organic facts

When a male character and a female character in a movie/TV show start giving each other the Meaningful Look™

Me:

News Flash

Criticizing Joss Whedon’s problematic writing choices does not translate to hate.

Also, word of advice, if you want people to stop accusing you of being racist or sexist, then you might want to stay away from the following:

  • Having the lead female protagonist of your show almost raped by her love interest and then have the showrunner praise the rapist as being his favorite character and having the best character development (Spike, Buffy the Vampire Slayer)
  • Plan to have a prostitute gang raped to feed into the character development of her male love interest (Inara, Firefly)
  • Have a show that heavily features Asian culture and religions, but then fail to cast any Asian actors (Firefly)
  • Claim that having Asian actors was unnecessary because one of your white actors “kind of looked Asian.” (Summer Glau, Firefly)
  • Fire your lead actress for getting pregnant and then spend the next season shitting all over her character (Charisma Carpenter, Angel)
  • Inviting that lead actress to come back to the show, promising her that she’ll stick around until the final episode, only to turn around and kill her character off at the last moment as revenge (Charisma Carpenter, Angel)
  • Creating the single most racist depiction of a black female character by making her violent, savage, animalistic and so dumb that she isn’t even able to speak, and then reveal that the way she became the first slayer, was by having a group of old men force a demon into her body without her consent (The First Slayer, Buffy the Vampire Slayer)
  • Have one of the most popular female superheroes referred to as a “cunt” by the main villain (Natasha Romanoff, Avengers)
  • Claim that because a female character was unable to have children, that she was considered a monster (Natasha Romanoff, Avengers: Age of Ultron)
  • Taking one of the strongest female superheroes in the MCU and turning her into an outlet for her male love interest to pour his man angst all over and then completely dump her in the end without any expression of gratitude for all she did for him (Natasha Romanoff, Avengers: Age of Ultron)
  • Have one of the most popular superheroes in the MCU joke about raping women (Tony Stark, Avengers: Age of Ultron)
  • Feature two characters who were originally of Jewish-Romani descent and then have them whitewashed by hiring white actors to play them (Wanda Maximoff and Pietro Maximoff, Avengers: Age of Ultron)
  • Having two Jewish-Romani characters volunteer for a Nazi organization, despite the fact that Jewish and Romani people were victims of the Holocaust (Wanda Maximoff and Pietro Maximoff, Avengers: Age of Ultron)
  • Have the audacity to redefine feminism and re-brand it because he found feminism distasteful.
  • Constantly using the “break the cutie” trope to punish his supposedly “strong female characters.” (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly, Avengers: Age of Ultron)
  • Using the threat of sexual violence against his lead female protagonists on multiple occasions (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly, Avengers)

Check yourself, fandom. These criticisms of Joss Whedon’s work have been long-standing and are completely valid. So, before you get on your high horse and try to accuse his detractors of being bitter fangirls, take a look at all the fucked up shit your problematic fav has said and done, and then we’ll talk.

Top Misconceptions People Have about Pulp-Era Science Fiction

A lot of people I run into have all kinds of misconceptions about what pulp-era scifi, from the 1920s-1950s, was actually like. 


“Pulp-Era Science Fiction was about optimistic futures.”

Optimistic futures were always, always vastly outnumbered by end of the world stories with mutants, Frankenstein creations that turn against us, murderous robot rebellions, terrifying alien invasions, and atomic horror. People don’t change. Then as now, we were more interested in hearing about how it could all go wrong. 

To quote H.L. Gold, editor of Galaxy Science Fiction, in 1952: 

“Over 90% of stories submitted to Galaxy Science Fiction still nag away at atomic, hydrogen and bacteriological war, the post atomic world, reversion to barbarism, mutant children killed because they have only ten toes and fingers instead of twelve….the temptation is strong to write, ‘look, fellers, the end isn’t here yet.’”

The movie Tomorrowland is a particulary egregious example of this tremendous misconception (and I can’t believe Brad Bird passed on making Force Awakens to make a movie that was 90 minutes of driving through the Florida swamps). In reality, pre-1960s scifi novels trafficked in dread, dystopian futures, and fear. There was simply never a time when optimistic scifi was overrepresented, even the boyish Jules Verne became skeptical of the possibilities of technology all the way at the turn of the century. One of the most famous pulp scifi yarns was Jack Williamson’s The Humanoids, about a race of Borg-like robots who so totally micromanage humans “for our own protection” that they leave us with nothing to do but wait “with folded hands.”


“Pulp scifi often featured muscular, large-chinned, womanizing main characters.”

Here’s the image often used in parodies of pulp scifi: the main character is a big-chinned, ultra-muscular dope in tights who is a compulsive womanizer and talks like Adam West in Batman. Whenever I see this, I think to myself…what exactly is it they’re making fun of?

It’s more normal than you think to find parodies of things that never actually existed. Mystery buffs and historians, for example, can’t find a single straight example of “the Butler did it.” It’s a thing people think is a thing that was never a thing, and another example would be the idea of the “silent film villain” in a mustache and top hat (which there are no straight examples of, either). There are no non-parody examples of Superman changing in a phone booth; he just never did this.

In reality, my favorite description of pulp mag era science fiction heroes is that they are “wisecracking Anglo-Saxon engineers addicted to alcohol and tobacco who like nothing better than to explain things to others that they already know.” The average pulp scifi hero had speech patterns best described as “Mid-Century American Wiseass” than like Adam West or the Lone Ranger. 

The nearest the Spaceman Spiff stereotype came to hitting the mark was with the magazine heroes of the Lensmen and Captain Future, and they’re both nowhere near close. Captain Future was a muscular hero with a chin, but he also had a Captain Picard level desire to use diplomacy first, and believed that most encounters with aliens were only hostile due to misunderstandings and lack of communication (and the story makes him right). He also didn’t seem interested in women, mostly because he had better things to do for the solar system and didn’t have the time for love. The Lensmen, on the other hand, had a ruthless, bloodthirsty streak, and were very much like the “murder machine” Brock Sampson (an attitude somewhat justified by the stakes in their struggle). 


