other black people

Full offence, but if you’re in law enforcement and you shoot into a car with a four year-old child sitting in the backseat because you “feared for your life,” then you’re not only a fucking failure as a police officer, but you’re also a pile of shit human being who isn’t worth the piece of paper your birth certificate is printed on.

Like, not only did Jeronimo Yanez literally murder Philando Castile in coldblood for no good reason other than “I think Black people are scary,” but he also put his well-being (which wasn’t even under threat in the fucking first place) above that of a preschooler. He decided in that moment, based on nothing but a racist pre-judgment, that his life was worth more than that of a little four-year-old girl, and in a world with any justice he would have been locked up for that reason right along with a manslaughter conviction. 

The jury for this case basically just looked this poor, absolutely traumatised little girl in the eye and said “We think you are disposable.” Obviously, they thought the same of Philando Castile. 

There is no non-Black person in this country who should not be wallowing in shame right now; our depravity is a scourge. 

Real Talk: Jackson. Appropriation VS Appreciation.

This is about Jackson Wang from Got7 wearing dread locks in a Chinese advertisement, just in case you haven’t seen all of the drama and people attacking him. (pictures below)

I’ll start off with saying, I don’t give a fuck that he wore dreadlocks. There, that saved you a lot of reading and time, so if you would like to unfollow/block me, go ahead. Agree to disagree. People want MY opinion on this, so here it is:

The way people are attacking him is all kinds of wrong. I’m ok with people explaining nicely about the history of dreads and how people can take an offense to non Black people wearing that style, that’s their opinion, even though some where being way too harsh about it but reading all the hate comments are disgusting. You would think Jackson got caught in an animal cruelty case (God forbid) or rape case (God forbid), so I’m reading twitter and instagram and saying to myself…what is happening? I’ve never seen K Hip Hop artist get THIS much heat and they wear dreads and braids on a daily basis, but when Jackson wears them in an ad, he gets so much hate and death threats.

“He’s so wrong”

“Educate him”

“He doesn’t care about Black people but he’s wearing our hair style” - Oh I’m sorry I didn’t know Jackson hated Black people..

Let me tell you something, I know people are going to hate me for my opinion, but they hate me anyway lol, so fuck it. I understand where their passion comes from, people hate that other races look up to Black people and want to dress like us, be like us, but at the end of the day they don’t want to be with us or could care less about us for real, I GET IT!. I get it, there’s a lot of people out there that don’t like us for real but wear our hair styles. I understand appropriation. I understand the history of it all. I’m proud to be Black and love my race, my culture and the passion we have.

And I also love that other races look up to our people sooo much that they want to dress like their favorite rapper, or try their style, the rappers themselves are even flattered and don’t care, they just love that they are looked up to and inspire people of all races.

Oh wait, my antil Blackness coon-ness is showing, let me stop! (sarcasm)

But personally, If people who are not Black wear braids, dreadlocks and they’re NOT doing it to mock us, profit from us, claiming it as their own, not a racist, and fucks with my people heavy and NOT doing it to degrade our race (like Jackson!), then I don’t give a damn how you wear your hair, bitch you can wear dreadlocks til yo ass 90, I do not give a damn, there’s some fuck up things going on out there in the REAL world of appropriation. Like this fashion show that was urban themed, gave them afros, braids, but there were no Black people in the show, obviously I was annoyed, because what are they doing? Profiting off of Black people and NOT giving any credit and claiming it as new/ their own. That’s the problem with appropiating. It’s stealing from one’s culture and giving no credit.

What is Jackson doing? Is he racist? is he claiming it as his own? Is he constantly doing it? Is he discrediting Black people and acting like it’s a brand new thing he’s doing?

What did Jackson do that SOOOOOOO MANY other non Black people do every day and are getting their hair braided as I type this. I’m lost as to why people are jumping down his throat and giving him threats and demanding an apology like he said “N*gger” or something?

This girl shared my inner thoughts on appropriation. (should watch this).

And also this.


^ He’s right!  What I said above, he’s NOT doing it to degrade or profit from our race. I said my thoughts before he even responded.

+ People are offended by his response saying he “is saying fck you to us, he doesn’t care about our culture, he doesn’t listen to us”, damn! what do you want him to say? Do you not see the hate comments he’s getting?, telling him to die, saying racial slurs, you guys want to play victim in every little thing so badly, there is NOTHING wrong with his responses, they are haters. He could’ve said worse.

+And “you are on the wrong page” he’s right! If you don’t like him and want to send him hate, then you ARE ON THE WRONG PAGE. If you have a problem with him, then don’t be on his page. don’t even click on it.

^HE APPRECIATES OUR PEOPLE!

HE’S INSPIRED BY OUR PEOPLE!

HE LOVES OUR PEOPLE!

HE LOOKS UP TO OUR PEOPLE!

