origami japanese

Kimono. Taisho period (1912-1927), Japan.  The Kimono Gallery. A chirimen silk kimono featuring colorful finely-detailed yuzen-dyed ‘orizuru" (folded paper cranes). Gold foil outlining. The orizuru (ori- “folded,” tsuru “crane”), or paper crane, is a design considered the most classic of all Japanese origami, and was first illustrated in one of the oldest known origami books, the Hiden Renzuru no Orikata (1797). According to Japanese lore, folding 1,000 Origami Cranes is truly a labor of love. Tradition holds that the bride who finishes this task, called 'sembazuru’, before her wedding day will be richly rewarded with a good and happy marriage. Paying homage to the majestic crane, which mates for life and is said to live one thousand years, the bride ensures her own good fortune. The many origami cranes created on this kimono are meant to represent the thousand. Thus this kimono was likely created and worn at a wedding, either by the bride following the main ceremony, or by the bride’s mother.

Yuzen-painted Kimono. Taisho period (1912-1926), Japan.  The Kimono Gallery. A high-grade rinzu silk kimono that features large and bold yuzen-dyed origami paper-crane motifs throughout. Each of the many origami crane motifs is unique. Gold surihaku (metal leafing) outlining. A single mon (family crest) on the back. The orizuru (ori- “folded,” tsuru “crane”), or paper crane, is a design considered the most classic of all Japanese origami, and was first illustrated in one of the oldest known origami books, the Hiden Renzuru no Orikata (1797). According to Japanese lore, folding 1,000 Origami Cranes is truly a labour of love. Tradition holds that the bride who finishes this task, called ‘sembazuru’, before her wedding day will be richly rewarded with a good and happy marriage. Paying homage to the majestic crane, which mates for life and is said to live one thousand years, the bride ensures her own good fortune. The many origami cranes created on this kimono are meant to represent the thousand. Thus this kimono was likely created and worn at a wedding, either by the bride prior or following the main ceremony, or by the bride’s mother.

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Paul Louise-Julie (USA) - Sculpting painting

New York-based artist Paul Louise-Julie has spent the last 7 years researching African civilizations and art, including a year-long journey to West Africa and the Sahara Desert. These sculptures (and 3D paintings) are part of a resulting body of work Louise-Julie created in response to his discoveries and experiences there. The pieces represent a successful collision of artistic methods and themes from multiple cultures, blending ideas from Western contemporary art, traditional African methods, and even Japanese-influenced origami and paper craft. The artworks you see here are among his first sculptures. Louise-Julie is also working on a companion graphic novel that will be released gradually starting later this year. (src. Colossal)

via Colossal © All images courtesy the artist

[more Paul Louise-Julie]

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ミニチュア折り紙  鶴(伝承/折り手: skeico)

紙: 8mm×8mmの『折り紙』。 使ったもの: なし(素手)。


A tiny origami crane

traditional Japanese models/folded by me/a piece of 1cm-square “ORIGAMI PAPER”/no tools

Wow! I keep getting more skilled at folding tiny origamis because a half year ago, I failed to make cranes even of 1cm-square origami paper which is much thicker than parchment paper I usually use for them!


器用さ伸びてます!

実は半年前には折り紙用の紙では1cm角からすら折り上げられませんでした。折り紙用の紙では、普段ミニチュア用に使っているクッキングシートより分厚いので、どうしても難しくなってしまいます。それがいつの間にか8mm角で出来るようになっていて嬉しいです!