“Pulp Era Scifi were mainly action/adventure stories with good vs. evil.” 

This is a half-truth, since, like so much other genre fiction, scifi has always been sugared up with fight scenes and chases. And there was a period, early in the century, when most scifi followed the Edgar Rice Burroughs model and were basically just Westerns or swashbucklers with different props, ray guns instead of six-shooters. But the key thing to remember is how weird so much of this scifi was, and that science fiction, starting in the mid-1930s, eventually became something other than just adventure stories with different trappings. 

One of my favorite examples of this is A. Bertram Chandler’s story, “Giant-Killer.” The story is about rats on a starship who acquire intelligence due to proximity to the star drive’s radiation, and who set about killing the human crew one by one. Another great example is Eando Binder’s Adam Link stories, told from the point of view of a robot who is held responsible for the death of his creator.

What’s more, one of the best writers to come out of this era is best known for never having truly evil bad guys: Isaac Asimov. His “Caves of Steel,” published in 1953, had no true villains. The Spacers, who we assumed were snobs, only isolated themselves because they had no immunities to the germs of earth.


“Racism was endemic to the pulps.”

It is absolutely true that the pulps reflected the unconscious views of society as a whole at the time, but as typical of history, the reality was usually much more complex than our mental image of the era. For instance, overt racism was usually shown as villainous: in most exploration magazines like Adventure, you can typically play “spot the evil asshole we’re not supposed to like” by seeing who calls the people of India “dirty monkeys” (as in Harold Lamb). 

Street & Smith, the largest of all of the pulp publishers, had a standing rule in the 1920s-1930s to never to use villains who were ethnic minorities because of the fear of spreading race hate by negative portrayals. In fact, in one known case, the villain of Resurrection Day was going to be a Japanese General, but the publisher demanded a revision and he was changed to an American criminal. Try to imagine if a modern-day TV network made a rule that minority groups were not to be depicted as gang bangers or drug dealers, for fear that this would create prejudice when people interact with minority groups in everyday life, and you can see how revolutionary this policy was. It’s a mistake to call this era very enlightened, but it’s also a mistake to say everyone born before 1970 was evil.


“Pulp scifi writers in the early days were indifferent to scientific reality and played fast and loose with science.”

 FALSE.

 This is, by an order of magnitude, the most false item on this list.

In fact, you might say that early science fiction fandom were obsessed with scientific accuracy to the point it was borderline anal retentive. Nearly every single one of the lettercols in Astounding Science Fiction were nitpickers fussing about scientific details. In fact, modern scifi fandom’s grudging tolerance for storytelling necessities like sound in space at the movies, or novels that use “hyperspace” are actually something of a step down from what the culture around scifi was in the 1920s-1950s. Part of it was due to the fact that organized scifi fandom came out of science clubs; Hugo Gernsback created the first scifi pulp magazine as a way to sell electronics and radio equipment to hobbyists, and the “First Fandom” of the 1930s were science enthusiasts who talked science first and the fiction that speculated about it second.

In retrospect, a lot of it was just plain obvious insecurity: in a new medium considered “kid’s stuff,” they wanted to show scifi was plausible, relevant, and something different from “fairy tales.” It’s the same insecure mentality that leads video gamers to repeatedly ask if games are art. You’ve got nothing to prove there, guys, calm down (and take it from a pulp scifi aficionado, the most interesting things are always done in the period when a medium is considered disposable trash). 

One of the best examples was the famous Howard P. Lovecraft, who published “The Shadow out of Time” in the 1936 issue of Astounding. Even though it might be the only thing from that issue that is even remotely reprinted today, the letters page from this issue practically rose up in revolt against this story as not being based on accurate science. Lovecraft was never published in Astounding ever again.

If you ever wanted to find out what Star Wars would be like if they were bigger hardasses about scientific plausibility, check out E.E. Smith’s Lensman series. People expect a big, bold, brassy space opera series with heroes and villains to play fast and loose, but it was shockingly scientifically grounded.

To be fair, science fiction was not a monolith on this. One of the earliest division in science fiction was between the Astounding Science Fiction writers based in New York, who often had engineering and scientific backgrounds and had left-wing (in some cases, literally Communist) politics, and the Amazing Stories writers based in the Midwest, who were usually self taught, and had right-wing, heartland politics. Because the Midwestern writers in Amazing Stories were often self-taught, they had a huge authority problem with science and played as fast and loose as you could get. While this is true, it’s worth noting science fiction fandom absolutely turned on Amazing Stories for this, especially when the writers started dabbling with spiritualism and other weirdness like the Shaver Mystery. And to this day, it’s impossible to find many Amazing Stories tales published elsewhere.

i know i say this all the time, but this is actually the worst thing i’ve ever seen

So @your-biology-is-wrong wrote this excellent post, which attracted some wrongheaded comments and a lengthy, well-documented, frankly stunning rebuttal by @millenniumvulcan.  I recommend you go read them.

But the whole conversation got me thinking.

I’ve been saying for some years now that we’re teaching science terribly wrong in schools, and quite possibly the wrongest thing we’re doing is making no distinction between “facts about the universe that we have observed” and “categories and models that we have constructed in order to organize the facts we have observed”.

Essentially, kids are being taught that “cats are mammals” is the same kind of scientific fact as “cats give birth to live young,” and it isn’t.  At all.

Which is why we get discussions like the one linked above.  Or like the ones about Pluto being declared a dwarf planet instead of a planet, where people assert that the change in nomenclature is because “we understand better now what a planet is” and not because we’ve chosen to narrow the definition to (disputably) better organize our constructed categories of Things In Space.  Or, for that matter, like the ones that call out “scientific error” in the Bible by citing references to calling a bat a “bird,” or calling a whale a “fish,” as though the classification system we use today is objective scientific fact instead of constructed model.

