origin: ancient greek

What if Atlantis is just a Greek wizarding school.

Muggles originally knew of the island in Ancient Greek times, but then as new spells and magic was created, muggles thought it sank/mysteriously disappeared, after anti muggle spells were cast on the island to hide the school.

Another anecdote from Greek class: 

Apparently there’s an episode in the Bible where Jesus asks Peter “Do you love me?” using a form of the verb ἀγαπάω, which means ‘love’ but in like the cosmic, religious sense of the word. And Peter says yes but he uses the word φιλέω, which is also ‘love’ but in a much more general casual way, so basically Jesus Christ Son of God asks Peter if he loves him and Peter says, “Yeah, as a friend.”

Thoughts on Patroclus

Friendly reminder that Patroclus should not be remember simply as “Achilles’ bitch”.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was a little shit. He had the power, the looks and the skills, and he knew it. Not only he excelled at battle; he did it while taunting his enemies all the fucking time cause he was going to win and he knew it.

Friendly reminder that he was the one guy who got to call out on Achilles, something no one else dared to do. In fact, men went to ask him to call out on Achilles because everyone was scared of him. Except for Patroclus.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus had advanced medical knowledge, something extremly rare at the time. He healed many of his friends and comrades during battle. Hadn’t it been for him, many great warriors would have died.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was loyal to a fault. He was always by Achilles’ side in battle. He never disobeyed Achilles orders. The one time he did, was the time he died.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was kind and had a soft heart. He cried because while Achilles’ Rage lasted, he wouldn’t let any of his men enter battle, Patroclus included. And while Achilles’ troops were hiding in their ships, the rest of the Greek army got crushed. Patroclus felt so powerless and helpless because he couldn’t do nothing as he saw his comrades dying.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus had a character crisis. He had to decide whether obeying his Lord’s commands and abandoning his friends in battle, or going against his Lord’s wishes and engaging fight.

Friendly reminder that he refused to stay behind like a coward. He chose to enter battle, but since he was a honourable man he told Achilles about it. Friendly reminder that he managed to sway Achilles’ Rage. Friendly reminder that he managed to convince Achilles to let their troops rejoin the war, thus returning the victory to the Greeks.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was flawed. He committed hubris. He got so battle drunk and was so excited by the prospect of finally ending the war, that he disobeyed Achilles’ direct command not to fight near the walls of Troy, and chased the Troyans back to the limits of the city. To the place Achilles had specifically told him not to go because it would be too dangerous. Friendly reminder that this one flaw is his downfall.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus doesn’t go down without giving one hell of a fight. Friendly reminder that Patroclus was so strong that Apollo (the God that protected Troy and Hector [Troy’s heir to the throne]) had to face him and repel him four times. Four times. A god. If that ain’t badass, then I don’t know what could be. In the fourth time, Apollo got inside Patroclus’ head and made him dizzy. Patroclus fell and Apollo removed him from his armour- Achilles’ armour. Patroclus ended up unprotected, vulnerable and dizzy in the middle of the battle field; so a random dude saw the opportunity and stabbed his back with a spear. But was that enough to make him go down? Oh heck no. The pain snapped him out of the dizziness. Patroclus realized he was in a very troublesome situation so he decided to fall back… but at that moment Hector engaged him in battle. And Patroclus wouldn’t retire from a direct combat, oh heck he wouldn’t. Even though he knew this was probably the way he would die, he fought with his all.

Friendly reminder that lacking his armor, tired from battle, with a spear wound on his back and only Achilles’ sword left as weapon, Patroclus faced Hector, Troy’s greatest warrior and didn’t fear.

Friendly reminder that when Hector sheathed his spear in Patroclos’ stomach, Patroclus thought about the love of his life.

Friendly reminder that with his last breath Patroclus smiled at Hector and told him “You are a dead man. This will be your downfall”. Friendly reminder that until his last moment, he was a little shit.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus is a flawed, well-rounded, badass character and that he deserves so much more than his current position as “Achilles’s love interest”.

  • Latin: We don't need a definite article!
  • English: We'll just use the. Simple.
  • French: Le, la, les. For a bit of variety.
  • Ancient Greek: :)
  • Latin: Oh no.
  • Ancient Greek: :) :)
  • English: Don't do it.
  • Ancient Greek: :) :) :)
  • French: Why are you like this?
  • Ancient Greek: ο, του, τω, τον, οι, των, τοις, τους, η, της, τη, την, αι, ταις, τας, το, τα, τω, τοιν
  • Ancient Greek: :)
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The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called the Nike of Samothrace, is a 2nd-century BC marble sculpture of the Greek goddess Nike (Victory). Since 1884, it has been prominently displayed at the Louvre and is one of the most celebrated sculptures in the world. H.W. Janson described it as “the greatest masterpiece of Hellenistic sculpture.

