osiris and isis

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Mythology Moodboard: Egyptian mythology

Nut - Goddess of the sky, she symbolizes the firmament and is considered as the mother of all celestial objects. She is the mother of Isis, Osiris, Seth, Nephtys and according to some versions, Horus and the daughter of Shu, personnification of air and Tefnut, goddess of moisture, moist air, dew and rain.

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Nut is the Egyptian goddess of the sky and all heavenly bodies. Envisioned as as star-covered woman arching over the earth, Nut is the barrier separating the forces of chaos from the ordered cosmos in the world and is considered to be one of the oldest deities in the Egyptian pantheon.

As the mother of Osiris, Isis, Set and Nephthys, Nut is regarded as the mother of the gods and of all things living. She and her husband Geb are considered to be the givers of food and water, not only to the living but also to the dead. In this role she is seen as a protector of the dead. 

Painted wooden box from Ancient Egypt, used to hold either ushabtis or canopic jars.  On the side shown, the goddesses Isis and Nephthys venerate a djed-pillar (representing the backbone of Osiris).  Artist unknown; ca. 850-700 BCE (Third Intermediate Period).  Now in the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.  Photo credit: Walters Art Museum.

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hynpos’s myth event: favorite egyptian deiity pair/group or myth creature

And for this reason the Egyptians embalmed dead and set the bodies away beneath towering pyramids of stone and deep in the tomb chambers of western Thebes, so that the blessed souls returning from Amenti should find them ready to enter again, and in them to live for ever on earth under the good god Osiris, Isis his queen and their son Horus.

Nut Aesthetic

Nut was the Egyptian sky-goddess, whose body created a canopy over the earth. Her body arches across the sky, wearing a dress decorated with stars. She was the sister and wife of Geb, the god of the Earth. She was also the mother of Isis, Osiris, Nepthys and Seth. The ancient Egyptians believed that at the end of the day, Nut swallowed the sun god, Ra, and gave birth to him again the next morning.

These two rocks are my most precious. On the right is a rock I picked up while visiting the great pyramids. I looked down and it seemed to be smiling at me. (It’s hard to tell in this photo but the scratches sort of look like a smiling skull). It felt like a gift from Osiris.

On the left is a piece of granite from the island that now holds the temple of Philae, the Egyptian temple dedicated to Isis. Having them on my altar makes me feel so much closer to my matron and patron deities.

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STORYTIME: A few months ago, when I decided to add DEITIES artwork to my eternally-WIP portfolio site, I realized that the best way to save gallery space, was to combine the pairs of colors tests onto a single canvas. Doing so helped condense the image count for that portion of my gallery and even tidy up some layouts, and I ended up liking the results!  

However, I debated for the longest time whether or not the updated color tests were worth posting again since… I’m essentially sharing fairly old artwork in a different format >> But then I figured ehh, why not. At least for this version, everyone can view their deity- and animal forms side by side, and this one can be directly linked to the blog from the start o)7

With that said, I did cut out a few details from some of them to make them fit, so anyone can view the original deity forms HERE and the animal forms HERE.

Additionally, all the character designs are being gradually “updated” as I practice drawing them. Their respective tags, along with a larger supporting cast of deities, can be found on the Characters page of the project blog.

At some point, I hope to revisit these and draw updated references and/or model sheet for the main cast. But until then feel free to view and share these early color tests, and thanks again for everyone’s continued support!

DEITIES Project Tumblr / Twitter / Instagram
>> Support DEITIES Project on Patreon! <<

Following on from my previous Chinese Pantheon Map, the Egyptian one! The Egyptian pantheon is actually incredibly complex in that, while it fits or more standard family-tree structure than the Chinese Smite pantheon, there’s a lot of variation in the mythology.

Many of the Egyptian gods are at times considered aspects of other gods or feature in different places or are married to or born from different people thanks to an incredibly long time period and a wide degree of localisation of worship.

It is, for example, possible to consider Ra his own great-granddad. Sort of.

detail of a bronze triad of Osiris (in the middle) flanked by Horus the Child (at left) and Isis (at right); ca. 664-30 BCE
Osiris wears the White Crown with two feathers and holds the flail and the ‘heqa’-scepter;
Isis wears the Solar disk with cow’s horns;
Horus the Child wears the Double Crown and the sidelock of youth

isis · goddess of magic

As the wife of Osiris, Isis assisted her husband during his earthly reign. In the Pyramid Texts, allusions are made that indicate that Isis foresaw her husband’s murder. Following his death, Isis tirelessly searched for his body so that he may be properly buried and may rest in peace in the Underworld. Through her magic, she brought Osiris back to life so that he could impregnate her with their son Horus. Isis was a great magician and is famous for the use of her magical skills. For example, she created the first cobra and used it’s venomous bite to coerce Re into revealing his secret name.