original post belongs to

9

@unknowndaughterofnothing‘s PJO icons!

Experimenting with colour schemes and matching dark colours is TOUGH, let me tell you that.  I hope you like the icons, I attempted to make them creepier than they already were (which was also really tough since they’re amazing).

[THIS IS FOR MY 300 FOLLOWER CELEBRATION.  I STILL HAVE SPOTS OPEN FOR REQUESTS SO, LOOK AT THE ORIGINAL POST HERE TO GET INFORMATION ON HOW TO REQUEST.]

(art belongs to the lovely @tamaytka, seriously love her style and how creepy these guys look.)

(note, the dark!Will was not originally in the evil/dark set and had to be ‘evil-fied’  you’re welcome.)

Y’all loved Paladin Danse-Senpai, right?  Then let me show you something.

This is my contribution to the Fallout 4 fandom and I hope you will like it as much as I do @smokeauditore & @bloodymarietv :D

Now everyone get ready for… The “Notice me Sole-Senpai! Squad”

With its number one fanboy… Paladin Danse-Senpai!

                                  «Outstanding»

Followed by our loyal nanny…Codsworth-Kouhai!

«Even at the worst of times, things aren’t so bad when                                        you’re around, Sole-Senpai.»

A round of applause for… Preston-Kouhai!

«A settlement needs your help, General-Senpai. Here, I’ll mark it on your map.»

She’s square but beautiful…Ada-Kouhai! 

«Traveling with Sole-Senpai has proven to be quite…uplifting.»

Who’s a good boy? Who’s a good boooyy? Yes you are! Give a hug to this fluffy benediction…Dogmeat-Kouhai!

                                              «Bark! Bark!»

That girl sure knows how to get herself in trouble… Piper-Kouhai!

«Thanks again for sharing your story, Blue-Senpai. I’ll make sure no one forgets what happened.»

Let’s not forget our favorite detective… Nick-Kouhai! 

  «Well, if it isn’t my favorite former icicle, Sole-Senpai!»

That girl is an ass kicker…Cait-Kouhai!

«I know this must be difficult for you… I… I’m here if you need to talk, Sole-Senpai.» 

An angel who fell from heaven…Curie-Kouhai!

«It is so hard to wrap my head around what I feel for Sole-Senpai. Before, there was only duty. Now, something more.»

He stole many hearts and is kind of a badass… Hancock-Kouhai!

«Come on, Sole-Senpai! Let’s get this freakshow on the road.»

Is he really a synth or is it just another lie? Deacon-Kouhai! 

«This will be our finest hour, Sole-Senpai. Tales shall be told of our fight versus the rad roaches.»

He became what he hated the most as a child, a mungo… Maccready-Kouhai!

«For once in my life, everything’s going right and I have you to thank for it, Sole-Senpai.»

Gotta find that human milk…Strong-Kouhai!

«Sole-Senpai good leader. Better than Fist. Strong follow you always.»

The guy is more comfortable shooting people, than talking to them… X6-88-Kouhai!

«Yes, Sole-Senpai. Designation X6-88. I’ve already neutralized the perimeter guard. When you’re ready, we can move on the main flotilla.»

There goes our favorite raider… Gage-Kouhai!

«So far, you make a pretty good Overboss, Sole-Senpai, and it’s been fun running with you.»

He’s old but he can still kick your ass… Old Longfellow-Kouhai!

«You’ve got some grit, Sole-Senpai, I’ll give you that. Can’t say that about most folks I know.»

BONUS:

Elder Maxson-Senpai!

«You truly have become one of us, Sole-Senpai!» 

Knight Rhys-Kouhai!

«I can usually size people up a glance but you, Sole-Senpai…you’re different. And it’s bugging the heck out of me.»

And my favorite, the one and only one… Dovan my Sole-Senpai!

«I know my words aren’t worth nothing but crap to you, but let me give you an advice i should’ve followed myself when I was younger. Killing won’t bring your loved ones back. Killing won’t bring you peace. It is a poison that devours you from the inside until it is too late to be treated.»

*******************************************************************************************

Now, I am kinda curious to know what your Sole-Senpai looks like and what’s their own favorite quote. Please feel free to post pictures of your Sole-Senpai and their kouhai! :D 

Use the tag #SoleSenpai if you want to do this ^0^ I swear this is probably one of the best ideas I ever got.

***Every single screenshots in this post are mines except the Danse ones who originally belongs to @smokeauditore and I had a great time at making them more “kawaii”*** (I literally forgot to mention it. I’m sorry >o<)

We Need to Talk About Vikturio


…and the people who still think it involves some kind of paraphilia.

