organizing-tips

Declutter Your Life

I’ve resolved that every Wednesday, I will write a masterpost about self care and living clean and happy lifestyles. Mainly because my blog is devoted to that too, besides being a studyblr, but I hardly ever post original content about it, so hereeee we go. :)

Plan first

  • Make a list of areas you want to tackle
  • Or items you want to go through
  • Set how long you’ll clean
  • And a little reward for yourself when you’ve reached that goal
  • Envision what you want your space to look like at the end
  • Set aside three baskets or areas: one for things to keep, one for things to trash, and one for things to donate/sell

House

There are just some ideas of things to get rid of or pare down. Feel free to add your own. :)

Bedroom

  • unnecessary pillows on your bed or extra blankets
  • monsters under your bed
  • chargers, wires, etc. that go to devices you don’t have anymore or that are broken
  • old devices, phones, ipods
  • books you felt kinda eh about while reading them
  • copies of books or CDs
  • old notebooks
  • sticky notes that have lost their stickiness
  • broken pencils
  • markers that have dried up
  • any art supply you don’t use
  • scrap paper that’s gotten too small
  • scrap yarn that’s gotten too small
  • old art projects
  • unfinished art projects
  • papers
  • candles w/o any smell
  • Scentsy-type stuff w/o any smell

Closet

  • clothes that don’t fit
  • all of those clothes you save for your “ugly days”
  • shoes that hurt that you don’t even like the looks of
  • underwear with holes (or blood stains - ya feel me, girls?)
  • socks without a matching pair
  • socks with holes
  • bras that are even looking tired
  • copies of clothes, like multiple white t-shirts
  • jewelry you don’t wear
  • childish jewelry
  • broken jewelry

Bathroom

  • hygiene products past their expiration date
  • faded towels
  • bottles with only a few drops of product left
  • worn out toothbrushes
  • hairbands that have lost their elasticity
  • congealed nail polish
  • makeup you regret buying

Digital Life

Social Media

  • Unfollow people, be merciless, make your social media a place of positivity
  • unfriend toxic people (see the next section)
  • go through your own posts and delete anything you regret posting
  • take social media breaks

Computer

  • upload all of your photos to Google photos or flickr or photobucket or onedrive or whatever, or even a CD, then delete them from your memory
  • also back up important documents or just things you want to keep to something else and delete them on your computer
  • go through and sort everything into files
  • delete any programs you don’t use

Phone

  • clean out your pictures, upload them to cloud or whatever
  • delete all of the apps you don’t use or need
  • go through your contacts and delete the people you don’t want to contact anymore
  • delete old text message conversations
  • give yourself a new background too, something clean and simple

Relationships

  • Get rid of those people who are toxic in your life, mute notifications from them, unfollow them on social media (you can unfollow someone one facebook without unfriending them), don’t answer them often
  • make an effort to interact with people face-to-face rather than through text or the internet
  • decide who you want to actively invest your energy in

School

  • make a study schedule
  • prioritize your schedule – study the hardest subjects the most
  • remember that grades are important
  • also remember that grades aren’t everything 
  • (pls don’t fire me from being a studyblr)
  • if you can’t get everything you need to do done in 24 hours without sacrificing 8 hours of sleep and a bit of time for yourself, then you’re doing too much

Best tip to stay decluttered: Learn to say no.

Tips on Grimoire Organization

Please note that if you are using a hard bound notebook or journal, adding in additional pages will bulk up your book, like so: (these are the exact same journals, btw)

- Envelopes. Let’s say you’re doing a section on Tarot in your Grimoire, and you want to include a few Tarot spreads, but you don’t want to waste two or three pages. Glue an envelope onto one of your pages to make a “pocket” where you can store little cards or papers with the tarot spreads written on them.

- Pockets. Similar to the envelope idea. If you have a page, or section for example, on herbal teas, you can make a pocket out of a piece of paper to keep your current favorite tea recipes in.

- Dividers, Cover Pages and Ribbons. If you’re like me and you like to have “sections” in your grimoire, you can easily make dividers by gluing a sheet of paper in your book (to make it heavier to make the sections stand out more). You can go further by turning your divider into a cover page for that section. And if you don’t like the idea doing that, you can always glue a ribbon, or a string, to the spine of your book to act as a bookmark.

- Double pages. I always had a problem with “wasting” pages in my grimoire. For example, my page on consecrating and charging. These two concepts are very similar to me, and I didn’t want two page stating the same thing. So, what I did was write out all my information on charging on a separate sheet of paper, then glued the top of that page into my grimoire. This way I could flip up the page on charging (as if it were on a clipboard) and have my page on consecrating underneath.

- Extended pages. Similar to the one above. In my Crystal section of my Grimoire, I decided to write out a chart that let me search for crystals by intention. So I drew my chart on a long sheet of paper, then folded it over (side to side) so that it fit comfortably in my book, then I just glued one side down into the book.

- Brochures. In my Elements section, I had a ton of information I wanted to write down, but I didn’t want each element to have more than two pages. So I used a piece of computer paper and folded it into a brochure (or into thirds) and glued it into the book so that the flaps would open and give me double the space to write.

- Clear Tape. There are many times where i finished a page in my grimoire only to find out there was a section that I left out. A simply way to fix this was with clear tape. I would write my forgotten bit of into on a separate piece of paper and then use clear tape to tape one side of the paper to my page. This allows me to flip the paper back and forth without covering up anything that I had written.

