organize against

person: liberals are fucking stupid

me: [sweats nervously]

person: their passive and individualistic mindsets keep us from violently organizing against the ruling class

me: oh thank god

My university did nothing to stand between my undocumented community and the hateful hands of radicalized white men, the AntiFas did. A peaceful protest was not going to cancel that event, just like numerous letters from faculty, staff, Freedom of Speech Movement veterans, and even donors did not cancel the event. Only the destruction of glass, and shooting of fireworks did that. The so called “violence” against private property that the media seems so concerned with stopped white supremacy from organizing itself against my community.
Everything else seemed an act of passive acceptance to the hate speech that was about to take place on our campus.
5

The rally in front of Stonewall Inn on Saturday was the perfect response to everything Donald Trump stands for

On Wednesday, The Nation leaked a draft order titled “Establishing a Government-Wide Initiative to Respect Religious Freedom” that could allow any organization to discriminate against the queer people on religious grounds. But one thing that was really great about the rally is that it welcomed ALL forms of intersectional identity, advocating especially for the rights of queer Muslims and queer immigrants.

medium.com
Don’t Get Your Undocumented Friends in Trouble: A How-To
Posted March 2, 2017, written in collaboration with local leaders from the Washington Dream Coalition, an organization led by undocumented youth.
By The Daily Demand

Many US Citizens take our citizenship for granted. It’s something most of us never worry about or think about, and the majority of us have never experienced life without it. As a consequence, we are incredibly out of touch with what privileges come with citizenship and what our impact as citizens can have on our undocumented friends and neighbors.

If we are serious about defending DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) , organizing against ICE raids and detention centers, and exploring other ways to exercise allyship with undocumented folks, there are precautions we must take.

Organizing against deportations and the forces that carry them out is not like campaigning for a candidate, an initiative, or other causes we may all have experiences with- the risk is much higher. While organizing efforts may very well include politicians and initiatives, the nature of the work means that if we are not careful, we can literally get our colleagues, friends, and their families locked up or deported.

*You should not consider the following list legal advice nor an exhaustive list of precautions to take. If there are undocumented people in your lives or on your campaigns, someone should be reaching out to get familiar with their personal boundaries, risk levels, and safety plans.

[Bullet points from the list]:

1. Don’t “out” people who are undocumented. 

2. Don’t “out” areas where undocumented people live. 

3. Don’t prioritize appearing as though you are “centering those most affected” above not getting those “most affected” deported. 

4. Don’t list build if you don’t have to. 

5. Protect your lists as if your own deportation depended on it. 

6. Don’t put YOUR OWN name on lists. 

7. Some things you can do on your own, in secret- and you should. 

8. Understand that Homeland Security, ICE, and other federal agencies are not like your local police department. 

9. Stop fucking inviting your undocumented friends to the detention center. 

10. Do not communicate about sensitive issues around documentation, immigration, etc on phones or digital devices, let alone the internet. 

11. This includes your encrypted apps like Signal.

12. This includes your email servers like RiseUp.Net.

13. This includes Slack.

14. I DON’T CARE WHAT YOUR CODER OR ANARCHIST FRIENDS SAID. DON’T TALK ABOUT SENSITIVE SHIT ON THE INTERNET.

15. Do not spread information that you are not COMPLETELY SURE is accurate and verified.

16. Do not post media of undocumented people on social media. Only videotape what is necessary and destroy what isn’t needed. 

17. Take the time to understand all the risk undocumented people face and how they are treated differently in the legal system. 

18. Don’t ask undocumented people to take coordinated arrests.

Actual things that happened in the Kingdom Hearts manga:

• The dusks like to fuck with Roxas as he sleeps. They draw shit on his face and tie up his hair.

• Kairi escapes from jail in the world that never was because Demyx was too lazy to watch over her

• Kairi escapes by communicating with Dusks through wiggling

• Kairi is caught by Demyx, to which she punches him in the face repeatedly. She then proceeds to allow herself to get caught again so Saïx wont kill Demyx.

• Xion and Axel find a stray Pluto and beg to keep him. Saïx allows this.

• Luxord becomes tiny in wonderland and questions reality. He then becomes giant and proceeds to flirt with the queen of hearts.

• Luxord can no longer enter the Castle that Never Was because he’s too huge

• Vexen makes a shit ton of clones of himself, most of which kind of just hang out in Castle Oblivion and harass the Riku clone.

• One of the clones goes back to TWTNW to get revenge against the organization, and ends up killing Xaldin.

• Yen Sid makes a sock for Sora’s Keyblade. It looks like Mickey Mouse.

• Xaldin has an existential crisis about dried fruit.

• Demyx and Xion play Twister

• No one pays attention to Xemnas during his monologueing.

• Xaldin eats a fruit that makes him laugh uncontrollably.

• Xigbar getting a cold is conflict

• Saïx is basically the entire Organization’s babysitter

• Marluxia and Larxene get KFC for lunch

• Sora smushes cotton candy in Seifer’s face

• Vexen, Zexion, and Lexaeus have a chore chart

• Luxord is legitimately upset that he didn’t get a dramatic entrance to reveal himself to Sora

• Marluxia has a cloud of flowers that perpetually floats behind him. The dusks hate him because they have to clean up the petals.

