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“Seamount fisheries have often been described as mining operations rather than sustainable fisheries. They typically collapse within a few years of the start of fishing and the trawlers then move on to other unexploited seamounts to maintain the fishery.”  

Philip Mladenov, author of Marine Biology: A Very Short Introduction, explores the future of seamount ecosystems on the OUPblog.

Image credit: By NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

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Earth Day: A reading list | OUPblog

To celebrate Earth Day on 22 April, we have created a reading list of books, journals, and online resources that explore environmental protection, environmental ethics, and other environmental sciences. Earth Day was first celebrated in 1970 in the United States. Since then, it has grown to include more than 192 countries and the Earth Day Network coordinate global events that demonstrate support for environmental protection. 

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Top OUPblog posts of 2013: Editor's picks - OUPblog

As editor of the OUPblog, I’m probably one of only a handful who read everything we publish over the course of the year. Even those posts which are coded and edited by our Deputy Editors I carefully read through in the hopes of catching any errors (some always make it through). So it’s wonderful to reflect on the amazing work that our authors, editors, and staff have created in 2013. Without further ado, here are a few of my favorites from the past year…

6

There were several important records released in 1959, but no event or recording matches the importance of the release of the new Miles Davis album Kind of Blue on 17 August 1959. There were people waiting in line at record stores to buy it on the day it appeared. It sold very well from its first day, and it has sold increasingly well ever since. It is the best-selling jazz album in the Columbia Records catalogue, and at the end of the twentieth century it was voted one of the ten best albums ever produced.

Jeremy Yudkin writes about the classic album over on the OUPblog. Above, you find his bibliography and a great selection of books about the great American jazz musician. 

  • Chambers, Jack. Milestones: The Music and Times of Miles Davis.  Reprint: 2 vols. in one. New York: Da Capo, 1998.
  • Davis, Miles with Quincy Troupe. Miles: The Autobiography. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1989.
  • Gridley, Mark. Jazz Styles: History and Analysis. 7th edition. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2000.
  • Szwed, John. So What: The Life of Miles Davis.  New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002.
  • Yudkin, Jeremy. Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Birth of Postbop. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2007.
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OUPblog: In search of hot jazz

via @brainpicker: Fantastic guide to free jazz online from NPR’s Fresh Air

Kevin Whitehead is the longtime jazz critic for National Public Radio’s “Fresh Air” and has written about jazz for many publications, including the Chicago Sun-Times, Down Beat, and the Village Voice. He is most recently the author of Why Jazz? A Concise Guide. Listen to his interview on The Oxford Comment.

Ways to be Autism aware

Today is World Autism Awareness Day, and over on the OUPblog, Alice Hammel and Ryan Hourigan, authors of Teaching Music to Students with Special Needs: A Label-Free Approach and the forthcoming Teaching Music to Students with Autism, have shared their ways to be Autism aware.

  1. Be aware that people with autism can usually understand more than they can express.
  2. Be aware that people with autism can be sensitive.
  3. Be aware that people with autism think differently.
  4. Be aware that people with autism probably have a specific interest or topic that may help with communication.
  5. Be aware that people with autism tend to focus on the trees rather than the forest.
  6. Be aware that a child (or adult) with autism may be having a moment in public that seems confusing to you.
  7. Be aware that people with autism may need help with social circumstances.
  8. Be aware that a family that includes a person with autism may be tired and stressed.
  9. Be aware that a child with autism may have siblings that get less attention than they do.
  10. Be aware that a person with autism is a person and not a label.

Read the full blog post for the complete listing.

Why a technologically enhanced future will be less good than we think | OUPblog

See on Scoop.it - Knowmads, Infocology of the future

Today there are high hopes for technological progress. Techno-optimists expect massive benefits for humankind from the invention of new technologies. Peter Diamandis is the founder of the X-prize foundation whose purpose is to arrange competitions for breakthrough inventions. His aim is “a world of nine billion people with clean water, nutritious food, affordable housing, personalized education, top-tier medical care, and nonpolluting, ubiquitous energy”. The Internet is a special focus for techno-optimists. According to the Google executives Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen “future connectivity promises a dazzling array of ‘quality of life’ improvements: things that make you healthier, safer and more engaged”. K. Eric Drexler’s preferred instrument of universal prosperity is nanotechnology. He envisages a future in which miniature robots produce “a radical abundance beyond the dreams of any king, a post-industrial material abundance that reaches the ends of the earth and lightens its burden.”