Other Resources on Grimoire Organization:

- Witch Tip by @pumpkin-bean
- Grimoire Index by @triplevirgo
- Witchy-Woman’s Grimoire Organization by @witchy-woman
- Altar in a Journal by @thesubtlewitch

I hope this helps everyone with their Grimoire organizing needs! If anyone knows of any other awesome organizing tips, feel free to share!

P.S. Check out my Grimoire Masterpost for more tips on making a grimoire!

~L

40 Study Tips & Tricks

I thought to write down the “script” to one of my most viewed videos, with 40 study tips & tricks. It’s easier to read them and pass on the word!

Organization Tips:

1. Incorporate homework and classes in you daily planner – that will give you an overall glimpse of how your week will be about and how much time you need to spend in your studying sessions!

2. Color coordinate classes – be it notes, your planner, your textbooks or binders, pick a unique color for each class and work around the hues of that color to get more organized!

3. Make your own syllabus – if your professor doesn’t provide a syllabus for your class, try to make one before the school year working around your given textbooks or other given material.

4. Make study guides – make a study guide from your syllabus and draw before each topic two boxes: one for a midtest and one for the final test. When you have one of these tests, check the boxes when you’ve finished studying the chapter so you won’t miss anything!

5. Reference your material throughout – most of the times, we students work with in-class notes, textbooks and a syllabus. Since we get small bits of information here and there it’s important to reference every page throughout all your material so you can quickly access your information without having to flip endlessly through pages!

6. Keep a dashboard nearby – Whenever you use a notebook or a binder, make a dashboard on the first page with post it notes so you can quickly scribble any questions, homework or page numbers. When you get home, you just need to open your dashboard and attend those notes.

7. Print any tests, exercises and exams you can find – keep those in the end of your binder. These are perfect to practice before exams and tests because they really reflect what you will be tested about. Set an alarm clock for the deadline and start working on those!

8. Condense – organization disappears when you have too many of everything. Working with more than one planner in your life will make everything chaotic. If you think you need a second planner because you don’t have enough space to write in the first one, it’s because you don’t have available time as well. Don’t fool yourself and set achievable goals!

9. Customize your textbooks – most of the times, textbooks are formal books where information is hard to come by. Make your own tabs and write every chapter on them so they stick out – flag any charts, tables or graphics. Everything needs to be incredibly accessible!

10 Print a special planning sheet before finals: Organizing your studying by chapters and/or topics before finals is tremendously important since it lets you organize the amount of time you dedicate to each subject,

Study Sessions and Time Management

11. Save at least one afternoon or one morning a week for intensive studying. These is your “life-saver” – when you get so full of homework and projects that you can’t incorporate them into your daily academic routine, one free afternoon to organize your school life will really come in handy! Make an appointment with yourself!

12. Prepare in advance – although most professors may not ask you to prepare a class in advance, if you have the means to, go ahead. Grab a sheet and make a summary of the chapter your class will be about. Write the major topics and key information and take that guide to class. When your professor repeats previously studied information, you will be able to understand everything much better!

13. Never leave something behind – Even if you have a more light class, where professors don’t request homework or any side projects, don’t let that fool you! Be disciplined and be your own professors! Make your own projects and learn everything you can so you can nail those finals when they arrive.

14. Write your questions – most of the time, in a heavy study session, we come up with tons of questions and sometimes we just leave them behind. Write them down in your dashboard or a small notebook and ask your professors (personally or via e-mail). You can also ask your schoolmates in a facebook group created for that purpose!

15. Set an alarm clock and reward yourself – even if you study during an entire afternoon your studying will be pointless if you don’t take regular breaks. Set an alarm clock for one hour/one hour and a half and then take a 15 minute break. Never study for more than 2 hours straight! Even if you don’t notice, you’ll get less and less focused.

16. . Make a list – before each study session I like to grab my notepad and write down everything that I need to do before my session ends: the chapters I need to read, the pages I need to go through and the homework I need to complete. Sometimes I even write theses lists when I’m in college so I’ll have more determination to complete those tasks once I get home.

17 Work on the least interesting thing first. There are always classes or projects that we like the least – and those are the ones that we need to tackle first. You will start your studying session concentrated, which will let you go through the worst tasks faster.

18 Print, print, print. try to print everything you can and never study from your computer. Having your PDF files printed at hand will let you concentrate better, highlight and write some notes in the margins. You can take these everywhere with you and even turn them into small guides for future classes!

19. If you finish ahead, don’t quit. Perhaps the time you’ve saved for your study session has come to an end way before you have planned. That doesn’t mean you should stop right now – Take that time to review what you’ve learned so far or prepare other classes ahead of time!

20. Study in an organized space – make your own studying corner – bring everything you will need, from textbooks, binders and notebooks, to a cup of coffee and your computer. Keep them neatily organized on your desk so everything is at hand and on sight. Put on some soft background music (links down below) and adjust the lightning.

In class notes

21. If your professor provides PowerPoint slides before each class, print them (six or four per page) and bring them to class. Write in the margins and more throughout information in the back so it’s all condensed and tight. This is where you’ll take your notes. If you prefer to write on lined paper, think about copying some ruled paper to the back of your printed slides.

22. If your professor asks you to prepare your class in advance, try to make a small guide for each class. Open the comments column in MSWord and print the pages with that column. When you go to class, incorporate the in-class notes in that column, next to the relevant information so everything is nice and condensed.

23 If you are in a information-heavy class, try to adopt the Cornell method, which is the best, in my opinion, when you need to be a fast writer. There’s a video right here on how to use this method.