I’ll be very clear here:

Pedophilia is, etymologically speaking, made of pedo and philia, both words that come from Ancient Greek.

Pedo is a prefix used on anything related to children. And philia, we know it, is a suffix that means “love”.

According to the DSM-V, pedophilia is the adult sexual interest in prepubscent children.

Prepubescent children.

Normally, kids enter puberty around 10, 11, 12, but it doesn’t go beyond 13.

Yura is 16.

Now, let’s take a look on what many Vikturio shippers use as a defense: Ephebophilia.

Ephebos, in Acient Greek, means something similar to “arriving to puberty”.

Ephebophilia is NOT listed as a mental disorder by the DSM-V, simply because it’s the name given to “the primary or exclusive adult sexual interest in mid-to-late adolescents, generally ages 15 to 19”, according to Richard von Krafft-Ebing in his Psychopathia Sexualis.

Again, Yura is 16.

Even so, Victor would not have ephebophilia in a Vikturio context. Know why?

Because sexual interest for adolescents is described by Krafft-Ebing as only categorizing ephebophilia if it is primary or exclusive. Just the fact that a sexual attraction exists doesn’t make it ephebophilia, it has to be unique. Victor would have to be attracted only by teens.

Definitely not his case.

Moral of the story: No one is right, except for those who ship responsibly, respect their neighboor’s ships and don’t post hate on those ships’ tags.

That’s what I ask with this post. Please stop the hate. Please.

——————————————–

original post belongs to @circussetsuna

The Signs Go To Hell

Note: THIS is where the original content in this post belongs to! I got confused as I thought someone else had made this. Credit to the original author for being funny as heck!

Aries: Screams “FUCK YEA” and jumps into a pool of magma to wrestle Leo

Taurus: *Walks around for 1 second* “NOPE” they scream while running away

Gemini: *intentionally knocks over jars of evil souls that escape to the surface world* Whoops

Cancer: Went to Heaven, they’re too innocent for Hell.

Leo: Jumps into a magma pool saying “Home sweet home”

Virgo: Scoffs at how dirty it is, and frequently dusts anything before touching it

Libra: Takes a selfie with satan because they can

Scorpio: Forms a plan to overthrow Satan and become the queen/king of hell.

Sagittarius: Literally befriends the demons there and teaches them how to Salsa

Capricorn: “I DID NOT SIGN UP FOR THIS SHIT”

Aquarius: *looks around for a few minutes* “Can i go home now”

Pisces: Cautiously walks around, ends up falling in a pit of magma

DO NOT USE OR REPOST MY ARTWORK WITHOUT MY PERMISSION!

A fake screenshot of a scene from @alainaprana‘s Momma CQ comic! I recently started reading I and aaaa It’s amazing ;0;

Original post link!

this beautiiful thing~

Error belongs to @loverofpiggies

Ink belongs to @comyet!

The Beatles Creations Network is now accepting new Members!

The Beatles Creations Network was designed for one purpose: celebrating the creative minds of the Beatles fandom.  This network will serve as a place for writers, artists, and editors to share their work and receive the recognition they deserve.

Do you Qualify?

The Beatles Creations Network welcomes anyone who creates original work (including fanfiction, fanart, gifs, edits, or graphics).  In order to join, you must meet the following criteria:

  • Your work should be original and created by you.  This means scans and interview transcriptions do not qualify.  Additionally, users who have a history of reposting original work (i.e., posting gifs or artwork that does not belong to you) will not be allowed to join.
  • Your work can not contain offensive images or messages.
  • You can be a multifandom blog, however this network will only feature your Beatle related work.

Benefits of Being a Member:

Your blog will be featured in our directory of Beatles Artisans. All members will have full access to our network activities that we host  to encourage creativity and reward the hard work of our members.  Your work and blog  will always be featured and promoted on the network blog, and you may even make some new friends.

How to Join:

Questions?

okay so, there’s going to be some inactivity in regards to posting for a while and this is basically because my phone was stolen today during my 1st period..

basically, both my phone and money (roughly $50+) and my friend’s phone was stolen today.. i tried reporting it to our campus police but they couldn’t catch them in time so i don’t really think i’ll be getting it back, at least not anytime soon.

not to mention, the girl that stole our belongings (i found out who had our stuff during 4th period, but she gave them away to the person that originally had our belongings, so she wasn’t caught) posted videos of her and her friends eating pizza (that they bought using my money).. 

in addition, our ASB advisor found my phone case on the floor near the locker rooms so i’m assuming they took it off so that it would make my phone look “new” so they could profit from it..

i’m not necessarily annoyed with the fact that i won’t be posting for a while but i’m irritated with the fact that they went through my belongings and stole my phone and money, so this was just an FYI as to what happened.

thanks for understanding.

