orthodox girl

jewish girls, you are all beautiful.

ashkenazi jewish girls, you are incredible. sephardic jewish girls, you are wonderful. romianote jewish girls, you are brilliant. ethiopian jewish girls, you are amazing. yemenite jewish girls, you are gorgeous. bukharan jewish girls, you are fabulous. indian jewish girls, you are dazzling. kaifeng jewish girls, you are lovely. girls who converted to judaism, you are awesome. orthodox jewish girls, you are great. conservative jewish girls, you are ethereal. reform jewish girls, you are celestial. queer jewish girls, you are breath-taking.

just. jewish girls are so good.

Greek woman in black, holding a candle, during the memorial and protest for Greek, Armenian and Assyrian Genocide in Aghia Sofia circa Thessaloniki, outside of the turkish parliament #May19

pentapentapenta  asked:

Story has 4 Ashkenazim characters as the main cast. Two are Orthodox immigrants from Ukraine (both women), one is Reform from NYC (non-binary, but initially seen as a man), one is a mostly secular woman from an interfaith family. One of the Orthodox women goes through a lot of culture shock in the US and is prone to commenting on others' habits (not nagging, more like a detective). As I'm not Jewish, what intracommunity issues should I avoid bringing up? (1/2)

The secular woman is an accomplice to a murder at one point and has ties to organized crime, but is trying to leave that life. Her arc does not end tragically, though she does flee NY to avoid legal repercussions. Any potential implications for her arc I should keep in mind? The setting is NYC, 1920s. (2/2) (Since I have a bit of extra space: thanks for all the hard work you all do!)

1920’s NYC, Jewish characters

I’m a little curious how someone who isn’t Jewish winds up populating their story with an entirely Jewish cast of leads in the first place. I hope you’ve read some of our literature first just to get a feel for how we work when we tell our own stories. (Recs with settings that might help you specifically: The Golem and the Jinni, set in 1900’s NYC; @barrydeutch ’s Hereville graphic novels, set today but starring an Orthodox girl;Mystery Midrash collection of Jewish mysteries, especially the NYC-immigrant set “Mom Remembers”.)

>> As I’m not Jewish, what intracommunity issues should I avoid bringing up?

Since you’re an outsider you probably shouldn’t take sides using your Jewish characters as a mouthpiece for yourself on whether or not to choose full Orthodox observance vs. Reform practices – as long as both are depicted as a valid personal choice within the story you’ll probably avoid ruffling the most of our feathers. Don’t go out of your way to make Orthodox Jews look un-feminist; there are Orthodox Jewish feminists who have probably made any argument you can think of already not only from within Judaism but within Orthodox culture specifically.

Also, and I can’t stress this enough, we are not “going to hell” if we don’t keep kosher. Jewish people’s relationship with our own rules is not the same as Christianity’s. It’s different in ways many Christians/Christian-born atheists don’t even realize religions can be different. So if your Orthodox character is looking down on the Reform character for some reason it’s probably going to have more of the flavor of “shame you aren’t personally helping keep the tradition alive” than “you are a naughty pangolin and G-d doesn’t love you” – although, like I said, I’d be more comfortable if they didn’t get into those sorts of conflicts at all.

The way I address this kind of difference in observance level in my upcoming f/f novella Knit One, Girl Two is that the secular MC, Clara, keeps making awkward comments about Danielle’s eating habits, since Danielle (who is Reform) goes to services every Friday night and keeps “kosher-lite.” It makes her self-conscious about being so secular, but Danielle reassures her “you think about the way I eat more than I do.” I’ve been in plenty of groups both online and in person where the level of observance varied, and everyone just kind of rolled with it.

I’m not sure I have enough information to spot anything problematic about the secular woman who’s forced to flee NYC. If she’s secular but still has a strong Jewish identity, having her flee to another place with the kind of heavy Jewish presence as NYC would ring true. That way she’ll still be able to get the foods she craves, be around people like her if she runs into period-accurate discrimination, etc. I’m not sure what those places would be in 1920 but my gut is saying “Big cities and possibly Charleston, SC.” If you want me to delve into that more and can’t find it on your own, send a separate ask just saying “where were the Jewish enclaves in 1920’s North America.”

As for what kinds of interesting observations the Orthodox woman could make about her new environment that sound detective-y, I guess make a list of all the things that would be different between shtetl life and NYC at that time period – she’s probably not encountered Italians before, for example – and then go down the list and pick all the ones that don’t make her look like a jerk? I mean, she’s gonna notice a heck of a lot besides just “that woman is showing parts of her body my culture doesn’t show.”