24. If you are in a bits-and-pieces class, which is that kind of class where the professor just gives a few key points and then gives practical examples or makes you work in group, try to adopt the box method – you can draw these boxes yourself or make them with post it notes – these are way more visual and perfect to memorize information.

25. Write in-class flashcards – if you don’t have flashcards around, make tiny flashcards on the top of your notes, where you cover the definitions you’ve written with the name of the definition. Each time you open your notes, try to remember the hidden definition. Automatic studying, every time!

26. Participate in class – nothing better than to be actively involved in your class discussion. For most of us, shy creatures, participating can be dreadful – but once you get out of your box, you’ll see how participating really makes you understand the subject!

27. If you have any questions during class, raise your hand and ask them. If your professor doesn’t like being interrupted, write them down and approach them in the end of the class. Sometimes, the little things we don’t understand are exactly the ones that come up on the final exam!

28. Ask for examples. Examples are probably the thing that makes your brain connect the information faster. If your professor isn’t keen on providing examples, suggest your own and see if your answer comes up right. Sometimes, examples are the thing that really makes us understand our material and our definitions, since they transform formal information into relatable events.

29. Sit at the front. It sounds too straightforward but sitting at the front really makes wonders. You won’t get distracted by what you classmates are doing, you will focus on the professor, who is right in front of you and you will resist the temptation of going to Facebook and Instagram during a boring presentation.

30. Write a brief summary at the end of the class. During those five minutes where everyone is dismissed and leaving the room, write a brief summary of that classes’ key points in the back of a page – this is fundamental in the Cornell method but can be used in any other method as well.

Finals Guide

31 Skim through your material two times: at first, you should start by studying your material starting from the end. The last lessons will be fresh in your memory and it’s very important to reinforce your knowledge on these while you can. In the second reading, you should start from the beginning, as usual. It’s important to make these two readings so you can go through the information in a much more flexible way.

 32. Make a mindmap of each chapter. A mindmap is a chart that relates key words and important information, making it easy to understand the relationship and hierarchy between such key words. Use colors and images to memorize your material better. Oh, and don’t forget to check out my video on how to make mindmaps!

33. Read each of the titles and try to say out loud its contents, explaining each concept and the relationship between them. Imagine you are the teacher and are lecturing that subject to a crowd. If you skip any of the subjects, do it all over again. The more you repeat, the better you will memorize.

34. It’s time for some flash cards!  Write the topic or the title on one side and the meaning or the explanation on the other. Try to cover as many topics or titles as you can and go through your cards while memorizing as best as you can each of the concepts. Try to do it backwards if you have time to do so!

35. On the day before the exam, skim through your mindmaps and flash cards again and always try to study while talking. Saying your content out loud will force your brain to relate information in a much more cohesive way and you’ll memorize everything much better.

36. Read the entire exam from top to bottom. Underline or circle any important words that you think will be crucial in you answer. After that, calculate how much time you should spend answering each question: this simple calculation will take only twenty seconds and will help you organize your time. Try to save five minutes at the end for revisions.

37. If you are solving a written exam and not multiple choice, try as much as possible to organize each answer in a structured way, saving two lines just to present your line of thought and writing each different argument in a different paragraph. Draft a conclusion at the end to underline the centre of your answer. Sometimes softly underlining some keywords is important to make your professor notice that you’ve correctly given importance to certain concepts.

38. Use these symbols for each question: one dot if you aren’t sure of the answer, two dots if you are sure of your answer and a circle if you are completely unaware of your answer. Start by answering any question with two dots; after those are all answered, go on through the two dots question. Leave the circle questions to the end – and ALWAYS answer them! Even if you don’t know what they’re about, who knows if you will be able to come up with something right?

39. Review your test one final time – many times, we make a lot of mistakes under stress and now is when you should spot them and amend them. This can be the difference between a B and an A!

40. Don’t take this too seriously – school is an important aspect of our lives but it isn’t everything. Failure comes many times and these failures can even drive you away from something that was simply not meant to be. Don’t stress out because everyone goes through the same!

5 Tips for Staying Motivated

1. Reward as you go. You should be proud of everything you accomplish along the way, not just the destination itself. So be happy when you complete one assignment or find sources for an essay, don’t just focus on the overall grade at the end of the year.

2. Set goals. Early in the semester, you need to establish what you want to accomplish this school year. Whether that be study more or go out less, you need to make and write down a plan right off the bat. 

3. Don’t get discouraged. We all mess up. We all get behind in school work or break one of the rules we set for ourselves. That’s just a part of life. DO NOT use this as an excuse to give up though. Just start doing it again the next day. It won’t be the end of the world unless you give up complete. 

4. Do things sooner rather than later. Try to get your work done as soon as possible. When you get home from school, take a short break, and I mean SHORT, and then get your assignments done for the day. That way, you can just relax and chill until you go to bed, rather than pulling an all nighter if something ends up taking longer than expected. 

5. Procrastinate with other work. Let’s say you don’t want to read a chapter of a book for a class. Well, before doing that, go ahead and clean your room and practice your violin. If you’re going to procrastinate, do it with something worthwhile, rather than spending hours on tumblr. At least that’s a few less things you have to do later on. 

Here on the studyblr community everyone seems to have neat and organised notes, not the ones written in that hurried and messy handwriting that pretty much all of us take in a daily basis. I decided to write this short guide with the intention of giving tips on how you can have a neat notebook, so when you finally seat down to study and revise, you will have clean and easy to understand notes looking back at you. They do not have to be pretty or aesthetically pleasing in any way, just neat. That is enough to reduce a lot of stress while reading through your notebook before an exam!

