ostrich feather fans

Art deco fashion illustration by George Barbier, Cortège (Procession). Robes du soir, de Worth (Evening dresses by House of Worth). La Gazette du Bon Ton, 1924.

3

A Reville Ltd of Paris couture court dress and train, circa 1928, 

Labelled Reville Ltd, and with inscribed ribbon label ‘Lady Holcroft’, the extensively beaded flapper-style dress in black and white seed beads with clear droplet beads, the bodice and waist defined by rhinestone studded bands, the matching train in dramatic black and white with foliate bands, edged in black velvet; together with court presentation plumes and veils and an ostrich feather fan (qty) This dress was worn by Lady Annie Holcroft at the Presentation Court of 9th May 1928.

Margaret Campbell, Duchess of Argyll dressed in 30s glamour attending an event in 1934.

Margaret Campbell was the most famous and feted debutante in an age when rich and beautiful debs were media stars. Margaret Duchess of Argyll, who has died aged 80 (1993), was one of the most photographed and publicized beauties of the 20th century and a seemingly indomitable social figure.

But between 1959 and 1963 she was involved in a sensational and sordid divorce case, when her second husband, the 11th Duke of Argyll, Chief of the Clan Campbell and Hereditary Master of the Royal Household in Scotland, sued her for divorce on grounds of adultery.

The court case lasted 11 days, and its piquant details included the theft of a racy diary, in which the Duchess listed the accoutrements of a number of lovers as though she was running them at Newmarket. The 50,000-word judgment, in which the Duke was granted a decree, was one of the longest in the history of the Edinburgh court.

The Duchess was found to have committed adultery with three men named in her husband’s petition and with a fourth, unidentified figure. A pair of photographs was produced in court showing the Duchess, naked save for three strings of pearls, engaged in a sexual act with a man whose face was not shown and who passed into folklore as ‘the Headless Man’.

Lord Wheatley, who tried the case, described the Duchess as 'a completely promiscuous woman …Her attitude towards marriage was what moderns would call enlightened, but which in plain language was wholly immoral’.

Telegraph.

Oh, lord. 

CHRIS, Victor texts later on. I GAVE YUURI KATSUKI ONE OF MY TAIL FEATHERS AND HE GOT DRUNK AND WORE IT IN HIS HAIR AND I WILL NEVER BE THE SAME.  MY FEATHER KNOWS WHAT HIS HAIR FEELS LIKE AND I DON’T, IT IS UNFAIR.

Chris, half a world away, doesn’t understand why Victor doesn’t understand about time zones.  He wakes up enough to send back a half-baked joke about Victor giving Yuuri a literal piece of his ass, and then rolls over and falls asleep again.

Victor is left alone to wonder what other morphs he can acquire that will allow him to give parts of himself away to Yuuri.

WHAT IS THE SOFTEST SHEEP, he begs Google to tell him, already planning the color he will have his wool dyed for the sweater he is going to have hand-knitted from his very own wool for Yuuri. 

An ostrich feather fan, he thinks.  Angora socks. Can you make jewelry from a snake’s shed skin?

The possibilities are dizzying.  He is definitely not thinking about Yuuri wearing nothing but items Victor has spun for him from his own flesh and bone, warmed against his skin.  

(He is ABSOLUTELY thinking about that.)