwards of 600 different Native American cultures.

Don’t ask about someone’s “Indian name.” That’s not only insensitive, the name you are referring to in that instance is something sacred, and might not be something that person wants to share with you.

Don’t call yourself silly crap like “howling wolf” or “flying eagle.” That’s also racist and insensitive.

Regardless of whatever you might think you’re doing, or what your intentions may be, if a native person tells you that what you’re doing is disrespectful, STOP DOING IT.

You aren’t honoring us. You’re just mocking us further, demonstrating your continued ability to treat us like shit and get away with it even now, centuries after our colonization began. Your feelings are not more important than our history and survival.

To those doing your best as allies, thank you, keep doing what you do. HOWEVER, don’t let opportunities to educate others escape you. By letting them continue to be ignorant, you are failing. Spread the message.

There will be no “please.” It’s been more than 500 years, and we still are made to be invisible in our homelands. Still we are treated like less. Some even think we all died long ago.

We are still here

We will still be here

Treat us with respect.

There’s usually some stigma that the novels published in our current century aren’t as literary & thought-provoking than previous centuries’ novels. Here are some novels published from 2001-Present that are incredibly literary/outstanding!! Feel free to add on & enjoy!!

MAINSTREAM / WELL-KNOWN (these novels can also be critically acclaimed)

  • The Book Thief by Markus Zusak 
  • The Fault in Our Stars by John Green 
  • The Help by Kathryn Stockett 
  • Life of Pi by Yann Martel 
  • Room by Emma Donoghue
  • Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert
  • Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
  • Thriteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
  • Me Before you by Jojo Moyes
  • The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
  • The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

FICTION YOU MAY HAVE MISSED

  • A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled housseini
  • The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
  • The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
  • The Martian by Andy Weir
  • Atonement by Ian McEwan
  • The Road by Cormac McCarthy
  • Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen
  • Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
  • Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami
  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
  • All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
  • My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
  • Everything is Illuminated by Johnathan Foer
  • The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

LITERARY FICTION / CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED

  • The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
  • The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd
  • The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
  • The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
  • The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
  • The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
  • The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz

SERIES

  • The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling
  • The Hunger Games Series by Suzanne Collins
  • The Twilight Series
  • The Game of Thrones Series
  • The Divergent Series
  • The Percy Jackson Series
  • TheHeroes of Olympus Series
  • The American Gods Series

OTHER RESOURCES:

2

Newt Gingrich says America can’t “be multicultural and still be a single country”

  • Newt Gingrich went on Hannity Wednesday night to discuss the London attack. The discussion veered into America’s so-called “issues with refugees and migrants,” as host Sean Hannity described them.
  • Gingrich replied that Americans needed to get over the “mythology” that people from different cultures can coexist peacefully in the same country:
  • “[Part] of it is when people come here, we need to go back to teaching people how to be American — to assimilating them into an American civilization,” Gingrich said. “We absorb lots of people from lots of places. We can do it again, but part of that requires that we defeat this left-wing mythology that you can be multicultural and still be a single country.”
  • Gingrich assumes that there is one monolithic “American” culture — implying one centered on white Americans — that all others must conform to in order for the U.S to function properly.
    He frames the idea of different cultures living in harmony as a “myth” compounded by immigrants unwillingness to assimilate.
  • Yet it seems not to have occurred to Gingrich that maybe he is the problem, not immigrants. The U.S. has certainly had trouble getting people from different races to coexist peacefully. 
  • But most of that can be attributed to our centuries-long history of white supremacy. Read more (3/23/17 11 AM)

follow @the-movemnt

How do you measure a year?

Request: soulmate au- when you reach 18, you stop ageing until you meet your soulmate. 

Pairing: Anthony Ramos x reader

Warnings: mild angst

Word count: 2,797 

A/N: welcome to day one of the @hamwriters writeathon (aka AU time)! I’m posting a fic a day this week (woah) and I am so excited pls come and scream with me. endless thanks to @gratitudejoyandsorrow for proofreading and being awesome ^-^

schedule for the rest of this week here

@pearltheartist, @whitestorm547

1783

You celebrated your eighteenth birthday in seventeen eighty three. Your parents, ageing together for twenty years, looked on fondly as you accepted their gift- new writing supplies and a diary.