–Shira

stringsofredcurrants-deactivate  asked:

I hope this is okay to ask here (please ignore if not) -- I'm Jewish and I'd really like to read more books that have a Jewish main character/s or that feature Jewish life. I'm finding it really hard to find books that feature day to day Jewish life without them dissecting Judaism or being in some way about the Shoah, if that makes sense. I guess I was mostly looking for books that normalise being Jewish somehow and I wondered if you had any recommendations?

A Wide Variety of Jewish Fiction Not Set in 1940′s Europe

It’s more than okay because I totally feel this. And it can be hard to find ourselves in contemporary lit because if the story isn’t about Jewishness or a character isn’t terribly observant, the book’s blurb and keywords often give us no hints. Meanwhile, gentile authors love to plop us down in the middle of our most famous mass tragedy, when there’s so much more to us.

So I am really glad that I can help. All of the following links go directly to my reviews, which are pretty detailed and should give you an idea if the book sounds like something you’d like.

Starting with YA, I recommend Playing with Matches (Modern Orthodox setting, about a girl trying to repair her relationship with her older sister and accidentally starting a matchmaking service) and My Year Zero (all girl love triangle.) Additionally, one of the two main characters in Gone, Gone Gone (all boy love triangle, but also about the trauma of living through the 2002 sniper crisis in Maryland) is Jewish.

Leading characters, although not the MC, of YA superstars Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda and The Rest of Us Just Live Here, are Jewish. All of those have a contemporary setting; for historical f/f YA there is the short story The Fire-Eater’s Daughter, which is set in the 1950′s in a circus and has a Jewish lead. (With that time setting: her mom is a survivor but that’s not what the story is about.)

For graphic novels, I highly recommend the Rabbi Harvey books (philosophical/funny, setting some of our legends in the American Old West),The Rabbi’s Cat (philosophical/dark; this one kinda has some of that dissection you were trying to avoid), and the Mirka books (children’s fantasy about a lot of female characters in an Orthodox setting.) And I loved the two Jewish stories in the Dates LGBTQ+ comics anthology, both of which had trans characters.

Libi Astaire’s written a number of Regency mysteries set in London’s Jewish community, both short stories and full length. My favorite was The Doppelganger’s Dance, about a violinist being gaslit by a mysterious anonymous rival, and here’s a review of one of the shorts, “What’s in a Flame?” Speaking of historicals, Heather Rose Jones’s 1800′s lesbian fantasy series introduced well-rounded Jewish characters in its second book, The Mystic Marriage, which is about lesbian scientists creating magic rocks (the Jewish characters are the alchemist’s young apprentice and her father.)

Romance can be a minefield for us but here are some books I can endorse:True Pretenses (Regency m/f, Jewish author), Think of England (Edwardian m/m suspense, gentile author.)

For short, free Jewish sci-fi online I recommend Three Partitions (nonbinary, Orthodox) and Seven Commentaries on an Imperfect Land. Grand Jeté also fits these categories but is much darker (so not as much my personal preference.)

Finally, I hope you will consider checking out my own series, which is fluffy queer fantasy set in a made-up Jewish kingdom based on South Florida where I grew up. There are three novels and two short stories published so far with @torquerepress, with a fourth book and five more shorts coming this July. A good place to start is the two Tales from Outer Lands (the shorts), because they make a good intro and focus the most on the Jewishness. This free five-panel comic I wrote with @theloserfish makes another good preview; it’s about the queen’s girlfriend trying to bake gluten-free challah with the help of the palace wizard.

–Shira

Children In Church

Little girls should wear nice dresses and dress shoes. Even from infancy, their heads should be covered. Some people who are misinformed about Orthodox tradition may try to tell you that girls do not need to wear a scarf or hat until they are twelve. Perhaps this has become confused with the age children are usually confirmed into the Roman Catholic Church or they think that the head covering somehow signals to the community that the girl will soon be available for marriage.

Whatever the source of the misconception, it has no basis in Orthodox tradition whatsoever. Girls and women should arrive at Church with their heads covered, stand throughout the service with their heads covered, and leave Church the same way. This is done for spiritual purposes concerning modesty and humility. Therefore, do not be misled into believing that the headcovering needs to be worn only when confessing or communing (another popular myth).