Because nobody is teaching kids how to tell the difference, or even that there is a difference.

MBTI Types’ Shadow

“The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge.” ~ Carl Jung

ESTP

Flexible and tolerant, they take a pragmatic approach focused on immediate results. Theories and conceptual explanations bore them – they want to act energetically to solve the problem. Focus on the here-and-now, spontaneous, enjoy each moment that they can be active with others. Enjoy material comforts and style. Learn best through doing.

  • ESTP  Shadow: ISTJ.
    Can become stubborn about their perception of the past and fixated on its relation to the present (Si). Can become critical, disgruntled with disorder, illogical, or inefficiency (Te). Rigidly following a belief system or what they personally think is important, with accompanying childish and/or selfish behaviour (Fi). Over-reading between the lines, often misinterpreting someone’s actions and seeing negative intentions where there are none (Ne).

ISTP

Tolerant and flexible, quiet observers until a problem appears, then act quickly to find workable solutions. Analyze what makes things work and readily get through large amounts of data to isolate the core of practical problems. Interested in cause and effect, organize facts using logical principles, value efficiency.

  • ISTP Shadow: ESTJ
    Can become stubborn about organising things and insist on a systematic approach (Te). Prefer not to focus on the past but can be quite critical of past performances and overuse negative experiences to inform decisions (Si). Interpret situations in a naive way, inferring malice where none exists (Ne). Spend money and time on things that are unimportant and care little about the value of things (Fi).

ESFP

Outgoing, friendly, and accepting. Exuberant lovers of life, people, and material comforts. Enjoy working with others to make things happen. Bring common sense and a realistic approach to their work, and make work fun. Flexible and spontaneous, adapt readily to new people and environments. Learn best by trying a new skill with other people.

  • ESFP Shadow: ISFJ
    Can become stubborn about their perception of the past and fixated on its relation to the present (Si). Can be quite critical and disgruntled about the expectations of the group to the point of rebellion and disengaging (Fe). May make statements or believe in ideas that are contradictory and illogical (Ti). Over-reading between the lines, often misinterpreting someone’s actions and seeing negative intentions where there are none (Ne).

ISFP

Quiet, friendly, sensitive, and kind. Enjoy the present moment, what’s going on around them. Like to have their own space and to work within their own time frame. Loyal and committed to their values and to people who are important to them. Dislike disagreements and conflicts, do not force their opinions or values on others.

  • ISFP Shadow: ESFJ
    Stubborn about how others affect them and resist being pulled into being responsible for others feelings and choices (Fe). Prefer not to focus on the past but can be quite critical of past performances and overuse negative experiences to inform decisions (Si). Interpret situations in a naive way, inferring malice where none exists (Ne). Caught up in pointing out others’ inconsistencies, with a dogmatic tendency to adhere to one principle rather than seeing its distinctions (Ti).

ESTJ

Practical, realistic, matter-of-fact. Decisive, quickly move to implement decisions. Organize projects and people to get things done, focus on getting results in the most efficient way possible. Take care of routine details. Have a clear set of logical standards, systematically follow them and want others to also. Forceful in implementing their plans.

  • ESTJ Shadow: ISTP
    Can be stubborn about the models and principles they’ve adopted, categorising everything simplistically and robotically following the principles (Ti). Go on about “facts,” blocking others’ proposed actions, or get caught up in the moment and engage in impulsive behaviour (Se). Envision how something will play out and ignore signs that it won’t work out, foreseeing disaster or nothing at all (Ni). Convinced others don’t like, appreciate, or need them, and over-accommodate others needs (Fe)

ISTJ

Quiet, serious, earn success by thoroughness and dependability. Practical, matter-of-fact, realistic, and responsible. Decide logically what should be done and work toward it steadily, regardless of distractions. Take pleasure in making everything orderly and organized – their work, their home, their life. Value traditions and loyalty.

  • ISTJ Shadow: ESTP
    Stubborn about going on impulse and insist that they have an accurate read of the situation (Se). Prefer not to articulate operating principles and can get stuck in models and frameworks they have learned or adapted (Ti). Over-address others’ concerns and feel disappointment over a false sense of closeness (Fe). Make dire predictions with certainty and mistake deep symbolism as a guidepost for life (Ni).

ESFJ

Warmhearted, conscientious, and cooperative. Want harmony in their environment, work with determination to establish it. Like to work with others to complete tasks accurately and on time. Loyal, follow through even in small matters. Notice what others need in their day-by-day lives and try to provide it. Want to be appreciated for who they are and for what they contribute.

  • ESFJ Shadow: ISFP
    Be stubborn about values as they crusade for a particular cause, turning off people instead of mobilising them (Fi). Go on about “facts,” blocking others’ proposed actions, or get caught up in the moment and engage in impulsive behaviour (Se). Envision how something will play out and ignore signs that it won’t work out, foreseeing disaster or nothing at all (Ni). analyse, lash out if others criticise their logic with emotional arguments, and make subjective arguments (Te).

ISFJ

Quiet, friendly, responsible, and conscientious. Committed and steady in meeting their obligations. Thorough, painstaking, and accurate. Loyal, considerate, notice and remember specifics about people who are important to them, concerned with how others feel. Strive to create an orderly and harmonious environment at work and at home.

  • ISFJ Shadow: ESFP
    Stubborn about going on impulse and insist that they have an accurate read of the situation (Se). Dwell on conflicts in beliefs, being critical, and locking into their desires by bulldozing others (Fi). Spend unnecessary time establishing order, planning, and misguide themselves and others in the process (Te). Make dire predictions with certainty and mistake deep symbolism as a guidepost for life (Ni)

ENTJ

Frank, decisive, assume leadership readily. Quickly see illogical and inefficient procedures and policies, develop and implement comprehensive systems to solve organizational problems. Enjoy long-term planning and goal setting. Usually well informed, well read, enjoy expanding their knowledge and passing it on to others. Forceful in presenting their ideas.