Just to name a few

how to combat pinkwashing at pride (aka: why slapping a rainbow on everything isn’t good enough)

banks:

- create initiatives that help low-income lgbt people access banking services.

- stop allowing donations to anti-lgbt hate groups, the kkk, and other hate groups that target lgbt people.

- donate money homeless shelters and local organizations that work to eliminate lgbt poverty.

- ensure lgbt employees have access to health insurance and liveable wages.


alcohol companies:

- stop the showing of advertisements that portray binge drinking as healthy

- donate to local lgbt friendly addiction services

- start a program that teaches lgbt inclusive health services for local community organizations that deal with addiction treatment

- work in collaboration with nightclubs and bars to promote “panic buttons” in washrooms, as well as other methods of keeping lgbt patrons safe

- remove sponsorship from events and companies that are known for not being lgbt inclusive


politicians:

- be a part of a political party that actively advocates for the rights and freedoms of lgbt people.

- work in collaboration with local governments to advocate for lgbt rights

- listen to the lived experiences of lgbt people and do not speak over them, or consider your input more valid than theirs

- vote for bills that help lgbt people, vote against those which hinder our freedoms and safety

- do not accept donations from people or organizations that campaign against lgbt rights.


everyone:

- do not hand out promotional material at pride parades unless the information directly benefits the lgbt community specifically.

- do not use the platform of pride to advertise at all, unless doing so would specifically benefit lgbt people.

- do not treat pride like a party; it is, and has always been, a protest and a show of resiliency.

- do NOT create initiatives and events that cater only to white, able-bodied, cisgender gay men. inclusivity means ALL lgbt people are welcomed and heard.

- use your position as a straight ally to ELEVATE the voices of the lgbt community, but do not speak over them. do not tell them what they want or need. trust me, they know better than you do.


when someone says “well would you just prefer we go back to when everyone was homophobic?” you can say “no, i’d prefer that corporations and politicians do MORE than painting a rainbow sign and dancing with feather boas, and here is how they can start.”

APUSH The Musical Part One: songs from musical theater that explain concepts from apush chapters 2-26 of american pagent 

8tracks / playmoss / youtube 

1. Molasses to Rum from 1776: explains the triangle trade as well as the hypocrisy of the revolutionary era on the topic of slavery 

2. Sit Down John from 1776: the apprehension of moderates to declare independence during the continental congress

3. But Mr. Adams from 1776: the declaration of independence (this is partly on here bc it’s about jefferson wanting to bust his nut) 

4. Non-Stop from Hamilton: the formation of the federal government, the constitutional convention, and the federalist papers

5. Cabinet Battle #1 from Hamilton: arguments between federalists and democratic republicans over assumption, excise taxes on whiskey, and slavery 

6. The Room Where It Happens from Hamilton: the dinner that jefferson hosted which decided assumption as well as where the capital would be located 

7. The Election of 1800 from Hamilton: the election of 1800 would lead to the creation of political parties 

8. Alll American Prophet from Book of Mormon: the formation of mormonism and its westward expansion 

9. Rock Star from Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson: the anti-elitist sentiments that would lead to an increase in populism as well as how jackson’s anti-elitist populism contradicted with his own superiority complex 

10. Corrupt Bargain from Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson: the bargain which got JQA elected during the tie breaker for the election of 1824

11. Populism Yea Yea from Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson: the rise of populism and jacksonian democracy 

12. Ten Little Indians from Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson: the awful awful treatment of native americans (especially during jackson’s administration) 

13. Someone In a Tree from Pacific Overtures: the treaty of kanagawa and the “opening” of japan 

14. The Wild Wild West from Harvey Girls: westward expansion and the wild west

15. Paint Your Wagon from Paint Your Wagon: the california gold rush and westward expansion 

16. A Peculiar Institution from Civil War: the awful awful treatment of slaves 

17. The Glory from Civil War: the civil war in general 

18. The Ballad Of Booth from Assassins: john wilkes booth’s assassination of abraham lincoln 

19. The Ballad of Guiteau from Assassins: charles guiteau’s assassination of president garfield because he wanted to place chester a arthur in power so his faction would reap benefits of patronage 

20. The Bottom Line from Newsies: business owner’s cost cutting methods which often disenfranchised the workers 

21. The World Will Know from Newsies: the organization of labor unions against big business during the gilded age 

22. The Ballad of Czolgosz from Assassins: leon czolgosz’s assassination of president william mckinley because he felt the working class was oppressed

medium.com
In Defense of the Violence at Berkeley
A national debate on Freedom of Speech has sparked since the night of February 1st, when a Breitbart hatemonger’s speech was cancelled due…
By Juan A. Prieto