Presbytera Juliana Cownie

jewish tumblrs list

will have rolling updates and be on my sidebar. to be on the list see here

  1. wenevergotusedtoegypt - Orthodox (Chabad) - A personal blog mostly about Judaism and baal teshuva issues. 
  2. aniacshav - i’m in the process of converting through a conservative shul, and my blog is mostly jewish history/culture with some personal stuff thrown in, mostly about jewish identity and lgbtq+ stuff
  3. emperor-of-matzah - Not too much on faith, i’m secular. I focus a lot on Jewish history, languages, food, culture, etc.
  4. everafterbreathedisaster - Conservative Jew. This blog is mostly a bunch of bands and humor posts with social-justice and activism mixed in.
  5. acejews - multiperson blog w/ mods of varying observances - a safe space for all ace-spectrum jews, whether jewish by patrilineality, matrilineality, or conversion (past, or if you’re currently in the process)
  6. arothejew - a Chabad/Chassidic Rabbinical Student, who runs a jewish blog in his spare time from yeshiva. I’m especially open to give advice and answer questions - judaism, jewish law, spirituality. Even if I don’t know the answer to the question, I am surrounded by Jewish scholars (rabbis) of incredible caliber who can also help get your questions answered.
  7. believebeluga - reform Jewish - primarily a wildlife-centric blog, but I also bring up social rights issues and Judaism pretty frequently. 
  8. @sapphic-krogan - reform Ashkenazi Jew, and I post a multitude of things but as for Jewish stuff it’s mostly about Jews in fiction, Jews in current events, and responses to antisemitism.
  9. zeeziegallifrey -  Conservadox-Reconstructionish! (Ask me about it :) ) - A wild mix of Judaism, cats, well-tagged fandom, and living with chronic illness. Very much here for baking and interfaith work!
  10. shomermitzvah - Modern Orthodox. If you need to be more specific than that, I’m on the machmir side (ie. closer to yeshivish modern than conservadox on the modern orthodox scale). - My blog is mostly Jewish, but I also blog personal stuff.
  11. angryaliens - somewhere between conservative and reform - blog is photography with some sj and a bit of jewish stuff
  12. marxistdivreitorah - Reconstructionist divrei torah on the weekly torah portion from a Marxist point of view
  13. girloverhere - American-Charedi (Right-Wing Orthodox) :)
  14. rookieconvert -  I’m converting to Judaism in a mainly Modern Orthodox synagogue. I post personal stuff, social justice stuff and LGBT stuff. I have a ‘judaism tag’, 'convert stuff’ tag and a 'shul tag’! 
  15. argumentativeandjewish - Chabad perspective
  16. mixedjudaism - orthodox, but with no real affiliation to any denomination - a space for jews of mixed race/ethnicity to talk about their experiences within jewish spaces and their identity.
  17. shiraglassman - I’m Reform Jewish and I tend to post/reblog content relevant to queer-positive Judaism, including the Jewish characters in my books.
  18. @thetomatofaerie (i’ve tried like 8 times to tag them and it’s not working? anyway the link is here) - I’m Reform, and I blog a lot about Jewish history and Jewish culture/heritage, especially from a Russian Jewish perspective. I also like talking about fashion, fairytales/fantasy, and literature.
  19. shabbosfemme - I was raised Reconstructionist-Renewal, and my blog is mostly personal stuff and social justice posts, but Judaism absolutely fits in with that.
  20. scriblonza - mostly a personal blog, but seeing that practicing Judaism (Orthodox) is a rather large part of my person, I post/reblog about that as well
  21. directed-energy - I post radical left/anarchist jewish activist & cultural stuff along with queer activism, art, and silly posts about superheroes :)
  22. facingthenorthwind - i’m converting through a progressive shul in australia, mostly a personal blog but since judaism is a big part of my life, it comes up fairly frequently.
  23. he-harim - modern-orthodox-ish BT (originally non-observant). mainly personal-Jewish.
  24. so-much-depends-upon-a  same as above, the other blog of torat-chesed. this blog focuses on the sociological side of judaism – jewish posts here will mainly be about antisemitism. not primarily a jewish blog.
  25. schemingreader - I do not identify as Orthodox, though I am observant and keep Shabbat. I belong to a non-denominational havurah w/ no mehitzah. I’m deeply interested in halachic discussions, but I can never take a frum perspective. (I do bring a middle-aged mom’s perspective, which perhaps has some value.)