The last thing on my mind is someone’s hair. I don’t know about y’all but I got bigger fish to fry in this racist world, and Jackson’s 2 minute twists are the least of the problem.

And I know they will say, “So who cares wrong is wrong, he needs to be educated”, HE IS! He knows about Black people, his role models are Black, so of course he’s going to want what they want, you guys are acting like he wore the dreads to be ignorant and racist and you’re acting like he constantly “steals” from our culture and profits from it, he doesn’t.

I’m out.

Here’s the picture:


Watch the haters come in 3, 2, 1…

4

She wanted to be what you were, agent. Don’t forget that.

Black Widow Strikes #3 (2012)

A white guy’s thoughts on “Get Out” and racism

This weekend, I went to see a horror movie. It got stuck in my head, and now I can’t stop thinking about it—but not for any of the reasons you might think.

The movie was Jordan Peele’s new hit Get Out, which has gotten rave reviews from critics—an incredible 99% on Rotten Tomatoes—and has a lot of people talking about its themes.

First of all, I should tell you that I hate horror movies. As a general rule, I stay far, far away from them, but after everything I’d read, I felt like this was an important film for me to see. This trailer might give you some inkling as to why:

Creepy, huh? You might know writer/director Jordan Peele as part of the comedy duo Key & Peele, known for smartly tackling societal issues through sketch comedy. Get Out is a horror movie, but it’s also a film about race in America, and it’s impressively multilayered.

I left the theater feeling deeply disturbed but glad this movie was made. I can’t say any more without revealing spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet and you don’t want to have the plot spoiled for you, stop reading now and come back later.

Seriously, this is your last chance before I give away what happens.

Okay, you were warned. Here we go.

Our protagonist is Chris Washington, a young black man who has been dating Rose Armitage, a young white woman, for the last four months. She wants him to meet her family, but he’s hesitant. She acknowledges that her dad can be a little awkward on the subject of race, but assures Chris that he means well.

After unnerving encounters with a deer (echoes of The Invitation) and a racist cop, Chris and Rose arrive at the Armitages’ estate. On the surface, the Armitages are very friendly, but the conversation (brilliantly scripted by Peele) includes a lot of the little, everyday, get-under-your-skin moments of racism that people of color have to contend with: Rose’s dad going on about how he voted for Obama, for instance, and asking how long “this thang” has been going on. Chris laughs it off to be polite, though he clearly feels uncomfortable.

There’s a fantastic moment here, by the way, when Rose’s dad offhandedly mentions that they had to close off the basement because of “black mold.” In the midst of the racially charged atmosphere of the conversation, it’s nearly impossible not to take this as a racial remark, and Chris certainly notices, but what could he possibly say about it? Black mold is a real thing; his girlfriend would surely think he was crazy and oversensitive if he said it sounded racist. Chris never reacts to the remark, but that one tiny moment is a reminder to the audience of a real problem people of color often face, when racism can’t be called out without being accused of “playing the race card” or seeing things that aren’t there. (Incidentally, it turns out that the basement is actually used for molding of a different sort.)

There are other reasons for Chris to be unsettled: The only other black people on the estate are two servants, Georgina and Walter (Rose’s dad says he knows how bad it looks, but that it’s not what it seems), and something is clearly “off” about them. Later, more white people show up—and one more black character, and he, too, feels “off.”

By the end of the film, we learn the horrible secret: Rose’s family is kidnapping and luring black people to their estate, where they’re being hypnotized and psychologically trapped inside themselves—Rose’s mom calls it “the sunken place”—so that old or disabled white people’s consciousnesses can be transplanted into their bodies. The white people are then able to move about, controlling their new black bodies, with the black person’s consciousness along for the ride as a mere “passenger.” In a shocking twist, it turns out that even apparently-sweet Rose is in on the plot, and Chris must fight her and the rest of her family to escape.

This isn’t a “white people are evil” film, although it may sound that way at first, but it is a film about racism. I know many of my friends of color will connect with this movie in a way I can’t, so I won’t try to say what I think they’ll get out of it. I do want to say how I connected with it, though, because I think what Jordan Peele has done here is really important for white audiences. 

If you look beyond the surface horror-movie plot, this film actually gives white people a tiny peek at the reality of racism—not the epithet-shouting neo-Nazi kind of racism that white people normally imagine when we hear “racism,” but the “Oh it’s so nice to meet you; I voted for Obama” kind of racism, the subtle othering that expects people of color to smile and get along and adopt white culture as their own whenever they’re around white people.