The sculptor is thought to be Pythokritos of Rhodes.

In Praise of Aphrodite

Anthologia Palatina 13.1 = Philip of Thessalonica (1st cent. CE)

Hail, Paphian goddess!  For all mortals,
Whose lives are but a day, pay honor always
To your power, your immortal beauty,
And your majesty which breeds desire,
In all their beauteous words and beauteous works.
For you make known the honor you possess
To everyone, and everywhere on Earth.

 Χαῖρε, θεὰ Παφίη· σὴν γὰρ ἀεὶ δύναμιν
κάλλος τ’ ἀθάνατον καὶ σέβας ἱμερόεν
πάντες τιμῶσιν θνατοὶ ἐφαμέριοι
ἐν πᾶσιν μύθοις ἔργοισίν τε καλοῖς·
πάντῃ γὰρ πᾶσιν σὴν δηλοῖς τιμήν.

Terracotta statuette depicting Aphrodite riding on a goose.  Artist unknown; 3rd cent. BCE.  Now in the Staatliche Antikensammlungen, Munich.  Photo credit: Carole Raddato.

Αν δεν μπορείς να έχεις έναν πιστό φίλο, να είσαι ο ίδιος φίλος του εαυτού σου.
—  Πυθαγόρας

Greek Terracotta Cosmetic Vase from the Archaic Period, 4th quarter of the 6th century B.C.

On one side of the upper frieze of this exquisite vase, a youth holds two winged horses and two youths drive a chariot. Real and imaginary animals circulate on the other frieze areas between carefully drawn geometric patterns. The ram’s-head cover may have served as a handle for a cosmetic applicator.

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i love alexander the great’s relationship with his boyfriend Hephasetion who was a general in his army and his personal bodyguard. they told each other their secrets and were present at each others most significant life events…Their mutual teacher, Aristotle, described them as being one soul in two bodies. when the Persian queen mother apologized for mistaking Hephaestion for Alexander because of his taller height, Alexander dismissed her embarrassment by stating “he too is Alexander.” they were childhood friends, remaining close to one another their whole lives until Haphaestion’s sudden death of what is thought to be either typhoid fever or even poisoning in 324 BC. if hephaestion was poisoned for political reasons, perhaps to emotionally disturb Alexander and sully his judgement in government and military affairs, it worked lol….he went nuts. when hephaestion died, Alexander was ravaged with grief… there are multiple accounts of Alexander laying on top of Hephaestion’s corpse for a full day and night in tears, refusing to leave until his companions dragged him away. he didn’t eat for days. he cut his hair short and later laid the shorn locks on Hephaestion’s funeral pyre…romantic rite..he called for the manes and tails of horses to be shorn, banned the playing of music, executed Hephaestion’s doctor for not saving him, and led a campaign against a nearby tribe in order to perform executions as offerings to Hephaestion’s spirit.. he sought out to have Hephaestion be worshipped as a god and was told by an oracle he would be permitted to be revered as a divine hero. he then erected shrines in his honor. 

still don’t think alexander was head over heels for hephaestion? alexander paid a tiny humble sum for Hephaestin’s funeral, around what would be todays equivalent of 1,632,825,000 DOLLARS !!!! i could buy like 19 venti starbucks mocha choca loca ice sugar frappachinos with that god damn .. the funeral had thousands of performers and attendees present, with contests of the arts and athletics held in Hephaestions honor. Alexander even ordered that the sacred fame to be extinguished, an act reserved for the death of the king (so for him to give an honor meant for his own death to someone else is saying something bc he was so full of himself lol)

Alexander died eight months later. at the time of his death, he was still planning monuments for Hephaestion. some believe that hephaestion’s passing led to his disregard of his health, thus causing his mental and physical state to decline and leading to his own death.

whether U consider their relationship to be platonic or otherwise (its otherwise baby), its clear that they had a deep intimate bond that may have verged on codependency and obsession on alexander’s part, who seemed to see Hephaestion as both a precious and vital companion and an extension of himself, an alter ego or something, one person split in two… the idea that Alexander died bc Hephaestion’s death was beyond losing a dear freind and more akin to being without a vital organ is darkly romantic to me