orthocone

2

First appearing in a Fossil Pokemon Reserve on a small Alolan island, this variation of Omastar is now thought to be far more ancient a species than the current standard. Instead of a helix, its shell is a massive cone. Sharp at both ends and capable of propelling itself at high speeds using strong blasts of water, this titanic fossil was the apex predator of its ocean home. Wheras the standard Omastar left no descendants, this variation may well be the ancestor of all Cephalopod Pokemon.


First appearing in a Fossil Pokemon Reserve on a small Alolan island, this variation of Kabutops is now thought to be far more ancient a species than the current standard. Its only limbs are forearms ending in huge, scissor-like talons, designed to slice through the armor of prey like a hot knife through butter. Whereas the standard Kabutops left no descendants, this variant may well be the ancestor of all Arachnid Pokemon.


Surprise! A two-for this time, and a fun change of pace from drawing Dinosaurs for PokeJurassic Park. And right back to Dinosaurs after this.

Omastar is based off of an Orthocone, and Kabutops a Eurypterid like Brontoscorpio.

Also Brand-new Commission prices are up here, if you are interested.

anonymous asked:

Dear Lady helix. Are nautilus descendant of our dear lord helix and you? Thank you and Praise Lord Helix!

Hello anon!

To answer your question directly, no, a nautilus

is not a descendant of an ammonite

(both of these are my beautiful bbys)

However, they are somewhat closely related. Within the class Cephalopoda, there are three sublcasses: the Coleoidea (squids, cuttlefish and octopus), the Nautiloidea (a diverse but mainly extinct group, with the exception of the modern day nautilus species) and the entirely extinct Ammonoidea, which of course includes the ammonites, and lord helix himself.

In fact, it is thought that both the Coeloidea and the Ammonoidea are descended from a particular group within the Nautiloidea, kind of opposite to what your question asked!

But like I said, though it’s not apparent today, the Nautiloids were a huge diverse group back in the palaeozoic day, and included not only those similar to the living reclict nautilus species, but also a variety of other forms, including the straight shelled orthocones (which in turn included this huge bastard)

Spiral shelled nautilids and ammonites superficially look very similar, however, there are key differences, for example, the siphuncle (a thread of flesh that runs through the animal’s shell, used growing the shell, and also for controlling water/gass input/output within the shell chambers i.e. controlling buoyancy) runs through the centre of a nautilid shell, as apposed to along the outer edge of an ammonite shell. There are also differences in the number of chambers within the shell, suture shape separating champers, and the fact that ammonites were thought to be able to completely retract within their shells - nautilids (at least living day ones) cannot.

anyway both groups are really super cool and I like cephalopods a lot, I hope that answered your question!