My university did nothing to stand between my undocumented community and the hateful hands of radicalized white men, the AntiFas did. A peaceful protest was not going to cancel that event, just like numerous letters from faculty, staff, Freedom of Speech Movement veterans, and even donors did not cancel the event. Only the destruction of glass, and shooting of fireworks did that. The so called “violence” against private property that the media seems so concerned with stopped white supremacy from organizing itself against my community.

there it is, in a nutshell

  • Me: Listen, I can't make you NOT watch 13 Reasons Why, but I can tell you that it has 2 rape scenes and a graphic depiction of suicide, and almost all studies conducted on the subject have found that media reports containing graphic images and explanations of the specific suicide methodology have led to increased likelihood of imitative suicidal behaviors, especially in vulnerable populations such as young people and people with depression, and that most suicide prevention organizations actually advise against a lot of the storytelling techniques employed in this show, and if the the showrunners had been fully committed to suicide prevention they would have sacrificed some of the disturbing imagery and incorporated some of the experts' recommenda--
  • You, an intellectual: No YOU listen, sweetie. I HAD depression and I wasn't triggered at all, so why would anyone else be triggered by it? Also I think it's kind of fucked up that you're telling people not to watch such an important show because it has such a strong message, and you criticizing that message kind of makes you no better than the characters in the show. So maybe you should think about THAT.

emilylorange  asked:

Hey I know this is weird to send but I'm starting to worry this isn't getting enough attention. Net neutrality is on the chopping block again - it appears the meeting where the vote happens is May 18th. Repub majority committee is voting - It looks very likely they will start dismantling the classification we won and the FCC's ability to regulate in the future. Apparently I can't link articles in asks, buuuuuut the news broke yesterday so it should be easy to verify.

I’ve been flogging this on Twitter as much as I can. I’m glad you brought it up.

https://www.indivisibleguide.com/ is the very best resource you can use to organize and fight back against all of the radicalism and lawlessness of this administration.

For this issue, specifically, I recommend this Take Action page from EFF, and also make a call using this guide from r/technology:

Calls and messages are more effective than e-mail.

Please take 2 minutes to call the FCC at 1-888-225-5322. Once connected, the following will get you to an agent; press 1 then 4, then 2, and finally 0 to get to an agent.

Hour to speak to an agent are 8-5pm EASTERN. Leaving a message appears to not be an option, the line disconnects. It took me 2 minutes and 3 seconds to call and have my opinions logged.


huffingtonpost.com
Missouri Women Could Soon Be Disqualified From Jobs Based On Reproductive Decisions
Legislators aim to undo an ordinance that prevents discrimination in jobs and housing.

Lawmakers in the Missouri Senate spent more than 10 hours in a closed-door special session last week to push through Senate Bill 5, a wide-reaching anti-abortion measure that—among other things—would roll back anti-discrimination protections for women in one of that state’s major cities.

The legislation would undo a relatively recent St. Louis ordinance that prohibits potential employers and landlords from discriminating against women based on their reproductive health history. In other words, if they’ve had an abortion. Or have used birth control. Or if they are pregnant.

When the ordinance first passed last February, supporters hailed it as necessary protection for women living in a deep-red state that is considered to be “hostile” to abortion rights. Unsurprisingly, it also drew sharp criticism from several local religious groups and leaders who lamented its passage as a “terrible moment” for the city of St. Louis. In May, the St. Louis Archdiocese and several other organizations filed suit against the city of St. Louis, seeking to overturn the ordinance

Now, just months later, anti-abortion legislators in the state appear poised to topple the ordinance. The bill—which also includes other anti-abortion measures that would affect women statewide—passed the Senate late last Wednesday and is now being heard in the House Children and Families Committee. The Kansas City Star reports that it could be passed without changes and sent to the governor directly, or undergo revisions that would require the House and Senate to negotiate the differences in a special conference.

NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri—the reproductive rights advocacy group, which fought for the anti-discrimination ordinance to be passed last winter—quickly announced it was launching an online and radio ad campaign criticizing Republican Gov. Eric Greitens who called the special session. (”Do you think your boss should be able to fire you for using birth control? Governor Greitens thinks so,” one ad claims.)

A spokesperson for the group told HuffPost that before the ordinance passed last winter, NARAL had not heard of any specific cases in which women were discriminated against because of their reproductive history. But the group had not been tracking the data closely before then either.

“Under the current political administration, we are seeing more threats against women for using birth control or having an abortion. We wanted to be proactive and protect them,” Kirstin Palovick, an organizing and policy associate with
NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri, told HuffPost in an e-mail. “Since the passage of this bill, we have had at least one person make a discrimination complaint based on their reproductive health care. We know the problem is happening, and we are beginning to hear more stories about it.”