  • ENTJ Shadow: INTP
    Can be stubborn about the models and principles they’ve adopted, categorising everything simplistically and robotically following the principles (Ti). Oblivious to unspoken potentials and get off track with inferences and interconnections (Ne). Cling to what they are used to; repeat themselves in ritualistic fashion (Si). Convinced others don’t like, appreciate, or need them, and over-accommodate others’ needs (Fe).

INTJ

Have original minds and great drive for implementing their ideas and achieving their goals. Quickly see patterns in external events and develop long-range explanatory perspectives. When committed, organize a job and carry it through. Skeptical and independent, have high standards of competence and performance – for themselves and others.

  • INTJ Shadow: ENTP
    Be stubborn about responding to emerging information and locking on to a hidden meaning (Ne). Prefer not to articulate operating principles and can get stuck in models and frameworks they have learned or adapted (Ti). Over-address others’ concerns and feel disappointment over a false sense of closeness (Fe). Get stuck in impressions of how things were and resist change; waste time reviewing the impact of the past (Si).

ENTP

Quick, ingenious, stimulating, alert, and outspoken. Resourceful in solving new and challenging problems. Adept at generating conceptual possibilities and then analyzing them strategically. Good at reading other people. Bored by routine, will seldom do the same thing the same way, apt to turn to one new interest after another.

  • ENTP Shadow: INTJ
    Be stubborn about perceptions of how the future will be, and lock onto a vision that won’t happen (Ni). Can become critical, disgruntled with disorder, illogic, or inefficiency (Te). Rigidly following a belief system or what they personally think is important, with accompanying childish and/or selfish behaviour (Fi). Excessively seek physical stimulation or following the urge to do nothing; zero in on isolated details, acting impulsively on them (Se).

INTP

Seek to develop logical explanations for everything that interests them. Theoretical and abstract, interested more in ideas than in social interaction. Quiet, contained, flexible, and adaptable. Have unusual ability to focus in depth to solve problems in their area of interest. Skeptical, sometimes critical, always analytical.

  • INTP Shadow: ENTJ
    Can become stubborn about organising things and insist on a systematic approach (Te). Indulge negative thoughts of how events will unfold (Ni). Dwell on the perceived “realities” of a situation; act highly impulsively (Se). Spend money and time on things that are unimportant and care little about the value of things (Fi).

ENFJ

Warm, empathetic, responsive, and responsible. Highly attuned to the emotions, needs, and motivations of others. Find potential in everyone, want to help others fulfill their potential. May act as catalysts for individual and group growth. Loyal, responsive to praise and criticism. Sociable, facilitate others in a group, and provide inspiring leadership.

  • ENFJ Shadow: INFP
    Be stubborn about values as they crusade for a particular cause, turning off people instead of mobilising them (Fi). Oblivious to unspoken potentials and get off track with inferences and interconnections (Ne). Cling to what they are used to; repeat themselves in ritualistic fashion (Si). analyse, lash out if others criticise their logic with emotional arguments, and make subjective arguments (Te).

INFJ

Seek meaning and connection in ideas, relationships, and material possessions. Want to understand what motivates people and are insightful about others. Conscientious and committed to their firm values. Develop a clear vision about how best to serve the common good. Organized and decisive in implementing their vision.

  • INFJ Shadow: ENFP
    Be stubborn about responding to emerging information and locking on to a hidden meaning (Ne). Dwell on conflicts in beliefs, being critical, and locking into their desires by bulldozing others (Fi). Spend unnecessary time establishing order, planning, and misguide themselves and others in the process (Te). Get stuck in impressions of how things were and resist change; waste time reviewing the impact of the past (Si)

ENFP

Warmly enthusiastic and imaginative. See life as full of possibilities. Make connections between events and information very quickly, and confidently proceed based on the patterns they see. Want a lot of affirmation from others, and readily give appreciation and support. Spontaneous and flexible, often rely on their ability to improvise and their verbal fluency.

  • ENFP Shadow: INFJ
    Be stubborn about perceptions of how the future will be, and lock onto a vision that won’t happen (Ni). Can be quite critical and disgruntled about the expectations of the group to the point of rebellion and disengaging (Fe). May make statements or believe in ideas that are contradictory and illogical (Ti). Excessively seek physical stimulation or following the urge to do nothing; zero in on isolated details, acting impulsively on them (Se)

INFP

Idealistic, loyal to their values and to people who are important to them. Want an external life that is congruent with their values. Curious, quick to see possibilities, can be catalysts for implementing ideas. Seek to understand people and to help them fulfill their potential. Adaptable, flexible, and accepting unless a value is threatened.

  • INFP Shadow: ENFJ
    Stubborn about how others affect them and resist being pulled into being responsible for others feelings and choices (Fe). Indulge negative thoughts of how events will unfold (Ni). Dwell on the perceived “realities” of a situation; act highly impulsively (Se). Caught up in pointing out others’ inconsistencies, with a dogmatic tendency to adhere to one principle rather than seeing its distinctions (Ti).

anonymous asked:

Sorry I know that you are busy but how do you think about James and Lena dating?

Hey there! No need to apologize, I’m always happy to answer questions.

I actually spoke to a mutual about this earlier today, so I’m essentially just going to break down the same points I made with her.


