organic farming

npr.org
Organic Industry Sues USDA To Push For Animal Welfare Rules
New rules — such as giving chickens more space to roam — were approved by the Obama administration, but put on hold under Trump. Now the organic industry is suing the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The organic eggs in your grocery store are supposed to come from chickens that have year-round access to the outdoors. That’s according to long-standing organic regulations.

But a huge battle has erupted over what “access to the outdoors” actually means. And it’s now led to a lawsuit: The Organic Trade Association, which represents most organic food companies, is suing the government, demanding that it implement new rules that require organic egg producers to give their chickens more room to roam.

i love that lesbian culture is just like, wanting to have a wife, going to farmers markets + dreaming of having your own farm someday, organic produce and like herbalism and astrology

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Straw Bale Gardening

One of the thriftiest, most versatile ways to garden is what’s called Straw Bale gardening. Often cheaper than garden soil or fertilizer, straw bales are found virtually everywhere. Craigslist, home depot or other home improvement stores will sell them for pennies on the dime when push comes to shove.

But what can you grow?

The answer: just about anything.

Moisture and heat collect in the straw bale like a trap. Tomatoes, corn and other tall plants can break the bale apart the taller they get, but potatoes and herbs will thrive in your bale. 

Hay bales start to decompose just hours after they get wet and can provide an atmosphere better than your greenhouse. By digging a hole into your bale, dropping in some soil around your plants and packing it firmly, you’ll add some stability to your plant and as your bale decomposes, it will provide a steady source of nutrition all throughout the growing season.

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Eighteen years ago, on New Year’s Eve, David Fisher visited an old farm in western Massachusetts, near the small town of Conway. No one was farming there at the time, and that’s what had drawn Fisher to the place. He was scouting for farmland.

“I remember walking out [to the fallow fields] at some point,” Fisher recalls. “And in the moonlight – it was all snowy – it was like a blank canvas.”

On that blank canvas, Fisher’s mind painted a picture of what could be there alongside the South River. He could see horses tilling the land – no tractors, no big machinery – and vegetable fields, and children running around.

This is David Fisher’s American Dream. It may not be the conventional American Dream of upward economic mobility. But dreams like his have a long tradition in this country. Think of the Puritans and the Shakers and the Amish. These American dreams are the uncompromising pursuit of a difficult ideal.

By Returning To Farming’s Roots, He Found His American Dream

Photos: Dan Charles/NPR

An organic farmer is the best peacemaker today, because there is more violence, more death, more destruction, more wars, through a violent industrial agricultural system. And to shift away from that into an agriculture of peace is what organic farming is doing.
—  Environmental activist Vandana Shiva
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It’s been a long long long time since I have updated any of you!! I know I have been Mia but I’ve been missing you all and hopefully will be returning for good now :)

I am still living in Vermont, just outside of Killington mountain. So grateful to be living in my little cabin with my chickens and my greenhouse. I quit my full time job a month ago to peruse my herbal skin, hair and wellness business as well as focus on massage and Reiki healing. I COULDN’T BE HAPPIER!!

life is good…I am hoping to keep updating regularity and filling you all in with cool pictures and stories :)

As always please reach out!! :)