8

Female Rulers in Russian History

Olga of Kiev (c. 890-969) of the House of Rurik (reign as Regent: 945-964).
Wife of Prince Igor, the son of Rurik, Prince of Novgorod, a founder and first ruler of the Rurik dynasty - the first ruling Russian dynasty. The marriage is fought to be initiated by  Oleg the Prophet,  Prince of Novgorod, Rurik’s relative and founder of Kievan Rus’. After Oleg’s death Igor assumed the rule over Kievan Rus’. Igor and Olga had one known surviving son, Svyatoslav. In 945 Prince Igor went to the tribe of the Drevlians to gather tributes and the Drevlians killed him. Upon his death Princess Olga took the powers in her hands and became regent, since her son was only 3 years old. The Princess took revenge upon her husband’s death: she buried alive matchmakers from Drevlians who came to her to propose that Olga marry their Prince Mal, then she lured their most distinguished men into a bathhouse, locked the doors and set fire to the building, burning them alive. After that she went to the land of Drevlians in order to gather tributes. The Princess asked that each household present her with a dove as a gift. Then she tied burning papers to the legs of the doves and let them fly back to their homes. As a result, the entire town was destroyed by fire.
As a ruler Olga established the system of tribute gathering, which is sometimes considered to be the first legal tax system in Eastern Europe. She ordered the creation of centers of trade and taxation, divided lands into administrative units, which were controlled by the Princess’s representatives and set fixed amounts of tributes, with a detailed schedule for their gathering. Princess Olga is also thought to have been the initiator of the first stone city building in Rus’.
She was first ruler of Rus’ to convert to Christianity and was baptized in Constantinople in Byzantine Empire. Her son Svyatoslav didn’t support his mother’s decision or her efforts to spread Christianity throughout Rus’ and was worried about losing the respect of the army because of Olga’s new faith, yet after her death he would bury his mother according to Christian customs. It would be Olga’s grandson, Vladimir I (also known as Saint Vladimir, Vladimir the Great or Vladimir the Fair Sun), who in 988 made Christianity the official religion of Rus’.
Olga was canonized as one of the first saints of the Russian Orthodox Church and thus is known as Saint Olga.


Sophia of Lithuania (1371-1453) of the House of Rurik (reign as Regent: 1425-1432)
The only daughter of ruler of Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Vytautas the Great, and wife of Vasily I, Grand Prince of Moscow, from the House of Rurik. She possibly met her future husband while he was a guest at her father’s home while still being a heir to his father, renowned Dmitry Donskoy. Sophia married  Vasily in 1391 and had at least 9 children with him : 5 sons and 4 daughters. Their eldest daughter, Anna, was married to John Palaiologos, subsequently Byzantine Emperor. Their 3 sons died of plague and their youngest and last son, Vasily, was born when Sophia was 44, the birth was difficult, she got sick not long before the birth and was literally at death’s door. Throughout her marriage Sophia was a good helper to her husband both in state and economic affairs.  She had a vast amount of lands in her possession and skillfully governed them. During his reign Vasily I continued reunification of the Russian lands, while dealing with the Golden Horde as the Rus’ at that time was under its dominance. Sophia’s marriage to Vasily helped to secure alliance between her husband and Grand Duchy of Lithuania and use it as prevention against severe attacks from the Golden Horde, though the alliance turned out to be fragile, and they waged war against each other at one point.  Sophia tried to act as mediator between her husband and father.
After Vasily’s death in 1425 Sophia became regent for their 10-year-old son Vasily II. Her husband Vasily bequeathed his wife a lot of lands into possession for life, which provided large income for Sophia and made her into even wealthier lady. She also secured the support from her father for Vasily II’s claim to the throne, as it was disputed by his uncle, Yuri of Zvenigorod. Yet in 1430 Vytautas died and from this time the ongoing battle for the throne started between Vasily II and his uncle, where Sophia would be staunchly fighting for the rights of her son. Sophia arranged marriage for her son and during wedding festivities she tore a golden belt from Vasily’s first cousin as this belt used to belong to Dmity Donskoy and Sophia believed only her son had a right to it. When her son at one point lost throne to his uncle she financed and organized public discontent against Yuri’s rule and Vasily II returned his throne; Yuri made a second attempt and managed to gain the throne for the second time, taking Sophia hostage, sending her away from Moscow, but Vasily II managed to take throne back again, Yuri died and Sophia returned. The troubles didn’t end then. When her son was captured by Golden Horde, Sophia raised an enormous sum of money as a ransom; when Vasily II was captured by his first cousin, Yuri’s son, he was blinded and became known as Vasily the Blind yet still managed to get his throne, with his mother helping to mobilize his supporters. In 1451 while her son was away Horde attacked Moscow and Sophia organized defence of the city, successfully thwarting their attack. Highly pious and devoted to Russian Orthodox Church Sophia patronized and sponsored monasteries and churches, including the famous Ascension Convent in Kremlin. She took the veil there not long before her death, leaving her vast lands to her son and her numerous grandsons as well as several religious artefacts.
Sophia’s grandson, Ivan III (also known as Ivan the Great), ended the dominance of Golden Horde over Rus’, gathered Russian lands, significantly expanding the territory under his rule  and carried out effective reforms, laying foundation for the powerful state.