First off, based on what we know, I don’t like it. And before people check my URL and bio and shell out the accusations, no it’s not because I’m all “🚨👏🚨👏🚨👏BUT SUPERCORP IS ENDGAME!!11!!! RIP!!! FIGHT ME!!!🚨👏🚨👏🚨👏” So miss me with that. No, I’m gonna be objective and critical about this, and also throw in my opinion. Keep in mind, that yes, some of these points are quite critical to James as a character in certain situations. But only because, realistically, these arguments all point to why a romance is probably not a good idea. -Deep breath-I hope they don’t do it and here is why:

James vs. Kara & Lena 

1) Last season Kara and James spent a decent amount of time being at odds. Because of Guardian, because of him being childishly jealous that SG got more love and appreciation than Guardian, and because of the fact that James spent a healthy amount of time talking trash about Lena. He hadn’t even met her and that’s all he could do – judge her because of her name, condemn her to being just like her brother (”They grew up in the same house!”), and talk crap/whine. Now yes, this is how James is. Things are usually black and white with him – but that only furthers the point that throwing them into a relationship doesn’t make much sense.

2) When Kara made the valid point of saying all Lena has done is help, the incredulous look she got from James was very telling. Even when Kara showed that she trusted Lena in Luthors, James whined and made it about him, “I don’t understand why you keep defending her!”

Relevance? He literally tried to wedge himself between a strong, healthy, female friendship because of his hurt feelings, bruised ego, and prejudice. Who does that? Not impressed, James. Earlier, in that same episode, Kara set out and did everything she could to try and convince her friends and prove Lena’s innocence. But…

James puts himself in harms way in order to prove she’s guilty? Even after acknowledging that she was Kara’s friend. That isn’t something a hero or a friend does and was entirely out of spite. Again, not impressive, Mr. Olsen.

Cliche! Cliche!! Cliche!!! 

3) So due to those two points alone, the idea of throwing them together (for what reason??) is a bit ridiculous. If you stand back and take a look at it, all it does is recycle a bit of the K*ramel romance pattern: Throwing your prejudice to the wind and turning it into romance. In general, there is nothing wrong with that sentiment, but again, it’s recycled and therefore tired in the SG universe. Doing it in back to back seasons is lazy. Forcing and rushing the romance, is equally so.

4) Again, for what reason would this romance happen? Other than the writers’ need to seemingly pair up every character with someone, anyone? The idea of James being so venomous and childish when it comes to Lena in S2, only for him to take a bullet for her in S3, which leads me to the speculation that the writers (due to their lack of creativity and innovation) will start out the romance this way, is once again, lazy and predictable. It turns James into a self-sacrificing love interest cliche and it turns Lena into the fawning damsel love interest – the “My hero!” cliche. It ‘dumbs them down.’

This, on top of the sentiment mentioned in point 3 just turns their whole romance (or at least the beginning of it) into a walking cliche. Because clearly we need more…😴🙄

James, Who?🤔

5) James had very little development last season, despite the Guardian arc. A lot of people became pretty bored with him because of that or just ended up with a sour taste in their mouth because of how things changed from the point of him pressuring Kara to tell Lucy she’s Supergirl to the point of him being jealous because of Supergirl’s hero worship. Everyone has their own reasons for liking, loving, disliking, or just being indifferent to James. Nothing wrong with that. But the fact remains, his character was sadly underutilized in S2. So at this point, they need something (or apparently, someone) to make him more relevant again. The idea of using Lena to do this is kind of gross. Where am I getting that thought?

That first little spoiler kinda points that out. Because let’s face it… there is nothing “amazing” about him doing essentially the same stuff he was doing in S2 (being Guardian and being James at Cat Co). So that line of ‘teasing’ is a bit transparent. In order to develop him further and better, let’s try to make it more interesting than using a romantic subplot, shall we?

Lena Would Never…

6) OOC Lena, much? We already know Lena is feeling guilty for building the device that caused Mon-El to forcibly leave Earth, thus leave Kara. Thanks to Katie, we also know that Lena will be putting forth a strong effort to remedy this and keep their friendship going strong. So in what universe in attempting to do this, would Lena also think it’s a good idea to date Kara’s ex? The Lena we have so far wouldn’t do that at all.

Do It Better! 😡

7) Concurrently, let’s not turn Lena into a plot device to serve a male character’s desperate need for development, yeah? If they can’t find a way to bring Lena into the Super Friends other than her A) Being Kara’s best friend B) Doing everything she has done thus far, that’s a gross injustice to Lena as a character and kind of, for lack of better phrasing, shits on Kara too. Kara fought for Lena all of S2, and yet everyone still doubted her.

So to those saying that this is a good way to introduce Lena to the Super Friends, no. Think of this – the idea essentially being:

“Oh, Lena can’t be that bad. Look James is dating her! Kara must have been right!” Forget about her friendship with Kara, forget about her doing what she can to make National City better simply because she feels it’s her duty to do so, forget about her building rapport with Winn, forget about her saving the lives of thousands of aliens, forget about her taking a role in attempting to take down a terrorist organization (despite the fact that it is run by her mother), forget about her playing an incredibly strong role in pushing back the invasion. Forget all of that. Forget all of the good she did on her own. Let’s give her a chance because James is dating her all of a sudden. Bad. Bad. No. Stop.

In a Nutshell…

It’s wrong. Yet, the writers have not placed themselves above that kind of character injustice and complete lack of sensibility. So I wouldn’t be shocked, just disappointed if they prove me right (and I like being right most of the time!). I think it could be great for them to start off/remain as friends. Lena could definitely use more of those!

And yes, people can have changes of mind and heart, which is great. But there is a need for that before anything romantic happens. It shouldn’t be simultaneous. It’s bad writing. James needs to step off his high horse when it comes to Lena, and Lena needs to personally address her need for validation. But having James do a total 180 and using Lena to further his development while forcing Lena to continue to seek that validation and prove herself to the one person in the show that has shown her the harshest judgment, pushing them together in a short amount of time is something I really do not want to see.

where-is-sif  asked:

What are some good questions to ask yourself in figuring out your own type?