10

Contrary to popular belief, many Latin Americans do not have surnames that are of Castilian (Spanish) or Portuguese origin, just as many people from the United States do not posses surnames that are of English origin. [Part l]

Above: Celebrities from Latin America with surnames that are not of Castilian or Portuguese origin [from left to right]:

1. Salma Hayek, Mexican with a Lebanese surname;

2. Keiko Sofía Fujimori Higuchi, Peruvian with two Japanese surnames;

3. Norfalia Carabalí, Colombian with a surname that originates with the Kalabari people of Nigeria;

4.Ezequiel Lavezzi, Argentine with an Italian surname;

5. Fernando Aristeguieta, Venezuelan with a Basque surname;

6. Francisco Lachowski, Brazilian with a Polish surname;

7. Ollanta Humala, Peruvian with an Indigenous Quechua surname;

8. William Levy, Cuban with a Hebrew surname;

9. Carla Constanza Peterson, Argentine with a Swedish surname;

10. Scharllette Allen, Nicaraguan with a Scottish surname.

________________________________________________________

When the Iberians colonized Latin America, they began to force conversion to Catholicism onto the Indigenous populations of the areas they conquered. After an Indigenous person was baptized, they were assigned a Castilian or Portuguese surname, to signify a new life distanced from their pagan roots. The same fate befell the enslaved Africans that were brought to the Americas by the Spaniards and Portuguese. After the colonial era many Latin American countries started to receive a myriad of immigrants; mostly from Europe, but also from Asia, the West Indies, and the United States. Countless of these immigrants would Iberianize their surnames in order to assimilate smoothly, examples of this can be seen with the German immigrants who came to Brazil; names such as Birnbaum, Löwe, Zimmermann, Frazen were changed to Pereira, Leão, Simão, and França. For all the reasons mentioned above, the majority of Latin Americans (not including the Francophone regions) these days have Castilian or Portuguese surnames.

However, a significant number of Latin Americans have managed to resist the adoption of Portuguese and Castilian surnames.

Indigenous surnames can be frequently found in countries with large unmixed Amerindian populations, an example of this is Peru where surnames such as Quispe, Huamán, Mamani are some of the most frequent. In southern Mexico and Guatemala names of Mayan origin such as: Tecú, Tuyub, Zum, Xuluc, Tun, Canché, Tuyuc, Curruchich, Choc, and Xicara; are also commonly found.

West and Central African originated surnames can be found in areas of the Pacific coast of Colombia and Ecuador where the African-descended populations have been historically isolated. They can also be found in the Caribbean regions of Colombia, Venezuela, and the Caribbean islands. Cuba is an example of this as it was the last nation in the Caribbean region to abolish slavery, and many of the enslaved Africans brought in the latter parts of the colonial era were not strictly enforced to accept their Christian surnames, so they would adopt ones that signified the tribe or region they descended from such as Boni, Carabalí, Biafara, and Cumbá.  

Nonetheless, the most common surnames that aren’t Castilian or Portuguese in origin, are those belonging to the descendants of post colonial immigrants. Although many immigrants Iberianized their surnames, others chose not to. The first wave of immigrants came from regions of Spain that weren’t traditionally part of the colonizing Castilian-speaking areas (which includes Castile/Andalusia/Extramdura) such as the Basque, Catalan, and Galician lands. Surnames from these sub-ethnic groups can be found throughout Latin America in abundance, but especially in Cuba, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Venezuela, Mexico, Colombia and even Brazil the countries which received the most post-colonial immigrants from Spain. Furthermore, immigrants from outside of Spain(and Portugual) began to migrate to Latin America in latter waves, most coming from Europe: mainly Italy, Germany, France, and Eastern Europe and most settling in the countries mentioned previously. In Argentina, Southern Brazil, and Uruguay; Italian, German, and Slavic surnames are almost as common as Iberian ones and in some areas even more common. Immigrants also came from Western and East Asia, namely Christian Arabs from Lebanon/Syria and Japanese people. Indentured laborers were brought to places like Peru and Cuba, most of them being of Chinese background. West Indian migrants to Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala (when these nations Caribbean coasts were British protectorate’s) and Panama (during the building of the Panama Canal) brought with them a multitude of British and Irish surnames as well. For this reason, many of the descendants of all these migrants mentioned above, still bear the surnames of their ancestors, despite historical pressures to assimilate/change them. 