Elena Glinskaya (c.1508-1538) of the House of Rurik (reign as Regent: 1533-1538)
Daughter of  Prince Vasili Glinsky, a noble from the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, and his wife Serbian Princess Anna Jakšić. Her uncle was  powerful  and wealthy Michael Glinsky, who  began an armed rebellion against Sigismund I, Grand Duke of Lithuania. The rebellion failed and Glinsky family retreated to Russia, where Michael served Vasily III of Russia (son of Ivan III the Great). In 1525 Vasily III resolved to divorce his barren wife, Solomoniya Saburova, with whom he was married for 20 years and had no children, and marry Elena Glinskaya. According to the chronicles, he chose Elena “because of the beauty of her face and her young age.” Elena was beautiful, lively, charming and well-educated (she knew German and Polish, spoke and wrote in Latin). Vasily was so smitten with her, that he even broke the ancient Russian male tradition and shaved his beard. Despite strong opposition from the Russian Orthodox Church Saburova was forced to take the veil and it’s said that she cursed the House of Rurik for it. Vasily married Elena and she gave him the long awaited son Ivan in 1530 and then another son Yuri in 1532. Vasily was overjoyed and doted on his wife and sons, yet whilst out hunting he fell ill and died in 1533. On his deathbed Vasily appointed regency counsel for his 3 year old son Ivan IV until he is mature enough to rule. The boyars from the counsel had to report to Elena. Yet quite soon Elena removed all power from the counsel (including her own uncle who was in it) and took power into her own hands.
During her regency she challenged the claims of her brothers-in-law, Yury Ivanovich and Andrey of Staritsa in order to protect her little son’s rights to the throne from his uncles. The struggle ended with their incarceration in 1534 and 1537, respectively (both died in prison). Elena carried out a currency reform that introduced a unified monetary system in the state and some new currency units, one of those being famous kopeyka. In foreign affairs, Elena succeeded in signing an armistice with Duchy of Lithuania on beneficial terms for Russia in 1537 after three years of war with it, while simultaneously effectively neutralizing Sweden. She had a new defensive wall constructed around Moscow, made an attempt to change the system of home rule which anticipated the reforms of Ivan IV. She is noted to have visited several convents. Yet her rule was almost constantly disputed by boyars. Some of the conflicts in government were caused by Elena’s close association with her supporters, a boyar named Ivan Ovchina-Telepnev-Obolensky (rumored to be her lover) and Metropolitan Daniel. Her uncle Michael criticized her and her rule and was put into prison where he died of starvation. In 1538 Elena suddenly died and was hastily buried. It was rumored that she was poisoned by the Shuiskys - boyars, who usurped power after her death. Forensic studies of her remains carried out  in 20th century  tend to support the thesis that Elena was poisoned.
After Elena’s death her son Ivan IV was left alone, with regency being alternated between several feuding boyar families fighting for control. Treated with respect in public, but humiliated and abused by Shuiskys  in private, sometimes not being given food or new clothes, Ivan developed a ruthless and suspicious nature while growing up  with a hatred towards boyar class. At age 13 he called boyars  to a meeting, condemned them for their neglect of him and the nation and threw the head of Shuisky clan to a pack of hungry hunting dogs, who tore him apart. This action is often seen by historians as act of revenge for his mother Elena. 
In 1547 Ivan IV was crowned as first Tsar of All the Russias, establishing the Tsardom of Russia. A complicated and controversial ruler during his reign he transformed Russia from a medieval state into an emerging Empire. In history he is better known as Ivan the Terrible.