What am I most comfortable doing [in a dominant position]?

a) centering myself and following my ethical beliefs without fear of censorship from or offending others (Fi; IXFP)

b) detached analysis and system building my perception of the outer world (Ti; IXTP)

c) predicting future patterns, inventing personal symbolism, and having faith in my greater over-reaching vision (Ni; INXJ)

d) recalling past events with clarity and trusting that my personal experience will help me succeed through careful exploration of new concepts (Si; ISXJ)

e) getting people to work together for the greater good, sharing my feelings in ways that confront the problem or resolve issues and asserting my opinion (Fe; EXFJ)

f) taking charge in a situation as a leader when required, sharing my facts and organizing the environment to accomplish a swift resolution or goal (Te; EXTJ)

g) trusting my natural ability to innovate without warning, change my mind mid-stream, or come up with creative new interpretations of patterns and data, because I see beyond the object to what it could be (Ne; ENXP)

h) free and easy engagement with the environment, in order to challenge myself and others to better enjoy the moment and take part in affecting immediate change, without needing time to adjust to a new environment (Se; ESXP)

How do I tend to communicate my feelings?

a) as they happen and with confidence because I know both how to express myself and comfort other people (high Fe; FJ)

b) as they happen but I cannot always control it and struggle to know what to say to comfort other people (low Fe; TP)

c) sometimes through bluntness, sarcasm or by telling people off; I often have to go be alone to sort out my true feelings, before I can even start to talk about them with the few people I trust with them (high Fi; FP)

d) almost always after the fact, and I may not be sure how I feel sometimes, so I might push aside my feelings to ‘get the job done’ and have a private breakdown later where no one else can see (low Fi; TJ)

What is my worst weakness?

a) remembering details or having a solid perception of other people, and especially myself (inferior Si; ENXP)

b) interacting with the physical environment in ways that do no harm to myself or others and/or extreme laziness / lack of motivation to act (inferior Se; INXJ)

c) developing a singular worst case scenario vision for the future, and feeling trapped by it so that I cease healthy interaction with the present (inferior Ni; ESXP)

d) being afraid to let go of ‘what I know / was taught’ in favor of new ideas, and/or creating a thousand ways this will go terribly under stress (inferior Ne; ISXJ)

e) not understanding the strength of my own feelings and ethics, and becoming highly emotional and passive-aggressive under stress (inferior Fi; EXTJ)

f) throwing tantrums and losing my temper and/or wanting people to like me, even though I feel totally at a loss as to how to interact with their feelings (inferior Fe; IXTP)

g) complaining that other people are ‘irrational’ while being unable to detach from my strong feelings in order to question my own perceptions and judgments; a tendency to either over-analyze useless things or dismiss the need to understand other people in favor of judging them (inferior Ti; EXFJ)

h) becoming a drill sergeant under stress, with outbursts of bossiness, criticism, and bluntly shared truths directed at other people to shame them (inferior Te; IXFP)

I recommend focusing both on your strengths (dom) and weaknesses, as well as how you communicate with others.

- ENFP Mod

Why I eat a banana everyday!

Bananas are great sources of many nutrients. Bananas:

-Have ~350mg of potassium per serving, which helps to regulate the cardiovascular system
-Contain trace amounts of fat. The fat they do have belongs to the sterol family, which helps to control blood cholesterol
-Packs 3g of fiber. Soluble fiber helps to clean the digestive track, regulate carbohydrate conversion, and may lower the risk of heart disease
-Has the amino acid tryptophan, which the body uses to create serotonin. This chemical promotes a good mood
-Are low in terms of glycemic index
-Gives your body a quick burst of energy without feeling a comedown
-Contains ~43% of your daily needed B6. This water-soluble vitamin must be replenished daily, and is responsible for enabling antibody and red blood cell production, as well as regulating blood sugar levels

My favorite ways to eat a banana are plain, cut up in oatmeal, or frozen as part of a smoothie!

eternalsunshine13  asked:

crackfic prompt: musician yuuri and mafia victor. Victor smuggles a different kind of organ than usual for Yuuri

L;LAL;KJF;SLAD

This is for the yoi mafia zine discord, which has been victim to my presence lately.


Some days, Yuuri’s fingers and lips buzz with a need to set to work on music — piano, flute, cello, violin, harpischord, anything that inhabits the second story of his home. Said second story is full of sheet music, wood, string, and the dust motes that dance in the rays of the sun, thin layers on the covers of instruments that Yuuri will take a year to cycle back to. 

He is not a musician by conventional definition, he thinks. He’s sold himself to music, but does not purely pursue one path to enlightenment, not like the rest. Yuuri is in perpetual motion, waking up with an itch to compose on something different every week or month or day or hour. He spends more time in the second story with his instruments than the first story with his bed. 

Then again, when his husband is home, Yuuri is compelled to play the instrument that is Victor Nikiforov instead — fingers digging into Egyptian cotton sheets, the tattooed curve of his back that makes Victor sigh whenever Yuuri strokes it, his beautiful mouth that produces sound that resonates with Yuuri’s heart more than any creation of wood and string ever will. 

Whether that sound is Victor’s moans in the middle of them having sex or Russian running roughshod from his mouth, ordering someone’s death, Yuuri doesn’t care. He finds comfort in every sound that Victor makes. 

But… some sounds are discordant and alarm him to his core. Sounds like Victor coming home from a long business trip at four in the afternoon, St. Petersburg snow following him in, calling, “Yuuri! I got you an organ!” 


Basic facts about Yuuri Katsuki: 

Age: 28
Height: 173 centimeters
Profession: Self-employed and highly sought-after musician and composer.
Note: Married to Victor Nikiforov. First instrument was the violin. Prefers piano.


Basic facts about Victor Nikiforov: 

Age: 32
Height: 180 centimeters
Profession: Current Pakhan of the [REDACTED], specializes in organ trafficking and murder. 
Note: Married to Yuuri Katsuki. Uses knives as main weapons. Prefers to cut out people’s kidneys when they’re alive fresh. 