“Write about your life,” your father suggested. He had fought in the revolutionary war alongside Washington himself, meeting your mother when he had returned from to New York to begin his life anew.

“Thank you,” you told him. Your best friend Theodosia had already found her soulmate and, despite you being born before her, she now looked older.

You carefully signed your name on the inside cover. The ink shone on the page and you decided you would write a letter to your soulmate each and every day until you met them.

2015

You pushed your way through the streets of New York, shivering in the cold. Having invested your money well over the last two hundred and thirty years, you didn’t have to work full time, and could afford to spend your time in coffee shops, writing.

You were on your two hundredth journal. You always carried your first one and your latest one with you- the beginning and the end of your life, you reasoned. You had written over eighty-five thousand letters to your soulmate.

And you had never met them.

A couple of times you had tried to find someone else- someone who had lost their soulmate or who hadn’t found them yet either, but it never worked. If they had known their soulmate, you could never be enough.

You slipped into your current favourite coffee shop- a two story independent shop that was a stones throw away from Broadway. You wondered idly if there was a new show you could go and see, and decided to head over to take a look later.

There was a new barista at the counter. Her hair a golden-brown that caught the light as she chatted animatedly to her coworkers. You slid into your favourite seat - a cushy armchair by the window - and pulled out your journal.

You opened it to a fresh page and pulled out a pen and a paperclip. You wrote the date above the lines and fished around in your jacket pocket for a moment before finding your ticket to an art exhibition you had been to. You clipped it to the page and started to write.

Dear Soulmate,

New York is so different now- so busy, so tall, and so alive. It’s no longer the city I grew up in, but I suppose the world moves on even if I don’t.

There was an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art about soulmates - I saved my ticket. They had photos of people with their soulmates, dressed in the clothing of the era they were born in. The kind of thing they might have worn on their eighteenth birthday.

Couples from all over the world - every nationality, every gender, every sexuality. Little placards letting you know how long they’d waited for each other. People born during World War One - a horrible time - meeting their soulmates today.

It gave me hope that I might still find you.

You closed your journal as the waitress brought over your coffee, setting it down with a smile. You thanked her.

Over two centuries you had met people who had waited for their soulmates for just as long as you had. Many of them had watched their families die, as you had, and struggled to keep faith. Every one of them had found their soulmates eventually and promised you it was worth it.

So you waited.

Keep reading

You know that bit of DW fanart where Rose, Martha and Amy are wearing their Doctor’s outfits and Nine, Ten and Eleven are wearing their companion’s and Nine and Ten are laughing at an embarrassed Eleven because he is wearing a skirt. Does that not ring false to anyone? I honestly think Eleven would not mind wearing a skirt and that the other two wouldn’t laugh at him for it because why would that me funny someone who thinks our 21st century ideas about gender and fashion are silly. Someone should really do an alternative version where Eleven wears the skirt proudly and the other two are jealous of how good his legs are in it? Because we really need to destroy the idea that a man wearing feminine clothing is something to laugh at.  

Did Europeans “civilize” the Americas? Actually, anthropologists tell us that “hunters and gatherers were relatively peaceful, compared to agriculturalists, and that modern societies were more warlike still. Thus violence increases with civilization.


[…] Textbooks cannot resist contrasting "primitive” Americans with modern Europeans.


[…] Europeans persuaded Natives to specialize in the fur and slave trades. Native Americans were better hunters and trappers than Europeans, and with the guns the Europeans sold them, they became better still. Other Native skills began to atrophy.


[…] because whites “demanded institutions reflective of their own with which to relate,” many Native groups strengthened their tribal governments… New confederations and nations developed.. The tribes also became more male- dominated, in imitation of Europeans.. [there was] an escalation of Indian warfare… [the slave trade helped] to deagriculturize Native Americans. To avoid being targets for capture, Indians abandoned their cornfields and their villages.


[…] "Europeans did not “civilize” or “settle” roaming Indians, but had the opposite impact.


[…] According to Benjamin Franklin, “All their government is by Counsel of the Sages. There is no Force; there are no Prisons, no officers to compel Obedience, or inflict Punishment.” Probably foremost, the lack of hierarchy in the Native socieites in the eastern United States attracted the admiration of European observers. Frontiersmen were taken with the extent to which Native Americans enjoyed freedom as individuals. Women were also accorded more status and power.. than in white societies of the time.