Sophia Alekseyevna (1657-1704) of the House of Romanov (reign as Regent: 1682-1689)
Also known as Tsarevna Sophia. Third surviving daughter of Tsar Alexis of the House of Romanov by his first wife, Maria Miloslavskaya. She was the only one of her sisters educated by Simeon Polotsky who also taught her brothers, Tsar Alexis’ heirs Tsarevich Alexei and Tsarevich Feodor. She grew up to be educated, sharp-witted, headstrong and politically savvy. After death of Tsar Alexis his son Feodor III ruled only for  6 years and died of poor health.  Tsar Alexis left behind him two families by his two wives, both of which boasted at least one male heir after the death of Feodor III. By  Miloslavskaya there was another son, Ivan, and  by  Alexis’s second wife,  Nataliya Naryshkina, there was a son Peter. As the clans of Alexis’ two wives were in conflict, Sophia crafted her scheme to ensure power for herself and her family. Promoting the case of her weak brother Ivan as the legitimate heir to the throne, in 1682 Sophia attempted to convince the patriarch and the boyars that their recent decision to crown Peter should be reversed.  Upon the court’s swift and unanimous rejection of the proposal, Sophia reached out to the discouraged military troops, the Streltsy, for their aid and support. The unjust dismissal of Ivan’s rights acted as a catalyst to the already displeased and frustrated troops and drove the Streltsy to violently oppose the “unjust” election of Peter. After several members of the Naryshkin family were murdered, the fighting ceased and Streltsy received their initial demands. Weak and inept Ivan was crowned senior Tsar as Ivan V and Peter, only 10 years old, junior Tsar as Peter I.  Sophia  assumed the role of regent for the youthful Tsars and  had a double throne constructed for the co-Tsars with a hole cut in the back of it. Sophia would sit behind the throne and listen as Tsars conversed with nobles, while feeding them information and telling them how to answer questions. She arranged marriage for Ivan V, hoping to control his heirs and thus remain in power, but the marriage produced only daughters.
During years of her regency Sophia carried out  improvement of tax assessment and collection, made efforts to eradicate government graft and corruption, improve peasant registration laws, tried to reorganize the army, promoted the development of industry and encouraged foreign craftsmen to settle in Russia. She signed all decrees, and her likeness appeared on all Russian coins, she encouraged the growth of publishing houses. Notably intrigued by baroque style architecture, Sophia actively promoted it. The Slavonic-Greek-Latin Academy, the first Russian higher learning institution, was founded under her reign. The most important highlights of her foreign policy  were the Eternal Peace Treaty of 1686 with Poland on beneficial terms for Russia, the 1689 Treaty of Nerchinsk with China (the first treaty China ever signed with a Western power), and the Crimean campaigns against Turkey which were unsuccessful and caused discontent among general population with her rule.
Her half-brother Peter was growing up and in 1689 he turned 17.  Naryshkins expected Sophia to step down now that Peter was old enough to rule himself.  Meanwhile Peter, who didn’t trust his step-sister, fled to a fortified monastery near Moscow. Sophia summoned him, but he refused to go to her. Then she  tried to rally the Streltsy regiments, nobles, and the populace but her pleas for support fell on deaf ears.  Instead, more and more of the army officials abandoned her to serve Peter. Power was slipping through her hands and soon, she had no choice but to renounce the throne. Peter had her arrested along with her supporters, and confined Sophia to Novodevichy Convent. One of her chief supporters and minister for foreign affairs Vasily  Golitsyn (rumored to be her lover) was exiled. Sophia still had her supporters and in 1698, when Peter was out of the country, Streltsy tried to reinstate Sophia to the throne, but failed. Their revolt was harshly suppressed and many of Streltsy were tortured, executed or exiled. Sophia was forced  to take the veil, was  kept in the strictest seclusion with other nuns not allowed to see her except on Easter day. She died in the Novodevichy Convent 6 years later.
Her half-brother Peter became known as Peter the Great, one of the most outstanding rulers in Russian history, who finalized the transformation of Russia into a major Empire and became first Russian Emperor.


Keep reading

So I never post on Tumblr anymore but I felt like this needed to be put here.

I’m really bad at infographics, but someone asked a question in a group I’m in that merited this one being created.

We always talk a lot about why certain organisations are bad and others are good in the autistic community, but what we don’t usually do is establish where most of those good organisations are and what the GREAT ones are doing on top of that.

Here’s a handy guide we can use when examining local and national organisations! It is in no way comprehensive, of course.

(And yes, it does have a copyright with my real name on it because I really don’t want this being shared without proper credit.)

[Image description: Infographic with title ‘A Guide for Identifying Good Autism Organizations (and how they can improve!)’.

© 2017 Samantha Perry

There is a table with two columns labelled ‘Baseline’ and 'Better’. The text from left to right in each row is transcribed below.

Does the organization have multiple autistic people in their leadership?

Is the organization founded by or run entirely by autistic people?

Does the organization use proper language (identity-first, no functioning labels)?

Does the organization actively renounce and denounce person-first language and functioning labels?

Does the organization avoid imagery such as puzzle pieces or ‘light it up blue’?

Does the organization use neurodiversity imagery such as the rainbow infinity symbol?

Does the organization support legislation that benefits autistic people and reject legislation that harms them?

Does the organization actively campaign for/ against legislation that impacts the autistic community, and encourage civic participation (calling lawmakers, protesting, etc.)?

Does the organization focus on supporting autistic people through self-advocacy?

Does the organization denounce ‘treatments’ and ‘cures’ for autistic people?

Does the organization fundraise only to support its daily operation and not for ‘research’ or ‘treatments’?

Does the organization fundraise to directly benefit autistic people and their families in the local community?

Does the organization validate self-diagnosed autistic people and communicate reasons why many autistic people may be self-diagnosed?

Does the organization actively include self-diagnosed people and work to create solutions within the medical community that reduce barriers to diagnosis?

Does the organization acknowledge autistic adults exist?

Does the organization involve, support, and validate autistic people of all ages?

Is the organization focused on helping autistic people rather than focusing on families and caregivers?

Is the organization focused on pioneering coping strategies and self-advocacy for autistic people, regardless of age or ability?]

10

└ And we learn how Jun tops trumps Sho~ *snickers*

Cr: VS Arashi 2hr SP 13.07.2017

Bonus: Cos I just love when they talk to each other.