10

Contrary to popular belief, many Latin Americans do not have surnames that are of Castilian (Spanish) or Portuguese origin, just as many people from the United States do not posses surnames that are of English origin. [Part ll]

Above: Celebrities from Latin America with surnames that are not of Castilian or Portuguese origin [from left to right]:

1. Dilma Rousseff, Brazilian with a Bulgarian surname;

2. Rigoberta Menchú Tum, Guatemalan with an Indigenous Mayan surname;

3. Yumileidi Cumbá, Cuban with a surname that originates with the Mandinka people of West Africa;

4.Bruce Kastulo Chen, Panamanian with a Chinese surname;

5. David Nalbandian, Argentine with an Armenian surname;

6.Juan Soler Valls Quiroga, Argentine with a Catalan surname;

7. Montserrat Oliver, Mexican with a French surname;

8. Armando Cooper, Panamanian with English surname;

9. Karin Roepke, Brazilian with German surname;

10. Catharina Choi Nunes, Brazilian with Korean surname.

_______________________________________________________

When the Iberians colonized Latin America, they began to force conversion to Catholicism onto the Indigenous populations of the areas they conquered. After an Indigenous person was baptized, they were assigned a Castilian or Portuguese surname, to signify a new life distanced from their pagan roots. The same fate befell the enslaved Africans that were brought to the Americas by the Spaniards and Portuguese. After the colonial era many Latin American countries started to receive a myriad of immigrants; mostly from Europe, but also from Asia, the West Indies, and the United States. Countless of these immigrants would Iberianize their surnames in order to assimilate smoothly, examples of this can be seen with the German immigrants who came to Brazil; names such as Birnbaum, Löwe, Zimmermann, Frazen were changed to Pereira, Leão, Simão, and França. For all the reasons mentioned above, the majority of Latin Americans (not including the Francophone regions) these days have Castilian or Portuguese surnames.

However, a significant number of Latin Americans have managed to resist the adoption of Portuguese and Castilian surnames.

Indigenous surnames can be frequently found in countries with large unmixed Amerindian populations, an example of this is Peru where surnames such as Quispe, Huamán, Mamani are some of the most frequent. In southern Mexico and Guatemala names of Mayan origin such as: Tecú, Tuyub, Zum, Xuluc, Tun, Canché, Tuyuc, Curruchich, Choc, and Xicara; are also commonly found.

West and Central African originated surnames can be found in areas of the Pacific coast of Colombia and Ecuador where the African-descended populations have been historically isolated. They can also be found in the Caribbean regions of Colombia, Venezuela, and the Caribbean islands. Cuba is an example of this as it was the last nation in the Caribbean region to abolish slavery, and many of the enslaved Africans brought in the latter parts of the colonial era were not strictly enforced to accept their Christian surnames, so they would adopt ones that signified the tribe or region they descended from such as Boni, Carabalí, Biafara, and Cumbá.  

Nonetheless, the most common surnames that aren’t Castilian or Portuguese in origin, are those belonging to the descendants of post colonial immigrants. Although many immigrants Iberianized their surnames, others chose not to. The first wave of immigrants came from regions of Spain that weren’t traditionally part of the colonizing Castilian-speaking areas (which includes Castile/Andalusia/Extramdura) such as the Basque, Catalan, and Galician lands. Surnames from these sub-ethnic groups can be found throughout Latin America in abundance, but especially in Cuba, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Venezuela, Mexico, Colombia and even Brazil the countries which received the most post-colonial immigrants from Spain. Furthermore, immigrants from outside of Spain(and Portugual) began to migrate to Latin America in latter waves, most coming from Europe: mainly Italy, Germany, France, and Eastern Europe and most settling in the countries mentioned previously. In Argentina, Southern Brazil, and Uruguay; Italian, German, and Slavic surnames are almost as common as Iberian ones and in some areas even more common. Immigrants also came from Western and East Asia, namely Christian Arabs from Lebanon/Syria and Japanese people. Indentured laborers were brought to places like Peru and Cuba, most of them being of Chinese background. West Indian migrants to Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala (when these nations Caribbean coasts were British protectorate’s) and Panama (during the building of the Panama Canal) brought with them a multitude of British and Irish surnames as well. For this reason, many of the descendants of all these migrants mentioned above, still bear the surnames of their ancestors, despite historical pressures to assimilate/change them.