[…] "Indeed, Native American ideas may be partly responsible for our democratic institutions. We have seen how Native ideas of liberty, fraternity, and equality found their way to Europe to influence social philosophers such as Thomas More, Locke, Montaigne, Montesquieu, and Rousseau… Through 150 years of colonial contact, the Iroquois League stood before the colonies as an object lesson in how to govern a large domain democratically.


[…] John Mohawk has argued that American Indians are directly or indirectly responsible for the public-meeting tradition, free speech, democracy, and “all those things which got attached to the Bill of Rights.” Without the Native example, “do you really believe that all those ideas would have found birth among a people who had spent a millennium butchering other people because of intolerance of questions of religion?”


[…] Indian warfare absorbed 80 percent of the entire federal budget during George Washington’s administration and dogged his successors for a century as a major issue and expense… [in many cases] the settlers were Native American, the scalpers white.


[…] All the textbooks tell how Jefferson “doubled the size of the United States by buying Louisiana from France.” Not one points out that it was not France’s land to sell–it was Indian land… Indeed, France did not really sell Louisiana for $15,000,000. France merely sold its claim to the territory… Equally Eurocentric are the maps textbooks use to show the Lewis and Clark expedition. They make Native American invisible, implying that the United States bought vacant land from the French… [Textbooks imply that the Indians were naive about land ownership, but] the problem lay in whites’ not abiding by accepted concepts of land ownership.


[…] The most important cause of the War of 1812.. was land– Indian land… The United States fought five of the seven major land battles of the War of 1812 primarily against Native Americans… [a] result of the War of 1812 was the loss of part of our history. A century of learning [from Native Americans] was coming to a close… until 1815 the word Americans had generally been used to refer to Native Americans; after 1815 it meant European Americans… Carleton Beals has written that “our acquiescence in Indian dispossession has molded the American character.” … destroyed our national idealism. From 1815 on, instead of spreading democracy, we exported the ideology of white supremacy. Gradually we sought American hegemony over Mexico, the Philippines, much of the Caribbean basin, and, indirectly, over other nations… We also have to admit that Adolf Hitler displayed more knowledge of how we treated Native Americans than American high schoolers who rely on their textbooks. Hitler admired our concentration camps for Indians in the west “and often praised to his inner circle the efficiency of America’s extermination–by starvation and uneven combat” as the model for his extermination of Jews and Gypsies.


[…] Yet we “still stereotype Native Americans as roaming primitive hunting folk, unfortunate victims of progress.

— 

Excerpts from  Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong 

by James W. Loewen

Admit It

Anon Prompt: “Hi, can you do one where Juggie gets really jealous of best friend Y/N because she always goes out but she is just doing it on purpose? Because she likes him? Then they admit their feelings.”

Word Count: 2.2k

Tags: Underage drinking, borderline underage alcoholism, underage sex, smut, porn with plot, swearing. I know you said smut or fluff but there’s going to be smut and angst

A/N: I just wanted to say that I’m really thankful for the kind messages from everyone and for the followers who have been so patient with me. I’m sorry it’s been so long. I’ve also never written heterosexual smut before, so sorry if it sucks!! Smut is in the read more, so don’t read if you’re uncomfortable with smut and non asexual jughead 

Originally posted by bettytail


The people around me cheer as I furiously chug the beer, I’m in a race against Reggie Mantle.
Loser must buy the winner a life time supply of Pop’s whenever they want.

Half of the party seems to be cheering me on, whilst the other cheers for Reggie’s victory; from the corner of my eye, I look over at Reggie who at the wrong time, sucks in air and ends up choking, he spits beer everywhere.
I finish mine and crush the can triumphantly; I smile at Reggie who is wiping beer of his face.

“Good game, Mantle.” I laugh, holding my hand out.

“I can’t believe I lost to a girl.” He huffs, shaking my hand.

“Didn’t you get the memo, Reggie? Chauvinism is dead.” Jughead says, wrapping his arm around me.

“Hey Juggie!” I giggle, the alcohol is going to my head, so is the loud thrum of the music.

