The story of Prince Ahmed and the Fairy Perie Banou from the Arabian Nights Entertainments.
Illustrated by Charles Robinson.
Ink and watercolor drawing.
20.8 x 26.3 cm. (7.87 x 10.23 in.)
Original work.
Gay & Hancock.
.c.1915.

The Sorceress Returned The Next Day

after hearing about it through the submission to @angryasiangirlsunited, i checked out the trailer of Lucy and am even more disgusted. and so not surprised. whiteness is getting too old.

the upcoming movie lucy will feature the age-old racist narrative of pure white woman (scarlet johansson) being violated by scary, brown men. and the new white feminist trope of women gaining their power by violently eliminating brown men. who needs the white male savior when we now have white female saviors, taking it into their own hands to save their whiteness from all that non-whiteness. so radical.
youtube

“Shit white guys say to Asian girls”

I really don’t think we’re going to end racism by joking about it. Like i’m glad that the white liberals feel like they are less racist because they can joke about people who are more explicitly racist but that actually does nothing to help people of color
Iwasaki was one of several geisha author Arthur Golden interviewed while researching his novel Memoirs of a Geisha. According to Iwasaki, she agreed to speak with Golden on the condition that her involvement would be kept confidential, but Golden revealed her identity by mentioning her name in the book’s acknowledgments as well as several national interviews. After Memoirs was published, Iwasaki received criticism and even death threats for violating the traditional geisha code of silence. Iwasaki felt betrayed by Golden’s use of information she considered confidential, as well as the way he twisted reality. She denounced Memoirs of a Geisha as being an inaccurate depiction of the life of a geisha. Iwasaki was particularly offended by the novel’s portrayal of geiko engaging in ritualized prostitution. For example, in the novel the main character Sayuri’s virginity (called mizuage in the novel) is auctioned off to the highest bidder. Iwasaki stated that not only did this never happen to her, but that no such custom ever existed in Gion.
Part of Iwasaki’s displeasure with Memoirs may have been because the character Sayuri seems obviously modeled on Iwasaki, with many of the book’s main characters and events having parallels in Iwasaki’s life. These people and experiences are often portrayed negatively in Memoirs, even when their real-life counterparts were positive for Iwasaki. Iwasaki later gave public interviews citing that many established geiko criticized her interview with Arthur Golden, causing a rupture with the geisha tradition of secrecy to the outside world. Furthermore, Iwasaki has mentioned that she had lost some friends and relationships due to the scandal of her being known due to the book, along with certain inconsistencies and fallacies about Gion which were mentioned in Memoirs of a Geisha.
Iwasaki sued Golden for breach of contract and defamation of character in 2001, which was settled out of court in 2003.
—  Why You Should Stop Romanticizing Memoirs of a Geisha. 

So now people think any form of racism against Asians is “Orientalism”. Like, no.

Calling us racial slurs, making fun of our accents, etc. is plain old racism.

Calling us “mysterious lotus flower geishas from the far east” or “exotic golden belly dancers from arabian nights” is Orientialism. 

Learn the difference.

Annie (a pseudonym) is a Chinese-American, straight, female university professor. While she was in graduate school, she found it difficult to receive medical treatment due to the perceived psychiatric condition of simply being Asian and female: “I went to a doctor at the university because I had recurring abdominal pain. The doctor listened to my description, but rather than doing a physical exam, he explained to me that it was normal for Asian women to be anxious and stressed out, and anxiety was probably causing my abdominal pain.” But surprisingly, the doctor didn’t treat the anxiety either. He just said there was nothing he could do.
Hollywood has no idea what to do with Asian people. And, given the fact that Hollywood often serves as a reflection of contemporary culture, this is a major problem. Aside from casting us as goofy comic relief (Long Duk Dong, really) or evil mystical ninjas (come on, Daredevil season 2), they just don’t know what to do with us. The confusion and ignorance around what we bring to the table sometimes gets so bad that rather than try and find out who we actually are, they’ll overwrite us with white characters, erasing us completely from narratives that inherently belong to one culture or another (looking at you, Ghost in the Shell).