Okay but can we just imagine how different JD might’ve been if his mom never died. Whether his dad died instead or they both lived, JD would be so different. He’d have better coping skills, maybe his mom took him to therapy. Maybe instead of letting his violent, hateful thoughts consume him, he wrote it down. Or drew it. Maybe he became an artist of some kind. Maybe he moves to a new high school, meets a girl named Veronica, and he desperately tries to act cool. She seems to buy it. He doesn’t like the Heathers, in fact he hates them, but he and Veronica never hurt anyone. They get angry. At society, at the world. They start to organize protests against injustice. Imagine a JD filled with anger and a need for justice but now he knows how to channel that anger into something good.
Imagine a JD who got the help he needed and became a better person because of it

Black History Month 2017

Planned Parenthood strives to create a world where sexual and reproductive health care is accessible, affordable, and compassionate — no matter what.

Black women have always championed reproductive freedom and the elimination of racism and sexism as an essential element of the struggle toward civil rights. This Black History Month, Planned Parenthood honors the resilience of Black women like Dr. N. Louise Young and Dr. Thelma Patten Law,  two of the first Black women health care providers at Planned Parenthood — and the resistance of women like Angela Davis who continue to fight for the full dignity, autonomy and the humanity of all women.

In commemoration of Black History Month each year, we lift up and celebrate those who have defied their time and circumstances to become Dream Keepers and freedom fighters. #100YearsStrong of Planned Parenthood could not be possible without the vision, tenacity and determination of those who have kept and protected the dream of reproductive freedom, justice and autonomy.

The 2017 Dream Keepers

Ida B. Wells-Barnett
Journalist, Civil Rights Activist

Ida B. Wells-Barnett was the most prominent Black woman journalist of the late 19th and early 20th century. Her research and reporting around the lynching of Black people helped to bring national attention to the crisis and pushed federal legislation to hold mobs accountable.

Marsha P. Johnson
Activist, Stonewall Rioter

Marsha P. Johnson, co-founder of the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR), is credited with being one of the first people to resist the police during the Stonewall Riots of 1969. On the commemorative anniversary of the riots in 1970, Johnson led protesters to the Women’s Detention Center of New York chanting, “Free our sisters. Free ourselves,” which demonstrated early solidarity between LGBTQ rights and anti-prison movements.

Former Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm
Black Feminist, Former Presidential Candidate

In 1990, Shirley Chisholm — along with former Planned Parenthood Federation of America president Faye Wattleton, Byllye Avery, Donna Brazile, Dorothy Height, Maxine Waters, and Julianne Malveaux (among others) — formed the group African American Women for Reproductive Freedom to show their support for Roe v. Wade, doing so with what we now call a reproductive -justice framework. The former New York representative was the first African American woman elected to Congress. During her seven terms, Rep. Chisholm pioneered the Congressional Black Caucus and was an unwavering champion for women’s reproductive rights and access to health care, including abortion. In 2015, President Obama awarded Rep. Chisholm with the Presidential Medal of Freedom Award.

Dr. N. Louise Young

Dr. N. Louise Young, a gynecologist and obstetrician, opened her practice in Baltimore in 1932. She later operated a Planned Parenthood health center that was opened with the assistance of the local Urban League and other community partners.

Dr. Thelma Patten Law

Dr. Thelma Patten Law becomes one of the first Black women ob-gyns in Texas. She provided health care for more than 25 years at the Planned Parenthood Houston Health Center, which opened in 1936.

Faye Wattleton
Author, Advocate for Reproductive Freedom, Former President of PPFA

In 1978, Wattleton became the youngest individual at the time and the first African American woman to serve as president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA). During Wattleton’s 14–year tenure, PPFA became one of the nation’s largest charitable organizations. Under Wattleton’s leadership, the organization secured federal funding for birth control and prenatal programs; fought against efforts to restrict legal abortions; and, along with reproductive health allies, helped to legalize the sale of abortion pill RU-486 in the United States.

The Coiners of Reproductive Justice

Black women’s existence has inherently challenged the “choice vs. life” argument. However the creation and coining of reproductive justice ushered in a new framework where women of color could express all of the ways their sexual and reproductive autonomy is systemically limited.

Dr. Dorothy Roberts
Author, Scholar, Professor

Dorothy Roberts is an acclaimed scholar of race, gender and the law. Her books include Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-first Century (New Press, 2011); Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare (Basic Books, 2002), and Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty (Pantheon, 1997) — all of which have shaped and informed scholarship around reproductive justice.

@DorothyERoberts


Monica Roberts
Historian, Founder and Editor-In-Chief of TransGriot

Monica Roberts, aka the TransGriot, is a native Houstonian and trailblazing trans community leader. She works diligently at educating and encouraging acceptance of trans people inside and outside the larger African-American community and is an award-winning blogger, history buff, thinker, lecturer and passionate advocate on trans issues.


Dr. Iva Carruthers
Past President of Urban Outreach Foundation, General Secretary of the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference

Carruthers uses her ministry as a vehicle for addressing social issues, particularly those involving people of African descent both in the United States and abroad. She is past president of the Urban Outreach Foundation, a nonprofit, interdenominational organization that assists African and African-American communities with education, health care, and community development.

@IvaCarruthers



Rev. Dr. Alethea Smith-Withers
Founder and Pastor; The Pavilion of God, Washington, DC; and Chair of the Board of Directors for Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice

Rev. Smith-Withers has been an active advocate for reproductive justice for many years. She is currently serving as the chair of the board of directors of Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice (RCRC). She is the founder and pastor of The Pavilion of God, a Baptist Church in DC.  She hosts “Rev UP with Rev. Alethea”, a BlogTalkRadio show.