Keep reading

What Do We Find Attractive?

Reblog this post if you find the ladies of long ago to still be beautiful in our modern 21st century!

In our era where thigh-high splits in skirts and navel-length necklines in dresses dominate the couture of what seems like nearly every female celebrity—not to mention many instances of very heavy makeup—one often has to wonder how our standards of the beauty ideal have changed. A century and more ago, Charles Dana Gibson developed what was considered for that era, the Ideal Woman. She had a sweet and wholesome look, and one of her biggest extravagancies was her pompadour hairdo, commonly referred to afterward as the “Gibson Girl” look.

A woman—if she wanted to retain the title of a true lady—would be dressed most respectably always, and if she dared to show her ankles among the company of men, oh, she was a hussy! When we realize what was considered proper in terms of dress in the Edwardian era (and what could really be inexplicably daring!), one often has to wonder how some vintage photos we look at now seemed in their heyday. By looking at this image below, the question that comes to mind is, Was Camille Clifford considered to appear “loose”? Although her gown was generous in length, the cut of her neckline seems to me to be a bit of an eyebrow-raiser in its day.

If Miss Clifford lived now and appeared on the red carpet, would she even be noticed for this? I’d say not at all! She would look exceptionally modest and would instead likely earn either high accolades of being most stylish (as I would tell her!) or be censured for being old-fashioned! It really is incredible how fashions change.
   When we are bombarded with more and more bold fashions and daring hair colors, one has to wonder if the glamour of long ago can last today.
   If you find such luminaries as Camille Clifford and Evelyn Nesbit (to name just a few; I’ve picture more well-known faces below), let me know by reblogging this post!

~ The Modern Edwardian

Above > Zena Dare

Above > Florence Evelyn Nesbit

Above > Ethel Barrymore

Here’s an adorable marginal caterpillar from our early sixteenth-century processional for your #ManuscriptMonday this week. MU Ellis Special Collections Rare Vault BX2032 .A2 1510z 

ditnightingale  asked:

Hello!! Hope you're well. I wanted to ask if you've found any other urban fantasy books (or plain fantasy) that you would definitely recommend. I'm a massive Rivers of London fan (though I'm not in the fandom) and I've been looking for things to fill the void. Thanks and have a lovely week!

I’m going to preface this by saying that Rivers of London isn’t urban fantasy in a genre sense (I mean, yes, it involves magic and magical creatures living in a large city, but at its heart it’s a police procedural/British murder mystery.) So with that in mind, my recommendations for things I have read recently that might appeal to a RoL fan, only a couple of which are straightforward urban fantasy: 

Zen Cho, Sorceror to the Crown. It’s Regency-era Britain, England’s magic is drying up, and Zacharias Wythe, freed from slavery as a child and now Sorceror to the Crown, has to find out why. Totally delightful. You can try another urban fantasy novella by the same author, Prudence and the Dragon, online. 

Max Gladstone, the Craft Sequence. Secondary-world urban fantasy based around the concept that large financial entities are gods, or rather that gods operate like large financial entities, meaning that magicians are basically….lawyers. Read in publication order, starting with Three Parts Dead. Not related, but an excellent example of Gladstone’s worldbuilding skills, is the short story The Scholast in the Low Waters Kingdom, available for free online. 

Charles Stross, the Laundry Files. This series started as Lovecraft/spy novel pastiche hybrids with a lot of computer jokes and has morphed into urban fantasy…ish…along the way; you can either start at the beginning (The Atrocity Archives) or jump in at the latest, which has a new PoV narrator, an accidental vampire with a mathematics PhD (The Nightmare Stacks). 

Marie Brennan, the Lady Trent series I actually need to catch up on these but the first two are great so I have no hesitation in reccing anyway. They’re set in a secondary world approximating our own nineteenth century, and follow Isabella, eventually Lady Trent, as she sets out to study dragons scientifically. The first is A Natural History of Dragons. 

Terry Pratchett, the Watch, Witches, and Ankh-Morpork parts of the Discworld series There’s like a 0.02% chance you haven’t read these but just in case: RoL draws heavily on Pratchett (FS is dedicated to him) and most of all from these parts of the Discworld series. Begin with Men at Arms (Watch), Lords and Ladies (Witches, should be required reading before FS anyway) or Going Postal (Ankh-Morpork). 