  26. bennistar - In Real life: A regular Chassidish yeshiva bochur from one of the chassidic courts in Eretz Yisroel. On Tumblr: Known as the Tambler Rebbe blogging mainly about Judaism, Torah/Chassidic thoughts, daily life in the Hasidic world and some Jewish music
  27. reachabovethetrees - British Liberal Judaism perspective. About half way through my conversion, and am a personal blog on my way towards blogging more about jewish culture and religion.
  28. lachaim - I am reform, and I reblog a lot of Jewish content that I agree with or want to spread awareness about. Otherwise, I follow a few marvel fandoms and other things relevant to my life.
  29. feministrhymeswithwitch - I was raised modern orthodox but I identify more with conservative and I do a ton of angry Jewish blogging :3
  30. ceaseand-exist - conservative Jew from the US. I started as a One Direction blog but also post frequently about Jewish culture and anti-semitism. Strong pro-Israel focus.
  31. life-chats - I’m west-coast US Reform, and my blog is a pretty even mix of personal stuff and politics/feminism, including a healthy amount of content on Jewish pride/jokes/politics/oppression.
  32. a-cute-potsexual - i’m reform, and my blog is a lot of social justice and humor
  33. faefemme - I blog about Judaism, antisemitism and other social justice issues, art history, and personal matters. I’m reform currently, but I might be looking into a conservative synagogue soon.
  34. voeu-a-l-univers - Sephardi Jew. I usually post things that interests a young Jew in Europe. But also our struggles to live in a society that killed our ancestors not long a go.
  35. kgwriter - orthodox, mostly focused on fandoms and things that make me laugh, but i occasionally post/reblog things about jewishness, judaism, and antisemitism in the modern world
  36. queerkavod - Raised Conservative. A blend of Judaism, social justice, queer positivity, and art.
  37. antisemitic - Cultural Ashkenazi and Mizrachi jew - I talk about Jewish culture and tradition and antisemitism. It’s my own personal blog too so there is a bit of everything
  38. battlships - adopted Reform Jew (so I’m technically a convert) - Mostly I reblog and add to stuff other Jewish bloggers post (sprinkled through fandom and personal stuff). 
  39. thelastplaceweleftoff - modern orthodox, half Israeli-Moroccan - I blog mostly about bands (I always tag), social justice, and the Jewish stuff I do blog about are either positive memes or current events/antisemitism.
  40. chayehshoshana - a 19-year-old Conservative Jewish girl - I post pretty much exclusively about Judaism with some personal posts interspersed.
  41. jusnothin - orthodox girl - likes to post photos of the kosher food she cooks and things that i think are cool in general.
  42. wearingoutthereplay - Reform Jewish girl - posting about fandom, various jumblr things &, my writing & social justice (especially LGBT+)
  43. journey2judaism - converting to Reform Judaism but my beliefs lie somewhere between conservative and reform - I mostly post about Judaism but with other stuff in there too (beauty/fashion, activism, feminism, photography, certain TV shows and books)
  44. jewishthottie - reform jewish girl of ashkenazic descent - this is a semi personal blog but i post a lot about jewish culture, history, politics, etc!!
  45. the-jewish-asexual - modern orthodox - I usually post stuff relating to Judaism, and I am a proud pro-zionist
  46. jewish-privilege - mods are Reform Jewish and atheist Jewish (raised Orthodox) - we cover Jewish solidarity, and Jewish history and culture, especially in dealing with antisemitism
  47. patrickohenry - dati leumi–Israeli modern orthodox - Jewish content is Jewish/Israeli inspired poetry but will be adding more talmudic content in the near future!
  48. schnappbacks - somewhere between conservative and modern orthodox - the blog is basically military stuff, things I find funny, and Judaism. every now and then I’ll post from my extensive collection of obscure Jewish jokes
  49. @nightseas - reform Jew and my blog is multi-topic - fandom, religion, social justice, personal
  50. jacob-the-pianist -  Chabad-affiliated Modern Orthodox Zionist - Raised Conservative, became BT through high school and college- my blog’s mostly dedicated to my many MANY fandoms, but I also post stuff about Israel, halacha, Torah, and Chabad Chassidus.
  51. pissyghostie -  converting to Conservative Judaism - mostly a social justice and annoying humor blog with the more-than-occasional impassioned personal post.
  52. elviscostellojr - im reform/conservative romaniote and im 1daf (but i blog a lot about jewish things n music n stuff)