@RevAlethea


Rev. Dr. Susan Moore
Associate Minister at All Souls Church Unitarian

Dr. Moore’s ministry has focused upon the challenges facing urban America. An HIV/AIDS and teen pregnancy prevention educator and trainer, she has worked with several community and faith-based groups, including the DC Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Planned Parenthood, and AIDS Action Foundation. She actively advocates for a national, coordinated AIDS strategy to reduce racial disparities, lower the incidence of infection, increase access to care, and involve all stakeholders.


Bevy Smith
CEO and Founder of Dinner with Bevy

A Harlem native and New York fashion fixture, Smith is outspoken about women’s empowerment and social justice. She gives back by connecting and engaging a network of top leaders to promote social change.

@bevysmith


Mara Brock Akil
Screenwriter and producer and founder of Akil Productions

Mara Brock Akil is the co-creator of hit TV shows Girlfriends, The Game, and Being Mary Jane.  She is a tireless advocate of women’s health and rights.

@MaraBrockAkil


Tracy Reese
American fashion designer

Relentless PPFA supporter, Reese is a board member of the Council of Fashion Designers of America.

@Tracy_Reese


Kimberlé W. Crenshaw
Scholar, Professor at the UCLA and Columbia Schools of Law

Kimberlé W. Crenshaw is a feminist scholar and writer who coined the term “Intersectionality.” Kimberlé  is the co-founder of the African American Policy Forum, which developed seminal research on Black women and girls and the school-to-prison pipeline and policing, including, respectively: “Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected” and “Say Her Name.”

@SandyLocks

Angela Peoples
Co-Director of GetEqual

Serving as the Co-Director of GetEqual, Angela is working to ensure that Black lives and gender justice is a guiding force in LGBTQ work.

@MsPeoples


Jazmine Walker
Reproductive Justice Leader

Jazmine is a big fine woman who specializes in reproductive justice and agricultural economic development.

Her dedication to public scholarship and activism is driven by a passion to amplify feminist and reproductive justice discourse around Black women and girls, especially those in Mississippi and the broader South.


Amandla Stenberg
Actress, Author

This Black queer feminist makes us look forward to the next generation of feminist leaders and thinkers.

Her YouTube video, “Don’t Cash Crop My Cornrows,” clapped-back against the cultural appropriation of Black fashion and style and won our hearts.

@amandlastenbergs


Charlene A. Carruthers
National Director for Black Youth Project 100

Political organizer Carruthers is building a national network and local teams of young Black activists.  She is committed to racial justice, feminism, and youth leadership development.

@CharleneCac


Monica Simpson
Executive Director of SisterSong National Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective

At SisterSong National Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, Simpson works to amplify and strengthen the collective voices of indigenous women and women of color to ensure reproductive justice through securing human rights. She has organized extensively against the systematic physical and emotional violence inflicted upon the minds, bodies, and spirits of African Americans with an emphasis on African-American women and the African-American LGBT community.

@SisterSong_WOC


Deon Haywood
Executive Director, Women With A Vision, Inc.

Haywood works tirelessly to improve quality of life and health outcomes for marginalized women of color.  Since Hurricane Katrina, Haywood has led Women With a Vision, a New Orleans-based community organization addressing the complex intersection of socio-economic injustices and health disparities.  

@WWAVinc


Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee
Congresswoman, D-TX 18th District

Congresswoman Jackson Lee has been a staunch supporter of Planned Parenthood and women’s health.

This year she has become a valuable champion as a member of the House Judiciary Committee, where she was vocal at both hearings displaying a clear understanding of the important role Planned Parenthood health centers play in the communities they serve. She also came to the floor on several occasions and attended a Planned Parenthood’s press conference, lending her voice in the fight against backwards legislation.

@JacksonLeeTX18


Del. Stacey Plaskett
Congresswoman, D-US-VI

Delegate Stacey Plaskett became a supporter of Planned Parenthood this year when she spoke out for Planned Parenthood health center patients during a Oversight and Government Reform hearing, where she is a member, commenting that she would like a Planned Parenthood health center in the Virgin Islands.

@StaceyPlaskett


Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton
Congresswoman, D-DC

As a fierce, passionate, Black feminist and reproductive health advocate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton has supported Planned Parenthood unwaveringly. She also sponsored the EACH Woman Act and, in 2015, held an event with young women on abortion access.

@EleanorNorton


Rep. Joyce Beatty
Congresswoman, D-OH 3rd District

Rep. Beatty has been an active supporter of women’s health during her tenure in Congress, cosponsoring legislation, signing onto pro-letters and always voting in the interest of women’s health.


Rep. Maxine Waters
Congresswoman, D-CA 43rd District

Since arriving in office in 1990, Rep. Waters has voted in the best interest of the health of women and communities of color, making a career of addressing these issues by closing the wealth gap.