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

I struggle with knowing what is a "good price" for things. How much should I be paying per pound for chicken breasts? Strawberries? Cucumbers? Like produce and meat is weird and I don't know at what price I should buy and at what point I should pass. Sometimes I'll see bogo sales on chicken breasts and my parents will say "yeah that's an okay price sure not great though" and I just ??? Any good guides on when to buy?

I love this question so much- because finding the items you need for the right prices can be frustrating.

Here are some general tips that I hope will help:

1. Prices fluctuate. There are so many different reasons that product prices can fluctuate- increased demand, shortages, changing seasons, etc. Buy your favorite produce cheap whenever possible, and buy it in bulk.

2. Store brand. You’ll find that most supermarkets have their own brand of many popular items. For example- Stop & Shop brand oats and Quaker Oats. Same product, different branding. I guarantee you that the store brand will be significantly cheaper and will taste much the same! It’s my recommendation that you choose store brands over name brands 100% of the time.

3. Skip organic. Have ya’ll seen that Ali Wong special on Netflix? She talks about striving to live that “Whole Foods, organic, sliced mango” lifestyle. That is ultimately the lifestyle that I think we’d all like to live, being able to afford organic produce whenever we wanted. But the fact is- organic is sometimes as much as three times the price of non organic produce. And unless you’re a real food connoisseur, you won’t be able to taste the difference. So don’t try to.

4. Store cards. After you find your go-to supermarket, sign up for a store card ASAP. This card should be free of charge, and will save you a significant amount of money on random produce. Some cards even offer reward programs, like money off of gas or whatever. Worth it.

5. Compare prices. If you’re still unsure what classifies as a “good price” for something, compare product brand prices. Look at how much the product is charging per pound (substitute your measuring method) and choose the best deal. Sometimes things advertised as “on sale” are actually more expensive than other items that are not on sale. 

Sorry this took me so long to get through! I’ve been filling in for people at work and haven’t really had time to think.

essay writing strategy

if you’re like me, maybe you have trouble staying focused on your essays or remembering what you’re writing about when you trail off mid paragraph, 

or hate scrolling up and down the page to see things youve written previously/remember what you were talking about! 

ive developed a strategy for countering this sort of thing in my own work, and figured hey maybe i should type it out because it might help some other people who struggle with similar things! so here goes! 

also, uh .. I dunno if anyone cares about this but im using the Great Gatsby as an example, so if you care about being spoiled about stuff that happens in that book.. dont read the examples?

1. Rewrite/copy down your prompt. 

If you have short term memory problems like I do, this can help you actually remember what it is that you’re supposed to be talking about; and if you have issues skimming and skipping words in a sentence, it forces you to read all of it and not miss a key part of your prompt. 

Example prompt: Explore the thematic significance of symbols of wealth in The Great Gatsby, and what the author uses them to say about society in the text. 

2. Make a messy bullet point list of what you know. 

This doesn’t need to be organized. In fact, it shouldn’t be. At this point you’re just throwing your ideas out onto the word processor. Examples you can use, points you want to make, anything else that comes to mind. 

Example: 

  • Gatsby’s car
  • Daisy as a symbol of money & american dream
    • (quote about her voice being full of money)
  • the valley of ashes 
  • capitalism is bad bcuz it favors people with old money etc 
  • the boat guy 

3. Cut down & reorder your bullet points to make yourself a neat little list. 

Your outline is starting to take shape now! If you can, it’s a good idea to try and think of transitions now; how you’re going to move from subject to subject in your essay. Now is a good time to elaborate on your points, too. 

Example: 

  • Daisy as a symbol of money & american dream
    • (quote about her voice being full of money)
  • the valley of ashes 
    • (tie that in with the deaths of gatsby and wilson, all the people who “lost” in the book started poor, transition to:
  • capitalism is bad bcuz it favors people with old money etc, end with fancy ass profound quote if u think of one by then 

4. Gather all your points and squish em into one introductory sentence.

Your thesis statement, if you rather. Your thesis statement is something of a “preview” of what’s to come later in the essay, so it’s better to write this after you’ve got your outline down! Make sure that your thesis statement answers/addresses the question posed in the prompt. 

Example: 

topics covered (daisy, valley of ashes, capitalism, people dead) 

In his novel the Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald seems to be criticizing how the American system is stacked against the poor, making it difficult, if not impossible, for anyone to truly achieve the elusive “American Dream”. 

5. Stick all that together

Now you’ve got the backbone of your essay! - your thesis statement, and the “topic” of each bit of the rest of your essay. Put this all together, and you’re ready to start padding it out. 

Example: 

  • (theeeeesiiiiiiiiiisssss) In his novel the Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald seems to be criticizing how the American system is stacked against the poor, making it difficult, if not impossible, for anyone to truly achieve the elusive “American Dream”. 
  • Daisy as a symbol of money/the american dream (quote about her voice being full of money) 
  • The valley of ashes (poor people in a bad situation in the wasteland of the city) 
  • capitalism sucks bcuz it favors old money, profound quote, bam done we’re gona rock it 

6. Start padding out your essay! 

See, what I like about writing an essay like this is that you don’t have to scroll around your page in order to know what you’re supposed to be writing about in the section you’re working on. Using your bullet points as a guide, write your paragraph under each one. 