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Contemporary Muslims and the challenge of modernity | OUPblog
In my 22 years of teaching and writing about Arabic and Islamic Studies, I have probably heard every kind of naive and uninformed comment that can possibly be made in the West about Islam and Muslims. Such remarks are not necessarily all due to ill will; most of the time, they express bewilderment and stem from an inability to find accessible, informed sources that might begin to address such widespread public incomprehension. Add that to the almost daily barrage of news and media commentary concerning violence in the Middle East and South Asia, two regions viscerally connected with Islam and Muslims.
6

Oxford University Press celebrates Doctor Who’s Fiftieth Anniversary! Are any of you really surprised that we employ a fair number of Whovians around the globe? From our Oxford office (it’s bigger on the inside), to Cary, North Carolina (seat of the High Council of Gallifrey), to (Dalek-terrorised!) New York, many of us will be spending this Saturday hiding behind the sofa, sonic screwdriver in hand, and with U.N.I.T. on standby. 

For those of you who have yet to discover the joys of travelling with a Time Lord, we have a few resources for you.  

And you can always follow the official Doctor Who Tumblr

Check this out : Why do we prefer eating sweet things?

Is the “sweet tooth” real? The answer may surprise you. Humans vary in their preference towards sweet things; some of us dislike them while others may as well be addicted. But for those of us who have a tendency towards sweetness, why do we like what we like? We are hardly limited by type; our preference spans across both food and drinks, including candy, desserts, fruits, sodas, and even alcoholic beverages.

The post Why do we prefer eating sweet things? appeared first on OUPblog.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ten myths about the French Revolution | OUPblog

The overthrow of Robespierre in Thermidor (July 1794) was brought about to end the Terror and instil democracy. 

No. Robespierre’s fall and execution was engineered by a group of his fellow Jacobins, some of whom were more extreme terrorists than he was, because they thought he was about to call for their arrest and feared for their own lives. They assumed that the terror would continue. As one deputy admitted, Thermidor was not about principles, but about killing. In the turmoil that ensued, moderates were able to regain the initiative and after over 100 of Robespierre’s supporters were guillotined, slowly the terror laws began to be wound down. Successive regimes (the Thermidoreans and the Directory) were not interested in democracy but in keeping the middle classes in power. The Constitution of 1795 reinstated a franchise restricted to men with property.

Solo adventurers face loneliness and the risk of psychological breakdown, while those whose mission involves long-term confinement with a small group may experience stressful interpersonal conflict. All of that is on top of the physical hardships like sleep deprivation, pain, hunger, and squalor. What can the rest of us learn from those hardy individuals who survive and thrive in extreme places?

Children’s voices in family law conflicts | OUPblog

Children are commonly recognized as separate human beings with individual views and wishes worthy of consideration. Their ability to freely express these views and wishes constitutes the concept of child participation, defined by Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child as the right of children capable of forming their own views to be able to express themselves freely in all matters affecting their lives. Sourced through Scoop.it from: blog.oup.com See on Scoop.it - Parental Responsibility

Why a technologically enhanced future will be less good than we think | OUPblog

See on Scoop.it - cognition

Today there are high hopes for technological progress. Techno-optimists expect massive benefits for humankind from the invention of new technologies. Peter Diamandis is the founder of the X-prize foundation whose purpose is to arrange competitions for breakthrough inventions. His aim is “a world of nine billion people with clean water, nutritious food, affordable housing, personalized education, top-tier medical care, and nonpolluting, ubiquitous energy”. The Internet is a special focus for techno-optimists. According to the Google executives Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen “future connectivity promises a dazzling array of ‘quality of life’ improvements: things that make you healthier, safer and more engaged”. K. Eric Drexler’s preferred instrument of universal prosperity is nanotechnology. He envisages a future in which miniature robots produce “a radical abundance beyond the dreams of any king, a post-industrial material abundance that reaches the ends of the earth and lightens its burden.”


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The future of marijuana law reform in the U.S. | OUPblog

Currently 23 states plus the District of Columbia had legalized marijuana for medical purposes and 4 states (Colorado, Washington, Alaska, and … Colorado MMJ