Now, this is what I do and works the best for me. It might not be the right method for everyone because it requires a bit of patience and extra time. Even so, I have been doing this for quite a while now and it is what I like the most. I hope it can help you!

1. Buy an additional notebook

Instead of writing directly into your notebook, owning another one for the sole purpose of note taking is the first step. I have only one notebook for all subject and once it ends, I buy a new one. Simple as that. 

As you can see, my handwriting here is ugly (heh, at least for me), hurried and for some people probably barely legible. It looks that way because I was writing what the teacher was saying and writing on the board at that time, so I had to quickly write down everything otherwise I would miss pieces of information. 

At the beginning of each class I write its name and the date, then proceed to take notes under them so later on I will know when the notes were taken.

2. Rewriting notes

The next step is rewriting the notes you have taken on your actual notebook. That is when I do those fancy titles, use coloured pens and write calmly so my handwriting will be legible. 

However, I do not only rewrite them but I also check the textbooks and other online resources to make larger summaries and explanations, to complete them. So, rewriting your notes is also a method of studying in more detail and revising. It has helped me a lot with subjects such as History and Physics!

Here is the outcome! This is a very small example though, my notes are usually much longer, but you can get the idea. Reading something which is written neatly is much better, I bet you can all agree, so that is why I always go through all of this. 

Again, I hope this can be helpful to some of you! Good luck on your exams! :)

10 Angry College Tips For Incoming Freshmen

(I finished my freshman year this spring with a 4.0 GPA, an off-campus research internship, and three professors contacting me suggesting that I apply for a fulbright scholarship.  These tips aren’t coming out of my ass.) 

1. LISTEN TO ME WHEN I SAY THIS: YOU DO NOT NEED TO “GET INVOLVED” IN STUPID CLUBS IF YOU DON’T ENJOY THEM.  Hear “get involved! :)” for the 1000th time and just barf in your mouth a little and move on.  If you work hard and get good grades, and socialize with people on campus when you have free time (it comes more naturally than you think) YOU WILL.  BE.  FINE.  Actually better than fine.  You’ll have time to get a real job/internship, which by the way, is what the real world wants to see you prioritizing.  Moral of the story: Only join clubs if they help your personality thrive and feel healthy.  Don’t do them because you feel pressured.  

2. DON’T TAKE SHIT FROM A N Y O N E. I know you’re trying to fit in and take the stance of trying to make everyone happy to make sure you’ll have plenty of friends.  But you have to realize that you literally just met these people, and they just met you.  If they create an uncomfortable environment for you that makes college harder to cope with, get them the fuck out of your life. Ain’t nobody got time for people’s high school-ass drama.  

3. SKIP YOUR CLASSES SOMETIMES.  If you really have your shit together, it won’t matter.  Your school will say the amount of skips you can get away with before it harms your grade.  Use. Them.

4. BECOME THE MASTER OF WRITING ESSAYS IN ONE NIGHT.  You will have to.  I’m telling you right the fuck now.  And you can get an A, if you work your lil ass off. I’ve done it many times.  

5. DON’T CARE FOR EVEN 1 SECOND WHAT OTHER PEOPLE THINK OF YOU.  If you wanna wear sweats and no makeup, do it.  If you want to dress up and take time to put on makeup, do it.  If you want to stay away from partying, do it.  If you want to party, have a good ass time.  If anyone has enough time to judge you, they need to be studying harder or getting a hobby.  Make yourself comfortable and happy as fuck and enjoy your time in college worry-free. 

6. BE THE ASSHOLE WITH A TABLET OR LAPTOP IN LECTURE.  You won’t have time to copy it all down.  You’ll be miserable.  Just trust me.  I know studies say its more effective to write stuff down for memory, but, write them out later or something.  Learned that one the hard way.

7. DON’T REWRITE YOUR NOTES IF IT DOESN’T HELP YOU STUDY.  If you know doing that doesn’t help you memorize, don’t do it, period.  Or, if you have a collossal asston of notes (like I did) it isn’t even worth rewriting them all in the first place. I’ve fallen down that hole and lost motivation and time.  Just reread them or make flashcards or whatever.  Study for effectiveness, not aesthetic.

8. BE PREPARED FOR LAB TO GO THE “WHOLE TIME.”  Yah, you’re gonna see 3 hours on that brand-shiny-new schedule of yours and be like there’s no way it’ll go that long, right? LOL about that.  Just mentally brace yourself.  Eat and drink beforehand for the love of god we don’t need hangry people handling chemicals.  

9. COMMUTING DOESN’T MAKE YOU A LONER.  Just.  No. If you live close to campus, are comfortable with commuting, and know you’ll save yourself MAJOR debt by doing it, do it and don’t feel a fucking ounce of guilt about it.  It’ll be some early mornings, but your fresh out of college broke ass will thank you, and you’ll use your time more effectively.  (Plus you get a non grimy shower like??)

10. LOVE YOUR NEW FINE ASS SELF.  College is a fresh start.  Put energy into who you have always wanted to be.  And don’t compromise that out of social anxiety and embarrassment.  You’ll be happy and thank yourself if you step out of your comfort zone to be the person you’ve always had in mind.  