Example: 

  • Daisy as a symbol of money/the american dream (quote about her voice being full of money)
    • A powerful symbol Fitzgerald uses to represent the American Dream is the character Daisy Buchanan. She is explicitly said to have a voice “full of money” and is pursued by many. However, when Gatsby finally achieves his dream of having her in his reach, she seems less magical, less perfect than he remembers; much like the American Dream seems from “close up”. Interestingly, the only one in the end who gets to have “the Dream” is Tom, someone born into money. Gatsby’s attempts to keep her are arguably in vain due to the fact that he used to be poor. 
  • The valley of ashes (poor people in a bad situation in the wasteland of the city)
    • Further commentary on wealth is evident in the area aptly named as the “Valley of Ashes”; the shadow of glamorous, frivolous New York, it is where the poor are left fighting for scraps and cleaning up what the rich left behind. (god, im not gonna finish this, im not getting a grade for this, you get the idea right? write the essay inside your outline. use it like a spine. like a tree trunk, and write the leaves around it.)

7. Write out an intro and conclusion to fit your middle paragraphs. 

Your introduction needs to “fade in” and bring the readers to your “point”; your conclusion needs to “fade out” and show the bigger picture and how your essay applies to other areas. (These aren’t rules that are set in stone per se, just good guidelines to follow when you dont have any other ideas.) 

Your thesis statement is ideally the end of your introduction, leading into the rest of your essay. Generally, the thesis is “restated” in different words in the conclusion, as if in summary. 

8. Delete your outline bullet points and clean it up a little. 

This is like erasing your construction lines after you finish a drawing, and then make sure it flows smoothly together. Reading it outloud to yourself is a good idea, it will help you catch any glaring errors. 

9. Congrats you wrote that dam essay!! 

good job dude!!!!! give yourself a pat on the back and maybe a treat bcuz you deserve it! 

#23

Hitchhiker’s songs are often highly criticized and he has the most dislikes on a YouTube video on the SMTOWN page, most likely because people aren’t that accepting of his complex and crazy music organization. The fact that Taeyong decided to become involved in Hitchhiker’s SM Station shows that he is not afraid to try newer concepts as well as concepts that are not conventionally accepted. 

Step Into My Parlor

wienercutter

if reaper is just fudging it and “in on it” with sombra, why does he seem so angry and throw his guns down in infiltration?

Figured this was worth a little bit of extra analysis!

So something we should probably establish is that the big reason I left Widowmaker out of the essay is because…well - 

She’s probably not “in” on Sombra’s plan.

The argument in the essay was the explore if Reaper was involved or not.  I argued that it’s possible he is, based on what appears to be rather… “sloppy” attemps to complete seemingly straightforward missions.

Widowmaker, on the other hand, still seems to be a diehard Talon agent (we’ll get to Reflections in a second, just hang on with me)

The enemies of Talon will be eliminated.

So at the end of Infiltration, Sombra “reports” back that “the mission failed - target escaped.”

Reaper, in what seems to be a very dramatic act of frustration, snaps, “Get back to the ship.”

And then he throws his shotguns, seemingly in rage.

What a lot of people miss is that literally the very next shot is this:

Widowmaker has her scope on him the whole time.

And more importantly?

Reaper knows that she does.  He looks directly at her afterwards.

He may be undead.  He may not even be able to die.

But I’m willing to bet a sniper shot to the head still hurts (we know that Winston’s Tesla Cannon is capable of putting him “out of action” for awhile, and we see him take hits in Old Soldiers).

Are you really gonna risk lowering your guard/persona/front around the brainwashed agent who killed her own husband and trickshotted her last assassination target?

And more than that, if he is in on the plan, then “dropping the charade” blows his chances.

There’s a lot of guesswork and hypothesis-making involved here, but it’s very heavily implied that Widowmaker is suspicious of their actions - not just in Infiltration, where she makes this face, but also just in general.

Widowmaker has two main interactions with Sombra and Reaper, both of which indicate she’s: 1) suspicious of them and 2) keeping track of their failures:

Sombra: Ah, my favorite spider. I wonder what sort of web you’re spinning now.
Widowmaker: It would be a shame if something happened to you on our next mission. A real pity.

Reaper: Looks like we’re working together again.
Widowmaker: Let’s hope it goes better than the time at the museum.

Returning to the formatting I used on the last essay:

[Factual Lore]: Widowmaker is a brainwashed Talon agent who is “loyal” to the organization.  

[Implications]: Most people seem to think that Reaper is “the one in charge” of the Talon trio of himself, Sombra, and Widowmaker, but given that Widowmaker is the “most successful member” (e.g. killed Mondatta, “killed” Ana Amari, killed Gerárd Lacroix) of the three of them, she may actually be the one in charge.

[Implications]: Regardless of who is “the actual leader” of this particular trio, there’s a very heavy implication that Widowmaker is keeping tabs on Sombra and Reaper.  While Sombra and Reaper have at least two interactions that imply they are “cooperating” with each other, Widowmaker’s main interactions with them show that she’s suspicious of them.  

[Hypothesis]: Widowmaker isn’t in on Sombra’s plan, and neither Sombra nor Reaper know if they can trust her.  They continue to act like they are “dedicated” to performing their missions for Talon, especially when she is around.  We don’t know who Widowmaker reports to within Talon, but considering her “renowned” status (again, see her list of “kills”), the fact that she has enough “weight” to invite Hanzo to join the organization, the fact one of her generic “vs Overwatch” kill lines is “The enemies of Talon will be eliminated,” and the fact that she takes great pride in her skills and her organization it appears that she is fairly well-regarded and/or highly-ranked within the group.  She may report directly to the Talon Council or someone in it.

Rendez-vous avec la mort.

But what about Reflections?

In Reflections, we see Widowmaker return to Gerárd’s grave, and Michael Chu has stated on twitter that there seems to be more going on with her than people thought.

It’s important to realize that in Reflections, neither Sombra nor Reaper are with Widowmaker - they’re both off doing their own things.

They may have no idea that her brainwashing is “wearing off” or that she is capable of thinking critically for herself.

All they know is that Talon’s “spider” was put into their group, possibly to try and catch them in her “web.”  They may not realize that they could potentially have a possible ally in her if they play their cards right.

But again, like I said last time - 

It’s going to be very interesting to see where this Talon story goes.