So many of the moments in Get Out are clearly intended to work on multiple levels. When Chris confronts Georgina about something being wrong and she smiles and says, “No, no no no no no,” with tears streaming down her cheeks, the symbolism is blatant. How often do people of color have to ignore the subtle indignities they face and hide their true emotions in order to avoid coming across as, for example, “the angry black woman/man”? How many times do they find themselves in social situations—even with their closest white friends!—where people make little comments tying them to an “exotic,” supposedly monolithic culture, where they have to respond with a smile and a laugh instead of telling people how stupid and offensive they’re being? 

I can’t tell you the number of these stories I’ve heard from my friends, and I’m quite sure that the stories I’ve heard are only a tiny fraction of the stories that could be told. So there’s something in that moment that speaks volumes about the experiences of people of color in America.

The same is true for so many other moments. The black characters Chris meets at the Armitages’ have all symbolically given up their identities and conformed to white culture; when Chris meets one character, he turns out to be going under a new name, with new clothes and new mannerisms; when Chris offers him a fist bump, he tries to shake Chris’s fist. Again, within the story, there’s an explanation for all this, but every moment here is also about assimilation and culture differences. 

For me as a white audience member, all of these moments did something remarkable: They showed me my own culture—a culture I’m often blissfully unaware of because it’s all around me—as something alien. They reminded me that I, too, have a culture, and that expecting everyone else to assimilate to my culture is just as much an erasing of their identities as it would be to expect me to assimilate to someone else’s culture.

And that’s a big part of what Get Out is about—the erasing of identities, and the power of racism to destroy people. I think it’s really significant that racism is portrayed here very differently from how it’s normally portrayed in movies written by white people. In most Hollywood movies, you know a character is racist because they shout racial epithets or make blatant statements about a certain race’s inferiority. That allows white audiences to say, “I would never do/say that, so I’m not racist!” We really don’t want to think we are.

But notice something important about Get Out’s treatment of racism: This is a film about the literal enslavement of black people—racism doesn’t get more extreme than that—and yet Peele doesn’t go for the obvious by having the white characters admit that they think black people are inferior; instead, they subjugate and dehumanize people by claiming to admire things about them. They turn them into fashion accessories. 

When Chris asks why only black people are being targeted for this procedure, the response is telling: It’s not (supposedly) because the white characters think African Americans are bad, but rather, because they like certain things about them and they want “a change” for themselves. They want to become black—it’s trendy, we’re told!—but without having had any of the actual life experiences or history of African Americans. White people need to see this: to experience the ways in which Chris is othered by people who tell him all the things they like about him—isn’t he strong? Look at those muscles! Does he play golf like Tiger Woods? And he must be well-endowed and have such sexual prowess, right, Rose?

The white people in the audience need to be reminded that just because you’re saying positive things about someone doesn’t mean you’re not being racist, that turning someone into an exotic “other” may not be the same as shouting an epithet, but it’s still taking away someone’s identity and treating them as a commodity.

The film is filled with these kinds of moments. When we realize that Rose’s white grandmother has inhabited the body of Georgina, the fact that she keeps touching her own hair and admiring herself in the mirror takes on a whole new level of significance. (White people, please don’t ask to touch your black friends’ hair.) When Chris connects with a dying deer on the side of the road and later sees a deer head mounted on the wall at the Armitages’ estate, the symbolism is hard to miss. Black people are being turned into trophies in this house. And, oh yeah, they’re being literally auctioned off—as they were in real life in the not-too-distant past.

One day, I’d like to see the film again to pick up on all the ways things read differently the second time through. I noticed several things in retrospect that gain new significance once you know the ending, and I’m sure there’s a lot I didn’t notice. For example, Rose’s dad says he hired Walter and Georgina to care for his parents, and when his parents died, “I couldn’t bear to let them go.” The first time you see the film, it sounds like the “them” is Walter and Georgina. But in retrospect, it’s clear the “them” he couldn’t bear to let go was his parents, so he sacrificed Walter and Georgina for them. Which, again, is an example of how the supposed care of the white characters for the black characters (his care for Walter and Georgina, Rose’s care for Chris) is really all about caring for themselves and treating the black characters as completely interchangeable objects.

The message of the film isn’t simply that the black characters are “good” and the white characters are “bad.” There are presumably—hopefully—many good white people in the world of this film, and many others who wouldn’t do what the Armitages are doing but also probably wouldn’t believe Chris or make the effort to stop it. Peele’s mother and wife are both white, so he’s clearly not trying to paint all white people as villains. 

But I admit, as a white guy, I really, really wanted Rose to be good. I’ve been the white person in an interracial relationship introducing my black boyfriend to my family. I’ve been that. So I related to Rose, and I really wanted to believe that she was well-intentioned and just oblivious; even though she misses the mark on several occasions, there are times that she seems like she gets it and she really does listen to Chris. When a cop asks to see Chris’s ID early in the film even though he wasn’t driving, Rose stands up against the obvious racism, showing us all what it looks like for white people to do the right thing. “That was hot,” Chris says to her later, and I thought, yeah, that’s who I want to be.