5 Ways to Make Your Life More Organized

1. Organize your email. As students, we are constantly being sent emails from classes, work, professors, announcements, etc. The possibilities are endless. It can be so annoying to have to trudge through millions of emails just to find the one you need, so if you organize your email into folders, it makes it much less of a chore.

2. Keep your classes separate.  Different colored folders and spirals are a must. Also, I like to keep my classes organized into different compartments of a plastic drawer set. You can even just get a simple desktop divider, but make sure you have a set place for all your different classes. Nothing is worse than showing up to class with the wrong day’s schoolwork in your backpack. 

3. Make To-Do Lists. I for one will never accomplish something unless I write it down. For whatever reason, seeing something listed with a blank box next to it just gives me that much more motivation to get it done knowing I can check it off at the end of the task. Tip: Use colored pens and pencils to differentiate tasks (i.e. blue for school, green for work, pink for appointments, etc.) 

4. Clean/do laundry once a week. Every Sunday (or whatever day works for you) clean up your room and do your laundry. Nothing is worse than having to do multiple loads of laundry in one day because you’ve let it pile up for so long. Also, cleaning up in intervals makes your life less stressful and chores way easier! I’d take 20 minutes once a week over 3 hours once a month any day. 

5. Organize your files. Digital clutter is the absolute worst. Just take a minute out of your day to sort through all those pictures on your phone, deleting the ones that are duplicates or blurry or just plain useless. Do this on your desktop as well. Make folders for your documents, organize photos by dates and times, and create a reasonable system that you will be able to keep up with.

anonymous asked:

I'm so new to grimore writing, do you have any tips or maybe even a master list of ideas to put in one?

I have posts for this~!

Long story short: what do you want to put into it? 

It is your book, to do with as you will. Put in whatever you think you will want / need to know, that reflects your style of practicing, etc. 

In a tl;dr version of all those links, and a modified version of [this post], here’s some ideas on things you can put into a grimoire (based mostly around informational purposes). 

This list is not complete / extensive / ; moreso, it has a lot of different suggestions to give you some ideas of things you can put in. 

  • about you as a witch
    • these could be in the format of journal pages
    • what you want out of witchcraft, information about your natal / birth chart if you like astrology, any notes of things you do day to day, etc.
  • terminology of terms within witchcraft and magic
  • spell timing, such as Sabbats and esbats, moon phases, days of the week, time of the day, etc.
  • correspondences for herbs, essential oils, crystals / minerals, colors, the four elements, planetary associations, etc.
    • substitutions for particular items like herbs, crystals, etc.
    • any safety precautions for working with certain herbs, crystals, etc.
    • information on how to determine personal correspondences and associations
    • magical / non-magical materials that can be used in spells
  • information on the “basics” of witchcraft
    • what intent means, and how to work with it
    • what it means to visualize, and alternatives if you can’t
    • what meditation can do for magic, and how to do it
    • what channeling energy means, and how to do it
    • what it means to charge / enchant objects, and methods to do it
    • setting up an altar / magical work space, and how to do it
  • information on any religions you work within
    • example: for Wicca, you may wish to write out the Wiccan Rede, how to cast a circle, how to call the four corners / elements / guardians of the watchtowers, how to set up an altar, etc.
  • information on any deities you work with / wish to work with
    • offering ideas for any deities you work with
    • invocations for any deities you work with
    • rituals / dedications / prayers to any deities you work with
  • information on any spirits you work with / wish to work with
    • offering ideas for any spirits you work with (i.e. the fae, elemental spirits like sylphs and salamanders, etc.)
  • information on the history of witchcraft
  • information on familiars and working with animals in magic
  • information on varieties of magic
    • examples: energy work, candle magic, crystal magic / crystal grids, sachet magic, knot magic, kitchen magic / tea magic, bath magic, traditional magic, urban / modern magic, chaos magic, pop culture magic, green magic, hedgework, spirit work, shadow work, blood magic, sex magic, necromancy / death magic, etc.
    • MAGIC NO LONGER LOOKS LIKE A WORD TO ME
  • any safety precautions for working with certain varieties of magic
  • any divination methods you wish to try
    • examples: definitions of the tarot cards, tarot spreads, cartomancy interpretations, definitions of runes, reading tea leaves (tasseomancy) / coffee grounds, tips on pendulum reading, etc.
  • spells that you write yourself, or sigils you create yourself
    • any notes and observations you made when testing that spell / using it
  • spells or sigils from external sources that you may want to use and/or reference
  • specific categories of spells
    • examples: protection, cleansing / purification, banishing, binding, healing, new beginnings / moving on, happiness, self love, relationships, friendships, glamours, confidence, strength, energy, luck, money / wealth, school, employment, sleep, dreams / nightmares, divination, magic amplification, etc.
  • recipes for potions, powders, oils, tinctures, etc.
  • chants and incantations
  • blessings
  • curses
  • information on any magical groups or covens you participate in
    • coven rules and guidelines, members lists and contact information, etc.

I hope that helps you! Good luck!