K J Charles, Charm of Magpies series These are m/m romance but also Victorian-era fantasy set (mostly) in London; one of the leads is a practitioner of magic whose job it is to police other practitioners. Stylistically it’s like reading a very very good AU slashfic for a fandom that doesn’t exist, and if the author is not in fandom I will eat my entire collection of elegant cloche hats. Starts with The Magpie Lord. 

Genevieve Cogman, The Invisible Library trilogy Irene works for the interdimensional Invisible Library, which rescues rare books from alternate universes. Lots of literary references, lots of fun, one shout-out to RoL. 

N K Jemisin, The City Born Great - not a book but a free short story about personified cities. Gorgeous imagery. 

Just some study tips that I like to use, and thought maybe other people would find helpful!

1. Re-write your notes in ‘casual form’

This is probably the method I use the most, just because I find it funny. Basically what I do is I write a summary version of my notes, but I write it in the same way I would speak if I was trying to explain this topic to a friend. When your notes say: “David Hym used Faeries to Explain the theory of Monetary Neutrality in the 17th century” you re-write “Our 17th century homie  David H had a slight fetish with Faeries, but that’s his own business. All we care about is the fact that price be change if money supply be changing.” This method can take a little bit longer, but I do find that it makes your notes more interesting to look over later. And more importantly, it really helps you remember things because your are rewriting it in your own words. Everyone says the best way to learn something is to teach it, so imagine you are teaching a friend over a beer, you wouldn’t explain it in casual structural form, you would explain it how you would talk. Honestly I rewrite my notes a lot for studying purposes, and this method is probably the most beneficial. It summaries everything as well as put it into your own words, and the best part is that its kinda funny!

2. Paint your nails

I always find that I feel more “study aesthetic” when I my nails are painted. I know this sounds kind of strange, but when my nails are painted I automatically feel like typing on my computer is better, and my handwriting is more aesthetically pleasing. I just feel like a more composed and accomplished person overall. I cant really explain it, and honestly its probably just because I never really have my nails painted, but hey it doesn’t hurt to try if you find you are lacking motivation.

3. Use your music playlist and as a timer

No matter what type of music you listen to, I recommend making your own playlist. The reason I suggest doing this is because you can use your playlist as a timer! I find that when I have a timer app on my phone, I check it WAY to many times, seeing how much time is left, did I turn the volume up, ect. BUT if you make a playlist, filled with instrumental music for example, and then every 5-8 songs, you input a song with lyrics, you know that songs with lyrics are your break time! So, as soon as the instrumental fades out, and your 1-3 lyric songs come on, you know its free time! And once the lyrics end, its time to get back to work. You can literally shut your phone off if you use your laptop for music, and you wont be tempted to check a timer every 10 minutes to make sure you didn’t miss the break time alarm!

4. Download the “Get Shit Done” App

This app is wonderful because it literally just sets a time limit for you to get some shit done. Although I prefer a Pomodoro type clock for normal studying, if I have something to get done (An essay, a set of notes) that I am seriously procrastinating, I find this app helpful. All you do is set a time limit, set a reward and a punishment, and decide if you get breaks or not. As soon as you hit start, you have to complete the task in the allotted time period, otherwise the app sends you a mean message and the punishment you decide is put on the screen. This app is good for when you need to just DO something, but your motivation is -2. I find the allotted time period helps me overcome procrastination in a way that Pomodoro cannot.

5. Listen to Disney Music

The third tip in this post was to use your playlist as a timer, so going off that, I thought I would talk about type of music that I enjoy listening to while studying.
I am a huge nerd. no shame. And as much as I enjoy studying listening to movie soundtracks or video game soundtracks, I find that what I like the most is Disney Land music soundtracks. I know that sounds super lame, but honestly the music that Disney Land plays in its ride ques is so awesome for studying because its happy, and upbeat, and it makes you feel less like you are dying. Also the music is not so intense you are freaking out (Video Game soundtracks for me) or so calm that you are falling asleep (Classical music for me) is just a nice, happy, in between. This is the playlist I use - its nice because it has some ride tracks mixed in, so I find that I study while the instrumental tracks are on, and the lyrical ride tracks are my breaks.