osage-avenue

Today in history: May 13, 1985 - In one of the most outrageous acts of political repression in modern U.S. history, Philadelphia police bomb the MOVE Organization house on Osage Avenue in Philadelphia.

The police attack destroyed two full blocks of homes (65 homes) and killed 11 people, including five children.

(image: crowd watches the results of the police bombing on May 13, 1985)

Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back)

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31 years ago today the city of Philadelphia dropped a bomb on the MOVE family home, killing 11 including 5 children, and destroying 65 homes on the 62nd block of Osage Avenue. No city official faced criminal charges. A year ago today I filmed a protest and Dr. Cornel West deliver a reflection on this state sanctioned mass murder. Mayor Goode claimed he mistook the TV static on the evening news as water being sprayed onto the raging inferno, which is why the fire continued to burn. I am not making this up. Watch Dr. West’s speech in full at hate5six.com/west-move.

For more information about MOVE, check out Jason Osder’s “Let the Fire Burn” on Netflix.
#move #johnafrica #cornelwest #mumiaabujamal #hate5six #philadelphia

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Today marks the 30th Year Commemoration of the Move Bombing where the State Police under the direction of Mayor Wilson B. Goode dropped a Bomb on a house in Philadelphia killing 11 people (including 5 Children)! The City of Philadelphia’s first major confrontation with MOVE came in 1978, when Mayor Frank Rizzo, who liked to brag that his police force could successfully invade Cuba, ordered police to surround MOVE’s house in the Powelton Village section of the city. On August 8, gunfire erupted at the barricaded house, killing Police Officer James Ramp with a bullet through his neck. Nine MOVE members were tried and convicted of third-degree murder; all nine were sentenced to 30 to 100 years. But not only do they deny shooting the officer, saying he was hit by his own colleague’s bullet; they also demanded to know how nine people could all shoot one man with one bullet. In the six years after the shoot-out, nevertheless, police seemed to be waiting for the chance to even the score: David Fattah, of the Muslim community center House of Umoja, recalls seeing graffiti inside a Philadelphia police station that read “MOVE 1, Police 0.”
Fast forward seven years to 1985: All nine convicted MOVE members were then, as now, still in prison. Other members had moved into the house on Osage Avenue, which they had fortified with planks out of the belief that they needed to protect themselves from further attack by the city. They committed themselves above all to vociferously demanding the release of their incarcerated brothers and sisters. To this end, they installed a high-powered loudspeaker on the front of their house, and used it to broadcast their attacks on the city.

Neighbors grew weary of listening to MOVE’s demands hour after hour, day after day . Neighbors began petitioning the city to evict the group, claiming they disturbed the peace and created health hazards by keeping so many stray animals in the house. Little did neighbors suspect that the city would respond to disturbing the peace and sanitary code violations by bombing the house in question and burning down the entire neighborhood.

Today in history: May 13, 1985 - In one of the most outrageous acts of political repression in modern U.S. history, Philadelphia police bomb the MOVE Organization house on Osage Avenue in Philadelphia. The police attack destroyed two full blocks of homes (65 homes) and killed 11 people, including five children.

(image: crowd watches the results of the police bombing on May 13, 1985)

Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

slate.com
A New Documentary About the Time Philadelphia Dropped a Bomb—Yes, a Bomb—on a House Full of Black Radicals
Let the Fire Burn, Jason Osder’s powerful debut documentary, opens with period footage of a soft-spoken boy with two names: Michael Moses Ward and Birdie Africa.

Michael was known as Birdie as a child—he was one of several kids raised by a small black liberation group that occupied a Philadelphia row house on Osage Avenue. They called themselves MOVE, and they wanted to live without technology and without government interference. But the group and the city were constantly at odds.

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