Ahhh this is the last advice post for the back to school marathon! Whew, it’s a really huge accomplishment for me, and I hope that you appreciated all my tips and advice. This post will feature some of my favorite organization tips for school, where some of these are familiar. If you’re a student, then these tips should be surely something to take home~

use a planner, bujo, or anything to keep all your plans: You’ve seen this tip everywhere, therefore it is very important. Use a planner, bullet journal, or really just anything like a notebook or notepad (something that is compilable) to record all your assignments,, important dates, etc. This is beneficial for organizing your schoolwork and being on track of things.

specific binders and folders: I really love these things because they keep all your papers in one place. I placed “specific” because it’s very orderly to designate one folder or binder for one subject, but then again it’s possible to have a combined-subject binder or folder (like expandable file folders). I personally use plastic folders with 3 rings because they’re not bulky, yet they hold your papers well!

use dividers, sticky notes, page flags, etc.: These (and the similar) stationery are created for organization, so you should consider using them! Dividers are good for combined-subject binders/folders. Sticky notes and page flags can also serve as dividing tabs as well~

get a school bag with a good amount of pockets: I see that a lot of people want to just shove in all their writing utensils, sticky notes, etc. in their bag, and it gets LOST into the abyss, like no joke LOL. Having a bag with multiple pockets can solve the problem. Put specific items into specific pockets to arrange them to your liking. Larger pockets are also good for storing big things like folders or laptops, and some could be for food too!

have pouches: This is another option if you do not have a bag with many pockets. Have a good pencil case that suffices to your needs, depending on the amount of writing utensils you bring to school (which I’m guessing if you’re a stationery addict, then a LOT haha). You can have a pouches for your personal essentials, or maybe small stationery. The options are limitless! ;D 

only bring the stuff you need: I have a rotating schedule; 5 periods a day out of 7 periods, so I don’t have to bring all my folders and notebooks. If your schedule is not like mines, then I would suggest taking out some papers that you know you won’t need in class. That way, you can lessen the load on your back or shoulder, and that’s a great feeling :D

one item, one area: A basic foundation of organization is this principle, and I thought I might as well include it here. That is: for ONE kind of item, place them in ONE area. Sometimes people shove papers of one class into a folder of another, and it may take them a long while and a small panic attack if they couldn’t find it. Hence, remember to always store certain items into their own little homes~ :3

Hopefully some of these tips may be helpful, or could serve as refreshers/reminders for those who needed it. Thank you very much for reading, and have an amazing day/night!~

((Also, I just wanted to say that my FINAL back to school marathon day (8.31) will feature a “Q&A for students 12th grade and below”. If you are bubbling up any school-related questions, then be sure to anticipate for that! More details will be said in a future post~))

The College Backpack

Hello! If you’re just starting out at college or you’re returning to college, I hope you can find this list helpful. This is sort of a checklist – and by no means should you include into your backpack everything on it. But, using your own judgement, you should be able to choose which of these items would be most useful to you in your backpack. :)

I hope everyone has wonderful back to school experiences!

School supplies

  • textbooks
  • folders/binders/notebooks
  • pencil case with appropriate contents
  • planner
  • mini stapler
  • sticky notes

Tech

  • phone
  • laptop (w.case)
  • tablet (w.cover)
  • charger
  • USB
  • headphones/earphones
  • calculator
  • speaker (for those impromptu student lounge parties)

Hygiene

  • tampons/pads
  • makeup
  • deodorant
  • hand sanitizer/hand wipes
  • tissues
  • spare pants (leggings) in case of period mishaps
  • jacket
  • nail file
  • mints
  • lip balm
  • lotion
  • Tide-to-Go pen
  • glasses/contact case
  • ponytail holders
  • sunglasses

Other

  • snacks
  • water bottle
  • keys
  • student ID
  • wallet
  • books (for fun)
  • umbrella
  • gum
  • lunch

Previous #Studying Saturdays post: Planner Organization for School

tips & tricks & i’ve learned in 21 years as a human girl who has adhd

some of these i’ve learned on my own, or from family/friends, or reddit/tumblr/pintrest/facebook. but i’ve compiled a list that has helped me remain focused, organized, and not having my mind go all over the place. some of them are just good to know.

1. don’t put it down, put it away (helps immensely with clutter)

2. use a planner for everything, not just school (i use an actual planner because writing it down actually helps me remember it better, but an app can work too)

3. color code class materials, use a different color for each subject (i’m a nursing student and i’m always running around like crazy, my binders, folders, and notebooks for each class each have their own color. ex: bio=green, chem=blue, psych=pink. that way if i’m in a rush, i never grab the wrong stuff.)

4. rewriting class notes, memos, important dates, & anything else worth remembering helps to engrain it in your mind 

5. meal prepping twice every week helps to save time & money & also helps to keep your meals nice and healthy (it also helps me remember to eat because sometimes i have a hard time doing so since my vyvanse suppresses my appetite. it also helps to eat before i take my meds because then i have a more normal appetite and i’m not cranky. i’m also someone who would rather just not eat because i get stressed if i have to cook something, so having something all set and ready to go for each meal is such a huge stress relief)

6. do some sort of exercise for 30 minutes at least 4 times a week because it gets rid of excess energy, helps you to focus, & look & feel great (i do 45 minutes of cardio every other day on the stair-stepper & i’ve just gotten really into weight lifting. cardio definitely helps me A LOT to not be so cranky or all over the place)

7. pick out and get your outfit for the next day, every single night (i pick out EVERYTHING from the actual clothes, to the underwear, socks, bra, shoes, & accessories. this helps because i also have a weird thing about how clothes fit over undergarments & i also have a weird thing about matching clothes with undergarments, socks, & shoes)

8. pack your backpack and whatever else you need the night before (i put all my class materials, snacks & drinks, chargers, gym clothes, etc in my bag every night before i go to bed so i don’t rush or forget anything in the morning)

9. have a bag full of essentials that you take everywhere (i have a purse that i keep my wallet, keys, a protein bar, a water, my iPad, a back up charger, pen, small notebook, planner, gum, & hand sanitizer that i take with me everywhere. everything has it’s own special pocket & i never lose track of the things i need)