So I have to admit, it was really upsetting to me to see Rose, the only good white character left in the film, turn out to be evil. But I realized that part of that is that I really wanted her to represent me, and that’s really the point. Just think how often horror films have only one black character who dies early on, and how many films of all genres have no significant black characters for audience members to look up to or identify with. I think it’s really important for white audiences to experience that.

As I’ve reflected on the film, it seems to me like there are three kinds of popular movies about people of color. There are those that feature POC characters that are essentially indistinguishable from the white characters—as if they just decided to cast Morgan Freeman instead of Tom Hanks without giving any thought to the character’s race. Then there are the movies that deal with racism, but in a way that allows white people to feel good about ourselves, because we’re not like the characters in the film. (This is especially true for movies about racism in the past; some of them are very important films, like Hidden Figures, which I loved, but we need to be aware that it’s still easy for white America to treat it as a feel-good film and think that we’re off the hook because we no longer have separate restrooms.) And finally, there are movies that focus more directly on the lives of people of color but tend to draw largely audiences of color; not many white people go see them, because we think they’re not “for us” (even though we assume films about white people are for everyone).

Get Out isn’t any of those. It’s drawing a broad audience but it’s not afraid to make white people uncomfortable. And if you can give me, a white guy, a chance to have even a momentary fraction of an experience of the real-life, modern-day, casual racism facing people of color in America, I think that’s a very good thing.

"White people cant experience racism."

Keep repeating that while:

◎ White people get refused cooking jobs in black neighborhoods because “white people cant cook.” Or “white people dont season their food.”

◎ White rappers are judged on their skin color before their abiities.

◎ Poor white people in the same neighborhoods as black people (in majority blavk or latino neighnoorhoods) are still seen as doing better financially because of their race.

◎ Unarmed white people can be shot by black cops and it isnt made into a race issue.

◎ The majority perpetrator of violence against black people is other black people (by far), yet white people are blamed anyway

◎ Black people being assumed to be or joked about being in a gang is racist, but Italian people being assumed to be or joked about being in the mafia is not.

◎ Black or latino people being assumed drunks is racist, but Irish people being assumed drunks is not.

◎ Southern white people are assumed stupid or incompotent because of their accent and that’s acceptable. But black people with heavy use of slang being assumed stupid or incompotent is racist.

◎ It’s wrong to steroetype black people, but caricatures like Mario are fully acceptable.

◎ Germans and Austrians are assumed to be affiliated with Nazis because of their accents and heritage, but black people or mexicans being assumed druglords is fought against

◎ Europeans and caucasians in general are assumed to have no culture despite mountians of evidence proving otherwise, but ignorance on African culture is assumed to be racism.

◎ White families being against a family member dating a black person is assumed racist and intolerant. Black families being against a family member dating a white person is acceptable and can even be encouraged.

◎ Basically any hardship white people face often gets excused because of their race.

◎ People try to change the definition of racism to excuse their ignorance, stereotyping, hate, and overall racism based on their race.

Me seeing Black anti sjws interacting with white nationalists and supremacists on here and seeing them pride themselves on being against modern civil rights movements //especially// BLM because they’re not like other Black people or “Black Tumblr/Twitter”

anonymous asked:

I feel like a fool for not knowing this but how are the sciences used to promote white supremacy? Does this refer to all sciences or just the social sciences? If it's much too complicated to sum up succinctly why they're racist, could you maybe point me to some reading material on the subject? I wouldn't really know where to start researching a topic like this. Thank you.

every natural and social science originated in service to, is deeply indebted to, or has at least been wielded in service of, empire & white supremacy (some more directly than others imo). science & scientific thought under capitalism exist as tools for the dissemination of narratives that support capitalism and/or imperialist exploitation, plus some scientific knowledge arises from or is used to further imperialism & white supremacy in a very immediate sense.

a few things to consider off the top of my head:

additional readings and specific things to research can be found in my science tag

things to remember

black girls like (and appreciate) art
black girls like music - all kinds of it
black girls have all kinds of aesthetics
black girls have good hair
black girls can be pretentious
black girls can be thick
black girls can be skinny
black girls can be depressed
black girls can be quiet
black girls can be shy
black girls can say nigga
black girls can be queer
black girls have fathers - not all of us have sad childhood tales to tell you and if we did who tf said we wanted to?
black girls are gorgeous and it’s not just “for” their race
not all black girls play basketball
not all black girls can twerk
not all black girls like rap music
not all black girls are related to other black people
not all black girls are angry - although even if we were could you fucking blame us? you try living as a black girl and see how happy you are
not all black girls are “sassy”
not all black girls are the same
black girls do not need you validation
black girls can cry
black girls can be vulnerable
black girls have feelings
BLACK GIRLS ARE HUMAN