  53. hey-miss-teacher-lady - I’m reform/reconstructionist and my blog is personal-ish with mostly rants about life, my experiences as a student teacher (working towards my Masters in Education), the occasional silly meme/fandom reblog, and Jewish stuff.
  54. feministrugelach - I’m a conservative Jew, but my more distant family is modern orthodox and I may drift more towards that when i get older, I’m not sure. this is my personal blog, I reblog some leftist politics, and jewish things I like, support, or find inspirational.
  55. koleliana -  Orthodox - blog mostly about conversion issues!
  56. skywritingg - conservadox-in-process - personal blog with a growing percentage of Jewish content because I love it.
  57. thisqueerjewishlife - raised Reform but transitioning into a more Conservative/Conservadox lifestyle - I mostly write about my thoughts and experiences as a queer Jewish person.
  58. @sadiqim - Reform-Reconstructionst Ashkenazi Jewish woman who posts a combination of fandom, radical/marxist politics and religious dialogue
  59. @greetingsfriend - culturally ashkenazi, grew up reformed - this is my personal blog, so there’s a whole smorgasbord of stuff, but i often reblog from and low-key engage with the jumblr community
  60. @nerapalooza - a trans Jew who became more religious in college and participate in liberal movements but with no particular affiliation - my personal blog but I have a tag for jumblr and a link to that tag in my sidebar for people wanting to look only at Jewish related posts. Blog is queer/trans friendly and pro-Israel.
  61. @love-you-a-latke - reform judaism
  62. @heeb-y - liberal Zionist and my personal religious beliefs fall somewhere between conservative and reform - I blog about fashion, music (rap n indie mostly), politics, and Judaism.
  63. @faithfulimage - liberal in theology and moderate in practice. - A sometimes personal blog that is mostly about Judaism and being a working class, Jewish, trans, lesbian woman, an adoptee, and a victim of abuse.
  64. @childofbenjamin - Orthodox (modern leaning) - I mostly blog about Zionism and anti-Semitism.
  65. @matan-matika - Conservative Jew - This blog focuses on a mix of math, linguistics, and Judaism.
  66. @goldhornsandsteel - a general Israeli/Jewish Atheist rage blog
  67. @janothar​ - atheist Humanistic Jew (who sometimes hangs out in Conservative and Reform groups) - my blog is very broad, lots of anti-antisemitism, and soon I’ll be leading what we’re calling “The Magneto Seminar”
  68. @tooshulforschool - I blog from an atheist/secular Jew perspective
  69. @pretentiousyid - modern orthodox - Hebrew school teacher and judaics and art director at the jcc in bham alabama.
  70. @wcjp - conservative ideology but attends a reconstructionist synagogue out of ease of access - my blog is a mix of my personal thoughts regarding conversion and judaism, and i reblog general history, social justice, analysis and other things related to judaism
  71. @conversion-theory - Reconstructionist Conversion Student - Neurodiverse LGBTQ Person who sideblogs learning about judaism.
  72. @bannvck - Conservative Judaism - I run a semi-personal blog about my conversion, schooling, and Indigenous + Jewish issues
  73. @progressivejudaism - although I am a Reform Rabbinical student, I try also include other lenses within the Progressive Jewish community
  74. @mugglehistory - I’m a Modern Orthodox frum girl who posts about Jewish history and culture - I’m happy to share an Orthodox perspective on things, and chat to conversion students. (:
  75. @alternativetodiscourse - Orthodox/Modern Orthodox - Jewish content only, stuff about the parsha a lot, Jewish memes, and hypothetical/supernatural Halacha. 
  76. @sdhs-rationalist - I’m from a modern orthodoxish background(my family had a partnership Minyan in our basement for a while, if that helps localize my upbringing on the spectrum). - I’m at Maale Gilboa for the year and I post about that every so often, as well as answering halachic And Talmudic questions I get or that I see on my dash and can answer.
  77. @jitm - Old chassidic (meaning stringently observant, mystical etc.) with modern leanings (meaning using Tumblr) - Basically a self-imposed exile like Rebs Zusha and Elimelech, to the land of Israel, where I post my situations, thoughts, insight, torah, etc.
  78. @trans-jewish-boi - reconstructionist - my blog is still super new but im going to blog about judaism, books and lgbt issues
  79. @littleblueray - converting through a reform rabbi at a reformative shul - I post mainly about my observance, Judaism, and life. Im disabled, volunteer at s hospital and am a college student majoring in criminal justice. :-) gd bless