10. make lists of “to’s” (to do, to remember, to buy)

11. go from room to room whenever you leave someplace to make sure you haven’t left anything behind 

12. use post-it notes in visible places as reminders

13. set aside one day per week to do stuff you need to get done (cleaning, schoolwork, chores, grocery shopping, etc)

14. have a “time out” for yourself every other day to relax and recharge (i set aside an hour or two every single day to read or watch a tv show or do something that doesn’t require too much thought or energy. i don’t answer calls or texts, and i try not to browse social media. this helps me relax and not feel overwhelmed throughout the day or the week)

15. set alarms for waking up, tasks, & cooking fro better time management (i use a great app called 30/30 thats a great task manager. it lets you set up a list with a set time for each task. the timer starts and you go about your task, once the time is up, it lets you know you should move onto your next task)

5 Bullet Journal Page Ideas

1. Goals. Every month, make a page with the goals you want to accomplish that month. Whether it be read more or eat junk food less, it’s a great way to make a tangible list of things you want to accomplish. I find writing things down is a great way for me to actually get things done, rather than just thinking “Oh, yeah, I need to do that at some point.”

2. Budgets. You can do many different things with this idea. You could have a page that is just an overview of your spending for the month. You can do this to try and cut down costs, by giving yourself specific goals on how much money to spend, etc. Or you can even use this to keep track of all your University costs in one place. The possibilities are endless, which makes it a great idea for multiple pages in your bullet journal.

3. Gift Ideas. Keep a running list of things to get yourself, mom, dad, brother, sister, boyfriend, girlfriend, etc. Nothing’s worse than when it’s time to go Christmas shopping, and you have no ideas. With this, you can write things down throughout the year and have a long list before the holiday and/or birthday seasons!

4. Accomplishments. This is a list of things you’ve accomplished throughout the year, so when you move onto your new bullet journal, you can look back on all the great things you did. This is something that will be awesome to look back on in a few years, remembering what you did each year that you considered to be an achievement worthy of making the list!

5. Textbooks/Materials/Books. This is especially helpful for college students who are renting and buying textbooks from a lot of different places. I like to write down where I got the textbook and it’s due date, so I’ll never forget to return a book! You can also use this page to write down things you need to buy for the coming school year that are designated in your syllabus.

PLANNING YOUR WEEK

Start early!

  • Planning your week should start Saturday night. The week officially begins on Sunday, and Saturday night is the day to figure out everything that will be happening. By doing this, you do not have to spend meaningless time on the Sunday which commences your week with tasks such as planning. Everything should already be planned.

Find out what is on your plate for the upcoming week

  • Look at your school’s portal, or the syllabus, whatever your instructors use to inform you of tests, quizzes, essays and other assessments. Write down what is coming up this week!!! Know everything there is to know about what will be on your plate.

Use color

  • Color is an extremely effective categorization tool. It can allow you to distinguish between tests, quizzes, essays, homework assignments, extracurricular activities, health, personal activities, and more. Assign a color to each subsection of your plan, and create a key so you’re aware of what’s happening. Stay true to this color key, and don’t stray from it.

Prioritize

  • Your plan should feature the most important things to complete and the least important. However, your plan should also establish a general understanding of the ranking system these assignments fall under. If you have a very important test coming up which will count for a large portion of your grade, it should be featured earlier in and stressed more clearly in your plan. Utilize highlighters to clarify the importance level of different assignments.

Make time parameters

  • Making a plan is very important, but assigning time blocks to the plan is arguably even more important. Consider what you do every day after school. Think about how much you do after every day, and at what times you will be doing homework. Consider the length of time it takes to complete each assignment. Then, assign time blocks to each assignment. For example, you could assign “English Essay” for 4 pm - 6 pm, then “Break” from 6 pm - 6:30 pm, then “Math Worksheet” from 6:30 pm - 8 pm. This will keep you on track and going to sleep at a reasonable time.

Leave time for fun

  • It cannot be all school all the time - it is not healthy or conducive to effective living. Leave time for fun and breaks. This can manifest in reading a nice book in between assignments, or planning a hangout session with friends during the week. You only get one childhood, and you can NOT spend the entirety of it in academic mania.

Feature your extracurriculars and appointments

  • When you plan out everything, you have to include e v e r y t h i n g. This means that you must feature any meetings you have for extracurricular commitments, doctors appointments, personal appointments and more. This will ensure your plan is truly accurate.

Make copies!!!

  • Put your plan EVERYWHERE. There should be a copy in your planner, a copy in your bullet journal (if you have one), a copy on your desk, a copy on your mirror, and more. Put the plan anywhere you look often, and anywhere it won’t be drowned by other things.

U S E I T

  • Do not ignore the plan, now that you’ve spent all this time making it. Put it to good use! Keep it with you. Love it, learn it, and make it again next Saturday.
6 things i stopped buying: minimalism journey (+ reduce waste)

1. Makeup Remover Wipes: instead, use a washcloth (preferably black) and apply coconut oil or almond oil to the cloth (or face), then use the cloth to wipe your entire makeup off until satisfied. *(continue with face wash routine or face mask)

benefits: reusable // machine washable // save money // gentle on the skin // effectively removes makeup

2. Plastic Toothbrushes:  instead, buy a pack of bamboo toothbrushes on amazon or a general store. use these brushes as you would any other brush and thoroughly brush to improve oral health.

benefits: organic // reusable // decomposable // cleanses teeth effectively // eco-friendly // BPA free bristles

3. Multi-Step Facial Cleansers & Name Brand Body Washes: instead, use African Black soap for both your body and face with your preferred method of washing (electronic brush, hands, or wash cloth). for more simple face washes, consider using vegan and/or organic facial washes that work for your skin type.

benefits: multipurpose // improves overall skin health // all skin types (especially acne prone or oily) // single-step process // organic // save money

4. Plastic Water Bottles: instead, use a simple stainless steel bottle that you can refill throughout the day and keep up with.

benefits: reusable // washable // aesthetic // easy to monitor and handle // eco-friendly

5. Face Moisturizers: instead, use carrier oils (such as coconut oil, argan oil, almond oil, castor oil) that work with your skin type/skin needs *(you can try combining them with essential oils such as tea tree oil, lavender oil, etc.)

benefits: organic // improves skin health // no harsh chemicals // save money // longer lasting // multipurpose

6. Animal Cruelty Makeup: instead, buy makeup products that you truly need (wear daily) from companies that are Animal-Cruelty FREE and/or vegan. do your research and spend your money wisely. some may seem expensive, but consider how much some high-end brands benefit from not being animal-cruelty free *(invest in vegan and/or organic products too).

benefits: eco-friendly // animal-cruelty free // healthier for skin // long-term benefits // *vegan and/or organic

Study organization- notebooks

I love stationery of all kinds, especially notebooks. And when you’re planning on studying, of course you need notebooks for taking notes and practicing! In this post, I’ll talk a little about my notebooks.


What kind(s) of notebook(s) do you use?

My personal preference is for spiral notebooks. I used to use notebooks that just opened like normal books, but they never liked to stay flat and they took up too much space on my desk. It’s funny because I used to hate spirals back when I was younger and way into drawing because the pages were more free to move against each other which led to more smudging, but I love spirals so much for note taking. They lay flat with no problem, which is the biggest thing for me. The spiral does get in the way of my hand sometimes, but it’s a minor annoyance.

I also consider the quality of the paper when buying my notebooks. It doesn’t have to be super high quality, but I just can’t deal with paper the quality of standard US looseleaf. It’s too thin and, more importantly, the surface is too rough. Paper with too rough a surface has led to the early death of too many of my pens—if you use fine-tip pens, size 0.5 or lower, and find they stop writing before the ink runs out—little bits from poor-quality paper probably got into the tip and ruined it. The paper I like the most feels a little bit weighty and nice and smooth!

Hardcover or softcover is also a choice to make! I use both, types:

Left to right- hardcover lined notebook, softcover lined notebook, softcover 원고지 squared paper notebook


How many notebooks do you use?

I have three main types of notebooks! I’ll go over each type:

Grammar notebooks

My grammar notebooks are all hardcover. I use them to collect grammar explanations and other important notes. I write them as cleanly as possible and even use my many colorful highlighters to make them look a little nicer. If I need to know about a grammar point that I have already learned, I open my grammar notebook for the right language and find it. This way, I don’t have to remember which textbook or source I saw a certain grammar point or explanation in—if it’s important, I write it down in my grammar notebook! So, my grammar notebooks are mashups of multiple texts and sources. These are for reference only; I don’t do any practice or extra writing in them. Nothing but the facts!


Practice notebooks

My practice notebook is where I write down definitions of new words I learned, practice sentences for my vocab flashcard words, breakdowns of articles I’ve studied on my Chinese reader apps… I guess calling it a “practice notebook” makes its purpose pretty self-explanatory. It’s nothing special; I write quickly and messily in it, and when it gets full, I can just throw it in the recycling bin and start a fresh one. My practice notebook is a softcover spiral.


Chinese article notebook

Korean squared paper—or I guess any squared paper—is wonderful for writing Chinese characters. Once I’ve encountered an article in a Chinese reader app and broken it down in my practice notebook, I rewrite it cleanly in my article notebook so I can easily find and read it again later.


I don’t always have all of my notebook types with me. If I plan on studying grammar, I will bring the correct grammar notebook along, and if I plan on studying Chinese articles, I might have my article notebook with me, but not always. However, my practice notebook is always in my bag!

How do you organize your notes and all? For those of you who might be struggling to get your notes together, I hope this helped!

Happy studying~

5 Backpack Essentials

1. Hand sanitizer. Sometimes you can’t go to the bathroom and wash your hands, so it’s nice to always have some on hand. It’s never a bad thing to be able to help someone out if they need some either.

2. Headphones. One of the worst things in life- walking across campus without music. I just find it so much more enjoyable if I can listen to something as I go. If you’re into podcasts, those small ten minute commutes from class to class or back to your car is the perfect time to listen to them! They’re entertaining, and you don’t have to listen to the whole thing in one go.

3. Umbrella. This is one of the most important things to always have on you. You never want to be caught in a rainstorm and have to sit in class for hours upon hours in soggy, wet clothes. This has happened to me before, and it sucks. Always have one of these on hand.

4. Gum. You never know when you’ll grab a quick snack on campus or eat lunch with friends. It’s always handy to have some gum so that you can keep your breath nice and fresh.

5. Mini Stapler and Staples. I can’t even count how many times the stapler in my class has broken or jammed or just been out of staples. Everyone goes into a panic, holding multiple pages that cannot be stuck together, wondering why the universe hates them so much. It’s always handy to have a stapler that you can use, and share, if you want to.